Cuenca, Spain

What is Cuenca, Spain known for?


service buildings

Júcar flows first southward and then eastward through the towns of Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), Alcalá del Júcar, Cofrentes, Alzira, Sueca and Cullera, a town located near its mouth into the Gulf of Valencia, Mediterranean Sea. Initially, the campus held the faculties of Philosophy and Liberal Arts, law (legal education), economics, business management, and science, as well as the rectorate, several other service buildings and sports facilities


silver work

The Byzantine Diptych (book-like silver work whose origin is dated around 1370, containing saints' relics), paintings by El Greco, and handcrafted carpets from Cuenca's school, can be seen at the museum. thumb Outside view of El Castillo (The Castle) and the City Walls. (File:Cuenca castillo 1.JPG) The Castle ''El Castillo'' is the name for the remains of an ancient Arab fortress, representing the older structures of Cuenca. Only a tower, two stone blocks, the arch which


lively cultural

, Gijón, Bilbao and San Sebastián. All of them with historical landmarks and a lively cultural agenda. Background In 1195, Alfonso VIII of Castile had been defeated by the Almohads in the so-called Disaster of Alarcos (Battle of Alarcos). After this victory the Almohads had taken important cities as Trujillo (Trujillo, Spain), Plasencia, Talavera, Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain) and Uclés. Then, in 1211, Muhammad al-Nasir (Muhammad an-Nasir) had crossed the Strait


junta

; On August 29, the comuneros' army arrived at Tordesillas with the goal of declaring Queen Joanna (Joanna of Castile) the sole sovereign. The Junta moved from Ávila to Tordesillas at the Queen's request and invited cities that had not yet sent representatives to do so. Seaver 1928 (#Sea28), p. 164. A total of thirteen cities were represented in the Junta of Tordesillas: Burgos, Soria, Segovia, Ávila (Ávila, Spain), Valladolid, León, Spain León

, Salamanca, Zamora (Zamora, Spain), Toro (Toro, Zamora), Toledo (Toledo, Spain), Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), Guadalajara (Guadalajara, Spain), and Madrid. Haliczer 1981 (#Hal81), p. 167. The only invited cities that failed to attend were the four Andalusian cities: Seville, Granada, Cordova (Córdoba, Spain), and Jaén (Jaén, Spain). Since most of the kingdom was represented at Tordesillas, the Junta renamed itself the

Cortes y Junta General del Reino '' ("General Assembly of the Kingdom"). Pérez 2001 (#Per01), p. 61. In the spelling of the time, it was rendered ''Cortes e Junta General del Reyno''. On September 24, 1520, the mad Queen, for the first and only time, presided over the Cortes. Seaver 1928 (#Sea28), p. 147. '''Luis de Molina''' (September 1535, Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), Spain – October 12, 1600, Madrid, Spain


site world

; 14 October 1211 Heir of the throne since his birth. On whose behalf Diego of Acebo and the future Saint Dominic travelled to Denmark in 1203 to secure a bride. Vicaire, pp. 89–98. He died soon after returning from campaigning against the Moors. - Thirteen Spanish cities have been declared World Heritage Cities (World Heritage Site) by the UNESCO ref>


good position

in road and train communications. Cuenca has strongly bet on culture and as a result of this it was declared a World Heritage site in 1996. In the recent years, new cultural infraestructures such as the municipal Concert Hall or the Science Museum place Cuenca in a good position to apply for the title of European Capital of Culture in 2016. Main sights File:Catedral cuenca.jpg


