Czechoslovakia

What is Czechoslovakia known for?


major character

-third reduction in strategic (Strategic bombing) ballistic missile warheads."


special working

The report alleged that the campaign was a carefully planned anti-Soviet action in which a noticeable part was played by the British Royal College of Psychiatrists under the influence of pro-Zionist elements and that the KGB was undertaking measures through operational channels to counter hostile attacks.


green cover

and United States, was banned in the GDR; legend has it this was due to the presence of the American flag, not to the context. The cover was replaced for the domestic release with a simple green cover (the international release on Koch Records was unaltered). The band went on a 20th-anniversary "Farewell Tour," accompanied by Czechoslovak (Czechoslovakia) band Turbo (Turbo (Czech band)) and West German veterans The Lords (The Lords (German band)). http


strict quality


shooting photographs

, photojournalist and cameraman from Czechoslovakia. He earned international acclaim in the 1960s, shooting photographs of well known pop and showbiz personalities, such as The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Dusty Springfield, Charlie Chaplin, Sophia Loren, Marlon Brando, Marilyn Monroe, Laurence Olivier, The Kinks, The Shadows, Tom Jones (Tom Jones (singer)), Jimi Hendrix, Frank Sinatra, Bob Marley, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong


history development

. 24 and vz. 26 (Sa vz. 23) submachine guns. The vz. 58 externally resembles the Soviet (Soviet Union) AK-47 but is internally a substantially different design based on a short-stroke gas piston (Gas-operated reloading), which shares no parts with the Kalashnikov design. http: findarticles.com p articles mi_m0BQY is_3_55 ai_n31326578 History Development of the weapon began in 1956; leading the project was chief engineer Jiří Čermák assigned to the Konstrukta Brno facility in the city of Brno. The Soviet Union had begun insisting that the Warsaw Pact forces standardization on a common ammunition. As a result, the prototype, known as the '''"Koště"''' ("broom"), was designed to chamber the intermediate Soviet 7.62×39mm M43 (7.62×39mm) cartridge, rather than the Czech 7.62×45mm vz. 52 round, used in both the earlier vz. 52 rifle and the vz. 52 (vz. 52 (machine gun)) light machine gun.


producing quot

13, 2011 ), he travelled across the developing world, at first producing "essays in frustration and ignorance" (in the words of Colin Thubron,


summer campaign

the 2nd Baltic Front. During the summer campaign, 2nd Baltic was very successful in crushing German opposition, and was able to capture Riga, helping to bottle up some 30 German divisions in Latvia. On March 26, 1945, Yeryomenko was transferred to the command of the 4th Ukrainian Front, the unit he controlled until the end of the war. Fourth Ukrainian was positioned in Eastern Hungary. Yeryomenko's subsequent offensive helped capture the rest of Hungary, and paved the way


