Cuenca, Spain

What is Cuenca, Spain known for?


largest scale

. *Coquitlam, Canada *Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), Spain *Hadano (Hadano, Kanagawa), Japan thumb 250px Cañada Real Leonesa Occidental in Province of Ávila (File:El Cordel.JPG), Spain In medieval Spain the existence of migratory flocks on the largest scale, which were carefully organized through the system of the ''Mesta'' gave rise to orderly drovers' roads, called ''cabañeras'' in Aragon, ''carreradas'' in Catalonia, ''azadores reales'', emphasizing royal patronage


service buildings

Júcar flows first southward and then eastward through the towns of Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), Alcalá del Júcar, Cofrentes, Alzira, Sueca and Cullera, a town located near its mouth into the Gulf of Valencia, Mediterranean Sea. Initially, the campus held the faculties of Philosophy and Liberal Arts, law (legal education), economics, business management, and science, as well as the rectorate, several other service buildings and sports facilities


century+producing

was closed down by royal degree of Carlos IV in the late 18th century to stop it competing with the new workshop. Madrid continued as a weaving centre through to the 20th century, producing brightly coloured carpets most of whose designs are strongly influenced by French carpet design, and which are frequently signed (on occasions with the monogram MD; also sometimes with the name Stuyck) and dated in the outer stripe. After the Spanish civil war General Franco revived the carpet weaving industry


abstract

the Huecar River gorge in the 15th century, ''Las Casas Colgadas'' are the only remaining samples of this type of building which was common in this city a long time ago. Hanging Houses can be considered the most famous civil buildings in Cuenca. They house a restaurant and the Museum of Abstract Arts (Museo de Arte Abstracto Español) and they serve as the background of millions of photos made from the bridge of San Pablo. Monument devoted to the Sacred Heart of Jesus On top of the Cerro del

items from the Archaeological Park of Segóbriga *Diocese's Museum *Museum of Spanish Abstract Art (Museo de Arte Abstracto Español) *Museum of Science (Science museum) of Castile-La Mancha thumb Spanish Abstract Art (File:Museo de Arte Abstracto Español en Cuenca.jpg) Museum, in Cuenca. Parks *''El Escardillo'', with a few trees and a fountain over a small patch of ground. It is one of the few green areas in the old town. *''Los Moralejos'': located near the entry


legal education

Júcar flows first southward and then eastward through the towns of Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), Alcalá del Júcar, Cofrentes, Alzira, Sueca and Cullera, a town located near its mouth into the Gulf of Valencia, Mediterranean Sea. Initially, the campus held the faculties of Philosophy and Liberal Arts, law (legal education), economics, business management, and science, as well as the rectorate, several other service buildings and sports facilities


art religious

of religious art (Sacred art). It can be easily accessed from the Cathedral. The rooms where the collection is shown were remodeled by architect Fernando Barja Noguerol, and Gustavo Torner selected the art pieces from an inventory made by some priests of the Diocese in 1977. Some of the diocese's artistic patrimony was lost during the Peninsular War, the confiscation of ecclesiastical property by Juan Álvarez Mendizábal, and the Spanish Civil War. Masterpieces like The Byzantine Diptych (book-like silver work whose origin is dated around 1370, containing saints' relics), paintings by El Greco, and handcrafted carpets from Cuenca's school, can be seen at the museum. thumb Outside view of El Castillo (The Castle) and the City Walls. (File:Cuenca castillo 1.JPG) The Castle ''El Castillo'' is the name for the remains of an ancient Arab fortress, representing the older structures of Cuenca. Only a tower, two stone blocks, the arch which allows to enter leave the old town from the Barrio del Castillo and a fragment of the walls have been left. The arch (''arco de Bezudo'') is named after Gutierre Rodriguez Bezudo, from Segovia, who fought the Arabs with King Alfonso VIII (Alfonso VIII of Castile) to conquer Cuenca. The castle was home of the Holy Inquisition (Inquisition) after 1583, and it was finally destroyed during the 19th century by French soldiers during the Spanish War of Independence. Nearby are the small chapel and cemetery of San Isidro (Isidore the Laborer). thumb Mangana Tower (File:Torre Mangana.jpg) Mangana Tower Origins of the Mangana Tower remain unclear. In 1565 it was painted by Antoon van den Wijngaerde, which indicates that at that time Mangana had already been built up, and after the attacks by French soldiers during the Spanish War of Independence war – at the beginning of the 19th century – and having been hit previously by a thunderbolt in the 18th century, it became badly destroyed. Mangana Tower was rebuilt by Fernando Alcántara in Neomudejar style – inspired on Arab decorative motifs – in 1926. Finally Victor Caballero gave Mangana its current look in a fortress-like style in 1968. It has a clock on one of its walls and a recording of bell chimes can be heard in the old town at certain times (every quarter of an hour). There are views from the near viewpoints over the river Jucar's gorge and the modern neighborhoods. Mangana can be reached on foot from Plaza Mayor. Town Hall The Town Hall is a building in baroque style (Baroque) built up during the ruling period of king Charles III (Charles III of Spain) and supported over three Roman arches. It was finished in 1762, as it can be read on the façade. The central arch is the only one giving access to vehicles to Plaza Mayor. thumb Hanging houses (File:Casacolgantecuenca.jpg) Hanging Houses '''Unión Balompédica Conquense''' is a Spanish football team (List of football clubs in Spain) based in Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), in the autonomous community of Castile-La Mancha. Founded in 1946, it currently plays in 2ªB - Group 1 (Segunda División B Groups 1-4), holding home games at ''Estadio La Fuensanta'', with a 3,500 total capacity.