shows+production

of European-made carpets. Documentary evidence shows production beginning in Spain as early as the 10th century AD. The earliest extant Spanish carpet, the so-called Synagogue carpet in the Museum of Islamic Art, Berlin, is a unique survival dated to the 14th century. The earliest group of Hispano-Moresque carpets, Admiral carpets (also known as armorial carpets), has an all-over geometric, repeat pattern punctuated by blazons of noble, Christian Spanish families. The variety of this design was analyzed most thoroughly by May Beattie. Many of the 15th-century, Spanish carpets rely heavily on designs originally developed on the Anatolian Peninsula. Carpet production continued after the Reconquest of Spain and eventual expulsion of the Muslim population in the 15th century. 16th-century Renaissance Spanish carpet design is a derivative of silk textile design. Two of the most popular motifs are wreaths and pomegranates. During the Moorish (Muslim) period production took place in Alcaraz in the province of Murcia, as well as being recorded in other towns. Carpet production after the Christian reconquest continued in Alcaraz while Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), first recorded as a weaving centre in the 12th century, became increasingly important, and was dominant in the 17th and early 18th century. Carpets of completely different French based designs began to be woven in a royal workshop, the Real Fabrica de Tapices in Madrid in the 18th century. Cuenca was closed down by royal degree of Carlos IV in the late 18th century to stop it competing with the new workshop. Madrid continued as a weaving centre through to the 20th century, producing brightly coloured carpets most of whose designs are strongly influenced by French carpet design, and which are frequently signed (on occasions with the monogram MD; also sometimes with the name Stuyck) and dated in the outer stripe. After the Spanish civil war General Franco revived the carpet weaving industry in workshops named after him, weaving designs that are influenced by earlier Spanish carpets, usually in a very limited range of colours. Sherrill, Sarah B. Carpets and Rugs of Europe and America. New York: Abbeville Press, 1996. Name The name "La Mancha" is probably derived from the Arab word المنشا ''al-mansha'', meaning "the dry land" or "wilderness". The name of the city of Almansa in Albacete also has the same origin. http: culturitalia.uibk.ac.at hispanoteca Landeskunde-Spanien Autonom%C3%ADas AUTONOM%C3%8DAS CASTILLA-LA%20MANCHA.htm Broadly, it spans the elevated plateau of central Spain, stretching from the mountains of Toledo (Toledo, Spain) to the western spurs of the hills of Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), and borderd to the South by the Sierra Morena and to the North by the Alcarria region. 911 Encyclopædia Britannica Mancha, La. Wikisource, The Free Library. July 24, 2010, 11:53 UTC. Available at: http: en.wikisource.org w index.php?title 1911_Encyclop%C3%A6dia_Britannica Mancha,_La&oldid 1973711. Accessed July 24, 2010. '''Zarajos''': A traditional dish from Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain) is '''zarajos''', which are simply sheep's intestines rolled on a vine branch and usually broiled, but also sometimes fried. They are usually served hot, as an appetizer or tapa (tapas). A similar dish from La Rioja is '''embuchados''', and from the province of Aragon, '''madejas''', all made with sheep's intestines and serves as tapas. * '''Unión Balompédica Conquense''' is a Spanish football team (List of football clubs in Spain) based in Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain), in the autonomous community of Castile-La Mancha. Founded in 1946, it currently plays in 2ªB - Group 1 (Segunda División B Groups 1-4), holding home games at ''Estadio La Fuensanta'', with a 3,500 total capacity.


called battle

, Gijón, Bilbao and San Sebastián. All of them with historical landmarks and a lively cultural agenda. Background In 1195, Alfonso VIII of Castile had been defeated by the Almohads in the so-called Disaster of Alarcos (Battle of Alarcos). After this victory the Almohads had taken important cities as Trujillo (Trujillo, Spain), Plasencia, Talavera, Cuenca (Cuenca, Spain) and Uclés. Then, in 1211, Muhammad al-Nasir (Muhammad an-Nasir) had crossed the Strait


