Chukotsky District

What is Chukotsky District known for?


cultural collaboration

cultural tradition, with Uelen being a notable hub, particularly for whale bone carving. Famous for its walrus ivory carvings, Uelen has long been a major artistic center in the region, with several of the leading exponents of the craft, such as Vukvutagin, Vukvol, Tukkay, and Khukhutan, working out of Uelen. It is also home to an indigenous choir which has a history of cultural collaboration with their Inuit cousins across the Bering Strait in Alaska. The village also serves as the base for archaeological (archaeology) expeditions to the area, which have uncovered a burial ground containing over three hundred burials of early Whale Hunter cultures, covering a time span from 500 BCE to 1000 CE. These excavations have shown that Uelen was a major settlement in the first centuries CE. In addition to revealing the existence of a culture dependent on whale and walrus hunting, archeologists also unearthed early examples of the indigenous peoples ivory carvings, a number of which are now held at the Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (Kunstkamera) in St. Petersburg (Saint Petersburg). The writer Yuri Rytkheu was born in Uelen in 1930 to a family of trappers and hunters and was the first Chukchi author to achieve national prominence. His book ''A Dream in Polar Fog'' deals with the Chukchi people's efforts to adapt when a foreigner is shipwrecked on their shores. Yury Rytkheu. ''A Dream in Polar Fog'', trans. by Ilona Yazhbin Chavasse. Archipelago Books, 2006. ISBN 978-0-9778576-1-6 The district hosts the dog sled race "Hope" and the sea hunters' "Beringiya" festival. Administrative and municipal status Within the framework of administrative divisions (subdivisions of Russia#Administrative divisions), Chukotsky District is one of the six (administrative divisions of Chukotka Autonomous Okrug) in the autonomous okrug. The ''selo (village#Russia)'' of Lavrentiya serves as its administrative center. The district does not have any lower-level administrative divisions and has administrative jurisdiction over six rural localities (types of inhabited localities in Russia). As a municipal division (subdivisions of Russia#Municipal divisions), the district is incorporated as '''Chukotsky Municipal District''' and is divided into six rural settlements. ; Whalen in older English-language sources; Ugelen on USCGS charts) is a rural locality (types of inhabited localities in Russia) (a ''selo (village#Russia)'') in the Chukotsky District, just south of the Arctic Circle in Chukotka Autonomous Okrug in the Russian Far East. Population: 776 in 2003, with 595 Chukchi (Chukchi people) and 72 Yupik (Yupik peoples). Located near Cape Dezhnev where the Bering Sea meets the Chukchi Sea, it is the easternmost settlement in Russia (Extreme points of Russia) and the whole of Eurasia. Uelen is also the closest Russian settlement to the United States. It is on the northeast corner of the Uelen Lagoon, a roughly 15 by 3 km east-west lagoon separated from the ocean by a sandspit. Municipally, Uelen is subordinated to Chukotsky Municipal District and is incorporated as '''Uelen Rural Settlement'''.


important historical

; The diagram is not exhaustive, it merely outlines those moves noted by the sources. The table below outlines some of the more important historical localities within the district. class "wikitable" style "width:60%" align "center" + List of abolished localities in Chukotsky District - bgcolor "#CCCCFF" align "center" !Locality name !Comments - style "text-align:left;" Akkani Also known as Akani, Y'kynyn, and Yakkani


756

%) *'''''selo (village#Russia)'' of Enurmino''' - valign "top" Inchoun ( ) align "center" 1459 align "center" 703 (48.2%) align "center" 756 (51.8%) *'''''selo'' of Lavrentiya''' (administrative center


studies year

for oil and dog food. - style "text-align:left;" Naukan Also known as Nuuken, this village was a cultural center of the Naukan Yupik and developed its own branch of the language (Naukan Yupik (Naukan Yupik language)).


centuries amp

as the base for archaeological (archaeology) expeditions to the area, which have uncovered a burial ground containing over three hundred burials of early Whale Hunter cultures, covering a time span from 500 BCE to 1000 CE. These excavations have shown that Uelen was a major settlement in the first centuries CE. In addition to revealing the existence of a culture dependent on whale and walrus hunting, archeologists also unearthed early examples of the indigenous peoples


free+early

; the surroundings of the Akkani cape are ice free early and late in the season; close to a preferred walrus watch-out west of Cape Kriguygu; close to berry and plant gathering areas. - style "text-align:left;" Chegitun Also known as Sagtuq. Its population grew from 73 in 1927 to 124 (including four non-native people) in 1943. It was abolished by 1957 at the earliest, when the inhabitants were moved to Inchoun


small number

a substantial program of relocation, closing a large number of indigenous settlements and relocating their inhabitants to a small number of villages. Krupnik and Chlenov, p. 60 These settlements were destined to become local hubs and model Soviet villages Krupnik and Chlenov, p. 62 Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union, local indigenous people rely more heavily


hunting

on their traditional hunting skills and are considering the resettling a number of these villages due to the lack of centralized. ''Beringian Notes 2.2'', Bogoslovskaya L., National Park Service, Alaska Region (1993), pp. 1-12 File:Chukotsky District Relocations.jpg thumb 600px Chukotsky District Relocations. This diagram illustrates localities with indigenous population which were closed in the Soviet era and shows the destinations where

;Jac" ''Naukan Yupik Eskimo Dictionary'', Jacobsen S. A., Krauss M., Dobrieva E. A., Golovko E. A., Alaska Native Language Center, 2004 The hunting camp of Akkani (two houses, 6 cabins) has been temporarily inhabited by hunters and their families from Lorino since the closure of the Akkani settlement in the 1960s; mostly used during the spring and summer hunting season. Sea mammal hunting site: Protected cove for boat landing; bluff at a cape overlooking two bays

. - style "text-align:left;" Dezhnevo Also called Kangisquq, Keniskun, old Chukchi Valkatlian, Enmytagin, and Mikhaylovsky throughout its history. During Soviet times, until its closure in 1951, Dezhnevo was an important outpost of the Uelen state farm (linked by tractor transport). It was used as a border guard station until 1994. Several remaining cabins are occasionally used by hunting parties. The sheltered bay presents an excellent sea mammal


628

of the district) - valign "top" Lorino ( ) align "center" 704 align "center" 352 (50.0%) align "center" 352 (50.0%) *'''''selo'' of Neshkan (Neshkan, Russia)''' - valign "top"


extremely close

hunting location. The village was formed in 1902 around a trading post run by Olaf Svenson (North-East Siberia Co.) and the Karayev Brothers (Churin & Co.) until 1931, renamed 'Red Star' but closed 1951 with the population moved to Uelen. - style "text-align:left;" Kotrytkino Also known as Kytrytkyn and Kytryn. It was extremely close

Chukotsky District

'''Chukotsky District''' ( The population of Lavrentiya accounts for 30.2% of the district's total population.

The district is populated mainly by indigenous peoples, the majority being either Chukchi (Chukchi people) or Yupik (Yupik peoples). The sparse nature of the population means that this is the only district in the autonomous okrug without any urban localities. The ''selo (village#Russia)'' of Uelen is located in the district, which is a focal point for indigenous artwork of the region as a whole and the birthplace of Yuri Rytkheu, the first internationally recognized Chukchi writer.

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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017