Christchurch

What is Christchurch known for?


live acts

;ref producing many quality shows. The Ngaio Marsh Theatre, located at the University of Canterbury, hosts a range of student drama groups, as well as other theatre groups. Music The city is known for its many live acts,


low energy

Commons:Category:Christchurch WikiPedia:Christchurch Dmoz:Regional Oceania New Zealand Canterbury Christchurch


creating world

skiing and snowboarding locations in the world, with workers at these venues creating world class facilities for competitions. Whakapapa and Turoa are the only commercial resorts on the North Island, Queenstown (Queenstown, New Zealand), Wanaka and Christchurch are the top locations in the South Island to access the mountains. In addition to the commercial ski resorts, New Zealand has many non-profit club fields (Club skifield) across both the North and South Islands


musical recordings

to 4.30 pm. Live broadcasts are done by volunteers during daytime and automated music plays at night. The station broadcasts a mix of historical musical recordings from dancebands, stage, screen, radio and television covering music from the 1930s to the 1980s. '''Queen Elizabeth II Park''' was a multi-use stadium in Christchurch, New Zealand. The stadium has a capacity of 25,000 people. It was built in 1973, to host the 1974 British Commonwealth Games in which a temporary 10,000


show featuring

, major changes to Channel Z were made, including the abolishment of local shows in both Wellington and Christchurch and everything being networked from Auckland. This was obviously not a positive move, especially for Wellingtonians (where Channel Z began). Jon & Nathan's breakfast show was also later canned in favour of a new show featuring James Coleman on his own, with Bomber and Clarke Gayford moving from Nights to Drive. Can anyone help with any photos of any railway stations


development location

plentifully in association with pine forests in the southern KwaZulu-Natal Midlands in South Africa for more than 50 years and is believed to have been introduced with the import of pine trees.


local film

in international films and art house productions. The Rialto also hosted the majority of the city's various film festivals and was home to the local film society. The Rialto was closed following the February 2011 earthquake. The Christchurch Arts Centre includes two art house cinemas, Cloisters and The Academy, screening a wide selection of contemporary, classic and foreign language films. The Canterbury Film Society is active in the city. Canterbury Film Society (from the official Canterbury Film Society website) Parks and nature Commons:Category:Christchurch WikiPedia:Christchurch Dmoz:Regional Oceania New Zealand Canterbury Christchurch


works public

position as lead loco. “Josephine” had to be removed from the train at Palmerston, as the driver had forced her to take too much of the load and as a consequence she developed mechanical problems. Upon the general re-numbering of 1888-90 “Josephine” was numbered E 175, and lasted in NZR service until 1900. She was sold to the Public Works Department (New Zealand Ministry of Works), re-numbered PWD 504 and used in the construction of railway lines before they were handed over to the Railways


contribution long

War II . He died of a heart attack in 1967. Key and his two sisters were raised in a state house (state housing) in the Christchurch suburb of Bryndwr


main field

is the main hockey (field hockey) venue in the city. Porritt Park in Avonside was the main venue until the 2010 Canterbury earthquake, when it was damaged by liquefaction. * Horncastle Arena in Addington, Christchurch. Hosted the 1999 Netball World Championships and continues to host international basketball and netball games. * Hagley Oval has been used on-and-off as a venue for local, national and international cricket matches for decades, and in 2013 it was announced

Christchurch

image_flag Chch FLAG.jpg flag_size image_seal seal_size image_shield Chch COA.JPG shield_link Coat of arms of the City of Christchurch image_map mapsize map_caption pushpin_map New Zealand pushpin_label_position right pushpin_map_caption pushpin_mapsize coordinates_region NZ subdivision_type Country subdivision_name subdivision_type1 Island (List of islands of New Zealand) subdivision_name1 South Island subdivision_type2 Region (Regions of New Zealand) subdivision_name2 Canterbury (Canterbury, New Zealand) subdivision_type3 Territorial authority subdivision_name3 Christchurch City Council government_footnotes government_type leader_title Mayor (Mayor of Christchurch) leader_name Lianne Dalziel established_title Settled by the UK established_date 1848 established_title1 established_date1 area_magnitude unit_pref area_footnotes area_total_km2 1426 area_land_km2 area_water_km2 area_water_percent area_urban_km2 607.73 elevation_footnotes tags -- elevation_m elevation_max_m 920 elevation_min_m 0 population_as_of population_footnotes population_note population_total population_density_km2 auto population_urban population_density_urban_km2 auto population_blank1_title Demonym population_blank1 Cantabrian timezone NZST (Time in New Zealand) utc_offset +12 timezone_DST NZDT utc_offset_DST +13 coor_type latd 43 latm 31 lats 48 latNS S longd 172 longm 37 longs 13 longEW E coordinates_display y postal_code_type postal_code area_code 03 website www.ccc.govt.nz www.ecan.govt.nz footnotes blank_name Local iwi blank_info Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Mamoe thumb 400px right High, Manchester and Lichfield Streets in Christchurch, 1923 (File:High, Manchester and Lichfield Streets in Christchurch, 8 May 1923.jpg)

'''Christchurch''' (

The city was named by the Canterbury Association, which settled the surrounding province of Canterbury (Canterbury Province). The name of Christchurch was agreed on at the first meeting of the association on 27 March 1848. It was suggested by John Robert Godley, who had attended Christ Church, Oxford. Some early writers called the town ''Christ Church'', but it was recorded as ''Christchurch'' in the minutes of the management committee of the association. ''A History of Canterbury'', Vol. 1 – Sir James Hight & Straubel, C.R.; Canterbury Centennial Association and Whitcombe and Tombs, Christchurch 1957, Page 121 Christchurch became a city by Royal Charter on 31 July 1856, making it officially the oldest established city in New Zealand.

The river that flows through the centre of the city (its banks now largely forming an urban park) was named Avon (Avon River (Canterbury)) at the request of the pioneering Deans brothers to commemorate the Scottish Avon (River Avon (Falkirk)), which rises in the Ayrshire hills near what was their grandfathers' farm and flows into the Clyde.

The usual Māori (Māori language) name for Christchurch is '''Ōtautahi''' ("the place of Tautahi"). This was originally the name of a specific site by the Avon River near present-day Kilmore Street and the Christchurch Central Fire Station. The site was a seasonal dwelling of Ngāi Tahu chief Te Potiki Tautahi, whose main home was Port Levy on Banks Peninsula. The Ōtautahi name was adopted in the 1930s. Prior to that the Ngāi Tahu generally referred to the Christchurch area as Karaitiana, Ōtautahi (from the Christchurch City Library website) a transliteration of the English word Christian. The city's name is often abbreviated by New Zealanders to '''Chch'''. "Chch ready...", The Southland Times "...injured in Chch bus crash", The Star In New Zealand Sign Language, the city's name is the fingerspelled letter C (made by forming the hand into a C shape) signed twice, with the second to the right of the first, while mouthing "Christchurch".

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