religious music

Cuenca Cathedral was built from 1182 to 1270. The façade was rebuilt after it crumbled down in 1902. It is the first gothic style (Gothic architecture) Cathedral in Spain (together with Avila's one), because of the influence of Alfonso VIII's wife, Eleanor (Eleanor of England, Queen of Castile), daughter of the King of England and his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine, who introduced the Anglo-Norman style. From that date the cathedral has undergone some changes. An apse-aisle (doble girola) was added in the 15th century, while the Renaissance Esteban Jamete's Arch was erected in the 16th century. The main altar was redesigned during the 18th century by famous architect Ventura Rodríguez: it features a precious iron-work gate. The façade was rebuilt in 1902 from ruins due to the collapse of the former bell tower, the Giraldo. In the early 1990s modern coloured windows were installed, and in 2006 one of the two old baroque organs from Julián de la Orden was recovered. The other organ has also been restored, and on 4 April 2009 an inauguration ceremony was held. The naves do not follow exactly a straight line. The ''San Julián'' altar, dedicated to Saint Julian of Cuenca, at the apse-aisle, consists of columns made of green marble. Another curiosity are the "Unum ex septem" signs at some chapels. It is said that if one prays looking at these signs one would obtain a five-year forgiveness for one's sins, and seven years if one prays during the patron saint's day. Church of Saint Peter With Romanesque (Romanesque architecture) origins, the church of St. Peter (''San Pedro'' in Spanish) was rebuilt by Jose Martin de la Aldehuela during the 18th century and displays since that time a Baroque (Baroque architecture) façade. It shows an octagonal shape outdoors but it is circular inside, and it is located at Plaza del Trabuco. This church can be reached by going up along San Pedro Street from Plaza Mayor. Church of Saint Michael The Church of Saint Michael (''Iglesia de San Miguel'' in Spanish) was erected during the 13th Century, with only one nave and an apse. In the 15th Century, a second nave at the north side was added. The dome was built by Esteban Jamete in the 16th Century, and finally the wooden ceiling of the two naves was replaced with stone vaults during the 18th Century. Saint Michael (Michael (archangel)) was restored in the 20th Century, and its management was transferred to Cuenca's municipality from Cuenca's Diocese, so that this church could be used to hold classical music concerts. In fact, Saint Michael is home of the Religious Music Week (''Semana de Musica Religiosa'') together with other places within the city and its province. It is located at San Miguel street, next to Plaza Mayor. Saint Michael is accessed through a descending narrow passage which starts at Plaza Mayor left lateral (looking from the Town Hall). Church of Our Savior (''Iglesia del Salvador'') Built in Neo-Gothic style during the 18th century, with only one nave and a high tower. It shows a modest baroque façade and some remarkable baroque altars indoors. The door is however quiet modern, added in the late 1990s. The famous religious procession "Las Turbas", held on Good Friday morning, starts at this location, since the image of "Jesús el Nazareno", which is at the forefront of the procession, is kept within "El Salvador". thumb St. Paul Bridge viewed looking towards the plain with the Old Convent of St Paul on the left. (File:Hoz del Huecar.jpg) thumb St. Paul Bridge viewed from the Old Convent of St Paul looking towards the Hanging Houses. (File:Cuenca2-1999.jpg) Bridge of Saint Paul The bridge of Saint Paul (''Puente de San Pablo'') was built from 1533 to 1589, a construction driven by the canon Juan del Pozo, over the river Huecar's Gorge, aiming at connecting the old town with St Paul (Saint Paul) convent. The original bridge collapsed, and the current one was built in 1902, made of wood and iron according to the style dominating at the beginning of the 20th century. It is up to 40 metres high, and supported upon the remains of the old bridge. Seminary The Seminary (''Seminario''), a rectangular building stretching from Plaza de la Merced to Mangana Square, was established under the ruling of the bishop José Flores Osorio and built by Vicente Sevilla, around 1745. The magnificent baroque façade at Plaza de la Merced was however set up in 1748. It holds a library with numerous ancient books, some of them “incunables” (previous to 1501). There is also a Rococo meeting room inside and a Gothic (Gothic architecture) altarpiece at the chapel, but visits are not allowed. In 2004 some books from this library were stolen, but the suspect of the