part based

banks of the Danube. Following World War I, the border of the newly created Czechoslovakia cut the historical, unified town in half, creating two new towns. The smaller part, based on the former suburb of Újszőny, is in present-day Hungary as Komárom (the historical Hungarian town had the same name). Komárno and Komárom are connected by the Elizabeth bridge, which used to be a border crossing between Slovakia and Hungary until border checks were lifted due to the Schengen Area rules. With the disintegration of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy after World War I, Komárom found itself under new rule. The forming of Czechoslovakia, whose natural border in the south became the Danube River, separated Komárom from its southern half. In 1919 (confirmed by the Treaty of Trianon in 1920), the territory to the north of the Danube was ceded to Czechoslovakia with the territory to the south of the Danube remaining in Hungary. The town on the northern shore was renamed to Komárno (today the Slovak name of the town), and in 1923 it was reduced from a county seat to a district seat. Although this resulted in a dramatic change in the national composition of Komárno, the majority remained Hungarian. The town was also a foremost center of innovation in mining industry. In 1627, gun powder was used here for the first time in the world in a mine. To drain water from the flooded mines, a sophisticated system of water reservoirs and channels, known as tajchy, was designed and built by the local scientists Jozef Karol Hell, Maximilian Hell, and Samuel Mikovíny in the 18th century. Tajchy not only saved the mines from being closed, but also provided energy for the early industrialization. In 1735, the '''first mining school in the Kingdom of Hungary''' was founded there by Samuel Mikovíny. In the years 1762-1770, the Hofkammer in Vienna, with support from Queen Maria Theresa (Maria Theresa of Austria), transformed the school into the famous '''Mining Academy''', creating the '''first technical university in the world'''. Slovakia in the UNESCO Treasury - Banská Štiavnica In 1919, after the creation of Czechoslovakia, the Academy was moved to Sopron in Hungary. The student traditions of the Academy are still living in the "successors": University of Miskolc, and colleges in Sopron, Székesfehérvár, and Dunaújváros. In 1918 (confirmed by the Treaty of Trianon 1920), most of the county became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, except 7,5% of its area (around Putnok), which became temporarily part of the Hungarian county Borsod-Gömör-Kishont (presently part of Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén). The Czechoslovakian part of the county was part of the Slovak Land (''Slovenská krajina zem''). During World War II, when Czechoslovakia was split temporarily, most of the county became part of Hungary under the First Vienna Award, and the Gömör-Kishont County was recreated. This situation lasted until the end of the war, when 92.5% of the area became part of Czechoslovakia again. Today in Hungary the name of Gömör Gemer preserved only in the name of a small village, Gömörszőlős and in that of Gömöri station (Gömöri Railway Station), the smaller railway station of Miskolc. Since 1993, when Czechoslovakia was split, Gemer and Malohont are part of Slovakia, Banská Bystrica Region. Spiš after the creation of Czechoslovakia In 1918 (and confirmed by the Treaty of Trianon in 1920), the county became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia. A tiny part of the territory (situated in today's Poland below the Rysy), amounting to 195 km² after an internal border dispute had been confirmed to be part of Galicia (Central Europe) (at that time the western part of Austria-Hungary) as early as 1902. After World War I northern Spiš was united with Poland and became the subject of a long-running border dispute between Poland and Czechoslovakia. (See separate article, Czechoslovak-Polish border dispute (1918-1947)). In 1923 Slovak Spiš was divided between the newly formed Sub-Tatra county (''Podtatranská župa'') and Košice county (''Коšická župa''). In 1928-1939 and 1945-1948 it was part of the newly created Slovak Land (''Slovenská krajina''). History Liptó county as a Hungarian comitatus (Comitatus (Kingdom of Hungary)) arose before the 15th century. In the aftermath of World War I, the area became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, as recognized by the concerned states in the 1920 Treaty of Trianon. History Zemplén was one of the oldest counties of the Kingdom of Hungary. In the aftermath of World War I, the northern part of Zemplén county became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, as recognized by the concerned states in the 1920 Treaty of Trianon. The southern half (including the bigger part of the divided Sátoraljaújhely) stayed in Hungary as the county Zemplén. Following the provisions of the controversial First Vienna Award, an additional part came under Hungarian control in November 1938. The Trianon borders were restored after World War II. '''Hont''' (-Hungarian (Hungarian language) and Slovak (Slovak language) and German (German language), in Latin: ''Honthum'', in Hungarian also: ''Honth'') is the name of a historic administrative county (comitatus (Comitatus (Kingdom of Hungary))) of the Kingdom of Hungary and then shortly of Czechoslovakia. Its territory is presently in southern Slovakia (3 4) and northern Hungary (1 4). In Czechoslovakia, the county continued to exist as the Hont county (''Hontianska župa''). In 1923, it became part of the Zvolen county. In 1928, it became part of the newly created Slovak Land (''Slovenská krajina zem''). Following the provisions of the controversial First Vienna Award, the southern part of Czechoslovak Hont came under Hungarian control in November 1938. The remaining northern part became part of the newly created Hron county (1940–1945) of Slovakia. After World War II, the Trianon borders were restored. In 1949, it became part of the newly created Nitra region and Banská Bystrica region of Czechoslovakia. In 1960, it became part of the newly created Western Slovak region and Central Slovak region. In 1993, Czechoslovakia was split and in 1996 Hont became part of the newly created Nitra region and Banská Bystrica region of Slovakia. During World War II, when Czechoslovakia was temporarily split, most of the Czechoslovak part of the county was returned to Hungary under the First Vienna Award, and added to the county Abaúj-Torna, with capital Košice. After World War II, the pre-war border was restored. Fastest_lap 1:49.770 The '''Czechoslovakian Grand Prix''' (Czech: Velká cena Československa) was a Grand Prix motor racing event first held on September 28, 1930 at the Masaryk Circuit now referred to as the Brno Circuit. It was held in the town of Brno in Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic). History The county arose in the 11th century. The southern part of this county was occupied by Ottoman Empire between 1663 and 1685 and managed as Uyvar (Nové Zámky) eyalet (Subdivisions_of_the_Ottoman_Empire#Eyalets_established_1609–1683) by her. In the aftermath of World War I, the area became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, as recognized by the concerned states in the 1920 Treaty of Trianon. After World War II, the Trianon borders were restored and the area was completely in Czechoslovakia again. In 1993, Czechoslovakia was split and Tekov became part of Slovakia. After World War II, the Trianon borders were restored and the area was completely in Czechoslovakia again. In 1993, Czechoslovakia was split and Tekov became part of Slovakia. right 200px thumb Coat of Arms of Turóc (File:Turiec.jpg) Turóc county as a Hungarian comitatus (Comitatus (Kingdom of Hungary)) arose before the 15th century. In the aftermath of World War I, the area of the now defunct Turóc county became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, as recognized by the concerned states in the 1920 Treaty of Trianon. The territory of the county is now part of Slovakia.


major films

been the leading animation director for the Connecticut organization Weston Woods Scholastic, adapting children's picture books. His studio is located in Prague near the Barrandov studios where many major films were recorded. In 2003, he was awarded the "Annie" by ASIFA Hollywood for a lifetime contribution to the art of animation. Annie Awards Winsor McCay Award Winsor McCay recipient

Czechoslovakia

'''Czechoslovakia''' (or '''Czecho-Slovakia'''; ) was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire (Austria-Hungary), until its peaceful dissolution (Dissolution of Czechoslovakia) into the Czech Republic and Slovakia on 1 January 1993.

From 1939 to 1945, following its forced division and partial incorporation into Nazi Germany, the state did not ''de facto'' exist but its government-in-exile (Czechoslovak government-in-exile) continued to operate. On 29 June 1945, a treaty was signed between Czechoslovakia and the Soviet Union, ceding Carpatho-Ukraine to the USSR (Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic).

From 1948 to 1990 Czechoslovakia was part of the communist Warsaw Pact and had a command or planned economy (command economy). A period of political liberalization in 1968, known as the Prague Spring, was forcibly ended when several other Warsaw Pact countries invaded (Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia). In 1989, as communism was ending all over Europe, Czechoslovakians peacefully deposed their government in the Velvet Revolution; socialist price controls were removed after a period of preparation. A few years afterwards, in 1993 the country was separated into two sovereign states, again peacefully.

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