site world

; 14 October 1211 Heir of the throne since his birth. On whose behalf Diego of Acebo and the future Saint Dominic travelled to Denmark in 1203 to secure a bride. Vicaire, pp. 89–98. He died soon after returning from campaigning against the Moors. - Thirteen Spanish cities have been declared World Heritage Cities (World Heritage Site) by the UNESCO ref>


previous century

district. Reilly, ''Alfonso VI'', pp. 285, 287 Two years later, he appears as Alcalde of Toledo. Reilly, ''Alfonso VI'', p. 293 Veneration Constantine the Great built a church in his honour. His relics were translated ''ca.'' 630 to a spring at Squillace, close by the Vivarium, the monastery founded in the previous century by Cassiodorus in the heel of Italy.


shows+production

of European-made carpets. Documentary evidence shows production beginning in Spain as early as the 10th century AD. The earliest extant Spanish carpet, the so-called Synagogue carpet in the Museum of Islamic Art, Berlin, is a unique survival dated to the 14th century. The earliest group of Hispano-Moresque carpets, Admiral carpets (also known as armorial carpets), has an all-over geometric, repeat pattern punctuated by blazons of noble, Christian Spanish families. The variety of this design was analyzed most thoroughly by May Beattie. Many of the 15th-century, Spanish carpets rely heavily on designs originally developed on the Anatolian Peninsula. Carpet production continued after the Reconquest of Spain and eventual expulsion of the Muslim population in the 15th century. 16th-century Renaissance Spanish carpet design is a derivative of silk textile design. Two of the most popular motifs are wreaths and pomegranates. During the Moorish (Muslim) period production took place in Alcaraz in the province of Murcia, as well as being recorded in other towns. Carpet production after the Christian reconquest continued in Alcaraz while Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), first recorded as a weaving centre in the 12th century, became increasingly important, and was dominant in the 17th and early 18th century. Carpets of completely different French based designs began to be woven in a royal workshop, the Real Fabrica de Tapices in Madrid in the 18th century. Cuenca was closed down by royal degree of Carlos IV in the late 18th century to stop it competing with the new workshop. Madrid continued as a weaving centre through to the 20th century, producing brightly coloured carpets most of whose designs are strongly influenced by French carpet design, and which are frequently signed (on occasions with the monogram MD; also sometimes with the name Stuyck) and dated in the outer stripe. After the Spanish civil war General Franco revived the carpet weaving industry in workshops named after him, weaving designs that are influenced by earlier Spanish carpets, usually in a very limited range of colours. Sherrill, Sarah B. Carpets and Rugs of Europe and America. New York: Abbeville Press, 1996. Name The name "La Mancha" is probably derived from the Arab word المنشا ''al-mansha'', meaning "the dry land" or "wilderness". The name of the city of Almansa in Albacete also has the same origin. http: culturitalia.uibk.ac.at hispanoteca Landeskunde-Spanien Autonom%C3%ADas AUTONOM%C3%8DAS CASTILLA-LA%20MANCHA.htm Broadly, it spans the elevated plateau of central Spain, stretching from the mountains of Toledo (Toledo, Spain) to the western spurs of the hills of Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), and borderd to the South by the Sierra Morena and to the North by the Alcarria region. 911 Encyclopædia Britannica Mancha, La. Wikisource, The Free Library. July 24, 2010, 11:53 UTC. Available at: http: en.wikisource.org w index.php?title 1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica Mancha,_La&oldid 1973711. Accessed July 24, 2010. '''Zarajos''': A traditional dish from Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain) is '''zarajos''', which are simply sheep's intestines rolled on a vine branch and usually broiled, but also sometimes fried. They are usually served hot, as an appetizer or tapa (tapas). A similar dish from La Rioja is '''embuchados''', and from the province of Aragon, '''madejas''', all made with sheep's intestines and serves as tapas. * '''Unión Balompédica Conquense''' is a Spanish football team (List of football clubs in Spain) based in Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), in the autonomous community of Castile-La Mancha. Founded in 1946, it currently plays in 2ªB - Group 1 (Segunda División B Groups 1-4), holding home games at ''Estadio La Fuensanta'', with a 3,500 total capacity.


silver work

The Byzantine Diptych (book-like silver work whose origin is dated around 1370, containing saints' relics), paintings by El Greco, and handcrafted carpets from Cuenca's school, can be seen at the museum. thumb Outside view of El Castillo (The Castle) and the City Walls. (File:Cuenca castillo 1.JPG) The Castle ''El Castillo'' is the name for the remains of an ancient Arab fortress, representing the older structures of Cuenca. Only a tower, two stone blocks, the arch which

Cuenca, Spain

'''Cuenca''' ( ) is a city in the autonomous community (Autonomous communities of Spain) of Castile–La Mancha in central Spain. It is the capital of the province of Cuenca (Cuenca Province (Spain)).

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