robbery was caught and the books recovered before entering on an auction process. Now an average of 10–15 future priests are trained there, according to Spanish Episcopal Conference link statistics. thumb Convento de San Pablo (File:Монастырь Сан-Пабло (Convento de San Pablo).JPG) Old convent of Saint Paul The convent of Saint Paul was built in the 16th century by command of the canon priest Juan del Pozo, a monk belonging to the Dominican Order. Brothers Juan and Pedro de Alviz were in charge of the building project; Pedro worked on the convent and the cloister and Juan on the church. The church was finished in the 18th century, in rococo style (Rococo). The convent was ruled by Dominican monks, but during the 19th century was handed over to the Pauline Fathers, who were based here until 1975, when they left due to the possible collapse of the building. In the 1990s the convent was restored to house the Parador Nacional de Turismo in Cuenca, a hotel. The cloister has an ornamental source of water, and the cafeteria is the old chapel. From the convent the old town can be reached easily by crossing St Paul bridge. Bishop's Palace The bishop's palace features, on three of its museums, the Diocese's Museum, which has a remarkable collection of religious art (Sacred art). It can be easily accessed from the Cathedral. The rooms where the collection is shown were remodeled by architect Fernando Barja Noguerol, and Gustavo Torner selected the art pieces from an inventory made by some priests of the Diocese in 1977. Some of the diocese's artistic patrimony was lost during the Peninsular War, the confiscation of ecclesiastical property by Juan Álvarez Mendizábal, and the Spanish Civil War. Masterpieces like The Byzantine Diptych (book-like silver work whose origin is dated around 1370, containing saints' relics), paintings by El Greco, and handcrafted carpets from Cuenca's school, can be seen at the museum. thumb Outside view of El Castillo (The Castle) and the City Walls. (File:Cuenca castillo 1.JPG) The Castle ''El Castillo'' is the name for the remains of an ancient Arab fortress, representing the older structures of Cuenca. Only a tower, two stone blocks, the arch which allows to enter leave the old town from the Barrio del Castillo and a fragment of the walls have been left. The arch (''arco de Bezudo'') is named after Gutierre Rodriguez Bezudo, from Segovia, who fought the Arabs with King Alfonso VIII (Alfonso VIII of Castile) to conquer Cuenca. The castle was home of the Holy Inquisition (Inquisition) after 1583, and it was finally destroyed during the 19th century by French soldiers during the Spanish War of Independence. Nearby are the small chapel and cemetery of San Isidro (Isidore the Laborer). thumb Mangana Tower (File:Torre Mangana.jpg) Mangana Tower Origins of the Mangana Tower remain unclear. In 1565 it was painted by Antoon van den Wijngaerde, which indicates that at that time Mangana had already been built up, and after the attacks by French soldiers during the Spanish War of Independence war – at the beginning of the 19th century – and having been hit previously by a thunderbolt in the 18th century, it became badly destroyed. Mangana Tower was rebuilt by Fernando Alcántara in Neomudejar style – inspired on Arab decorative motifs – in 1926. Finally Victor Caballero gave Mangana its current look in a fortress-like style in 1968. It has a clock on one of its walls and a recording of bell chimes can be heard in the old town at certain times (every quarter of an hour). There are views from the near viewpoints over the river Jucar's gorge and the modern neighborhoods. Mangana can be reached on foot from Plaza Mayor. Town Hall The Town Hall is a building in baroque style (Baroque) built up during the ruling period of king Charles III (Charles III of Spain) and supported over three Roman arches. It was finished in 1762, as it can be read on the façade. The central arch is the only one giving


century+producing

was closed down by royal degree of Carlos IV in the late 18th century to stop it competing with the new workshop. Madrid continued as a weaving centre through to the 20th century, producing brightly coloured carpets most of whose designs are strongly influenced by French carpet design, and which are frequently signed (on occasions with the monogram MD; also sometimes with the name Stuyck) and dated in the outer stripe. After the Spanish civil war General Franco revived the carpet weaving industry

Cuenca, Spain

'''Cuenca''' ( ) is a city in the autonomous community (Autonomous communities of Spain) of Castile–La Mancha in central Spain. It is the capital of the province of Cuenca (Cuenca Province (Spain)).

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