Craven

What is Craven known for?


school great

, England near the town of Settle. It is the site of Giggleswick School. Great Whernside North Yorkshire (Craven Richmondshire) - It is situated about west of Pateley Bridge on the road heading towards Grassington, and is mainly in the civil parish of Bewerley.


active sports

; Gallery, Craven Museum & Gallery Skipton Skipton, which now hosts a programme of exhibitions each year. Sport Craven Council opened the ''Craven Pool and Fitness Centre'' in 2003 and extended it in 2007. The Centre reached the semi-finals in the Best Semi Best Sports Project category of The National Lottery Awards. The ''Craven Active Sports Network'' develops opportunities for participation in sport and active recreation, sourcing funding


large charitable

;ref '''Embsay''' is a village in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England and is situated about 2 miles north-east of Skipton. The village is grouped with the neighbouring village of Eastby in the civil parish of Embsay with Eastby, which has a population of 1,758. Office for National Statistics : ''Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : Craven'' Retrieved 2009-09-18 thumb The parish church of St Thomas, Sutton-on-Craven, built 1868-69 (File:Church of St Thomas, Sutton in Craven.jpg) '''Sutton-in-Craven''' is a village and civil parish (civil parishes in England) in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England that is situated in the Aire Valley (River Aire) between Skipton and Keighley. In 2001 the population was 3,480. Sutton-in-Craven Parish Council retrieved 2011-06-25 The village is adjacent to Glusburn and Cross Hills, but although these three effectively form a small town, Sutton village maintains its distinct identity. '''Litton''' is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England that lies further up Littondale than Arncliffe (Arncliffe, North Yorkshire). A little further up the dale is the small hamlet of Halton Gill. From Litton there are walks over the fells to the east to Buckden (Buckden, North Yorkshire) in Wharfedale and up Pen-y-ghent via Plover Hill to the west. From Halton Gill there is a bridle path over the Horse Head Pass to the east to Yockenthwaite in Langstrothdale. This path was used by the priest from Hubberholme to reach the small chapel in Halton Gill.


success made

landscape '''Embsay''' is a village in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England and is situated about 2 miles north-east of Skipton. The village is grouped with the neighbouring village of Eastby in the civil parish of Embsay with Eastby, which has a population of 1,758. Office for National Statistics : ''Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : Craven'' Retrieved 2009-09-18 thumb The parish church of St Thomas, Sutton-on-Craven, built 1868-69 (File:Church of St Thomas, Sutton in Craven.jpg) '''Sutton-in-Craven''' is a village and civil parish (civil parishes in England) in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England that is situated in the Aire Valley (River Aire) between Skipton and Keighley. In 2001 the population was 3,480. Sutton-in-Craven Parish Council retrieved 2011-06-25 The village is adjacent to Glusburn and Cross Hills, but although these three effectively form a small town, Sutton village maintains its distinct identity. '''Litton''' is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England that lies further up Littondale than Arncliffe (Arncliffe, North Yorkshire). A little further up the dale is the small hamlet of Halton Gill. From Litton there are walks over the fells to the east to Buckden (Buckden, North Yorkshire) in Wharfedale and up Pen-y-ghent via Plover Hill to the west. From Halton Gill there is a bridle path over the Horse Head Pass to the east to Yockenthwaite in Langstrothdale. This path was used by the priest from Hubberholme to reach the small chapel in Halton Gill.


young quot

drained impermeable areas of millstone grit, shale or clays the topsoil gets waterlogged in Winter and Spring. Here tree suppression combined with the heavier rainfall results in blanket bog up to thick. The erosion of peat ca 2010 still exposes stumps of ancient trees.


quot landscape

"landscape" Neolithic farmers permanently settled in Craven, bringing domesticated (Domestication) livestock and used those stone axes to clear woodlands, probably by slash-and-burn, to increase areas for grazing and crops. Roman occupation In the first century the Romans, having trouble controlling the Brigantes in the Yorkshire Dales, built forts at strategic points. In Craven one fort, possibly named Olenacum, http


book online

the name Craven. The Book included lands further west than any later description: Melling (Melling-with-Wrayton), Wennington (Wennington, Lancashire) and Hornby (Hornby-with-Farleton) The Domesday Book Online, Lancashire Retrieved November 2010 on the River Lune in Lonsdale (Lonsdale (hundred)) and even Holker near Grange over Sands in Cumbria. The historic northwestern boundary


national industry

s and slopes of Craven are greatly involved in the history of sheep particularly in the history of wool (Wool#History). After 5000 BC the Neolothic farming movement introduced domesticated sheep, '''Embsay''' is a village in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England and is situated about 2 miles north-east of Skipton. The village is grouped with the neighbouring village of Eastby in the civil parish of Embsay with Eastby, which has a population of 1,758. Office for National Statistics : ''Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : Craven'' Retrieved 2009-09-18 thumb The parish church of St Thomas, Sutton-on-Craven, built 1868-69 (File:Church of St Thomas, Sutton in Craven.jpg) '''Sutton-in-Craven''' is a village and civil parish (civil parishes in England) in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England that is situated in the Aire Valley (River Aire) between Skipton and Keighley. In 2001 the population was 3,480. Sutton-in-Craven Parish Council retrieved 2011-06-25 The village is adjacent to Glusburn and Cross Hills, but although these three effectively form a small town, Sutton village maintains its distinct identity. '''Litton''' is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England that lies further up Littondale than Arncliffe (Arncliffe, North Yorkshire). A little further up the dale is the small hamlet of Halton Gill. From Litton there are walks over the fells to the east to Buckden (Buckden, North Yorkshire) in Wharfedale and up Pen-y-ghent via Plover Hill to the west. From Halton Gill there is a bridle path over the Horse Head Pass to the east to Yockenthwaite in Langstrothdale. This path was used by the priest from Hubberholme to reach the small chapel in Halton Gill.


national detailed

of 21.9% since 1998; an annual increase of 1.8%. The value of output per capita (estimated to be £19,703) has increased by 32% since 1998. Transport The district is free from motorways. It was shown a national detailed Land Use Survey by the Office for National Statistics in 2005 that Craven has the least proportion of land taken up by roads of any district in England: 0.7%. This compared with a maximum of over 20% in four London boroughs and the City


cultural partnership

Children's Trust * ''York and North Yorkshire Cultural Partnership'' brings together a number of Yorkshire agencies that bring the benefits of culture to quality of life and economic regeneration. This partnership is working together to deliver the York and North Yorkshire Cultural Strategy 2009–2014. York and North Yorkshire Cultural Partnership * ''Welcome to Yorkshire'' works to improves what the region has to offer tourists.<

Craven

website cravendc.gov.uk '''Craven''' is a local government district (Non-metropolitan district) of North Yorkshire, England centred on the market town of Skipton. In 1974 (Local Government Act 1972), Craven district (Districts of England) was formed as the merger of Skipton urban district, Settle Rural District and most of Skipton Rural District, all in the West Riding of Yorkshire. It comprises the upper reaches of Airedale, Wharfedale, Ribblesdale, and includes most of the Aire Gap and Craven Basin (Craven Fault#Craven Basin).

The name Craven is much older than the modern district, and encompassed a larger area (Craven in the Domesday Book). This history is also reflected in the way the term is still commonly used, for example by the Church of England.

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