Captaincy General of Cuba

What is Captaincy General of Cuba known for?


natural life" and "x"="y

title_leader King representative1 Count of Ricla representative2 Ramón Blanco y Erenas representative3 representative4 year_representative1 1764–1779 year_representative2 1887–1898 year_representative3 year_representative4 title_representative Captain General deputy1 deputy2 deputy3 deputy4

of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles III (Charles III of Spain) to strengthen the Spanish position vis-a-vis the British in the Caribbean. A new governor-captain general based in Havana oversaw the administration

in Spanish America. The first diocese was established in 1518 in Baracoa (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santiago de Cuba) and was made suffragan to the Diocese of Seville (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Seville). The seat of the Diocese was transferred to Santiago de Cuba in 1522. In 1520 Pope Leo X established the short-lived Diocese of Santiago de la Florida (or "Santiago de la Tierra Florida"). In 1546 the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santo Domingo Diocese of Santo Domingo


treatment history" and "x"="y

title_leader King representative1 Count of Ricla representative2 Ramón Blanco y Erenas representative3 representative4 year_representative1 1764–1779 year_representative2 1887–1898 year_representative3 year_representative4 title_representative Captain General deputy1 deputy2 deputy3 deputy4

of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles III (Charles III of Spain) to strengthen the Spanish position vis-a-vis the British in the Caribbean. A new governor-captain general based in Havana oversaw the administration

in Spanish America. The first diocese was established in 1518 in Baracoa (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santiago de Cuba) and was made suffragan to the Diocese of Seville (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Seville). The seat of the Diocese was transferred to Santiago de Cuba in 1522. In 1520 Pope Leo X established the short-lived Diocese of Santiago de la Florida (or "Santiago de la Tierra Florida"). In 1546 the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santo Domingo Diocese of Santo Domingo


images light" and "x"="y

title_leader King representative1 Count of Ricla representative2 Ramón Blanco y Erenas representative3 representative4 year_representative1 1764–1779 year_representative2 1887–1898 year_representative3 year_representative4 title_representative Captain General deputy1 deputy2 deputy3 deputy4

of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles III (Charles III of Spain) to strengthen the Spanish position vis-a-vis the British in the Caribbean. A new governor-captain general based in Havana oversaw the administration

in Spanish America. The first diocese was established in 1518 in Baracoa (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santiago de Cuba) and was made suffragan to the Diocese of Seville (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Seville). The seat of the Diocese was transferred to Santiago de Cuba in 1522. In 1520 Pope Leo X established the short-lived Diocese of Santiago de la Florida (or "Santiago de la Tierra Florida"). In 1546 the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santo Domingo Diocese of Santo Domingo


years starting

(today, Camagüey) five years later, after temporarily residing in Santiago de Cuba. (It resided in Havana for a few years starting in 1808 before returning to Camagüey.) The Church also experienced growth. In 1787 a Diocese of San Cristóbal de La Habana (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Cristóbal de la Habana) was established, which included Florida and Louisiana in its territory. In 1793 the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans Diocese of Louisiana and the Two Floridas


series home" and "x"="y

title_leader King representative1 Count of Ricla representative2 Ramón Blanco y Erenas representative3 representative4 year_representative1 1764–1779 year_representative2 1887–1898 year_representative3 year_representative4 title_representative Captain General deputy1 deputy2 deputy3 deputy4

of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles III (Charles III of Spain) to strengthen the Spanish position vis-a-vis the British in the Caribbean. A new governor-captain general based in Havana oversaw the administration

in Spanish America. The first diocese was established in 1518 in Baracoa (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santiago de Cuba) and was made suffragan to the Diocese of Seville (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Seville). The seat of the Diocese was transferred to Santiago de Cuba in 1522. In 1520 Pope Leo X established the short-lived Diocese of Santiago de la Florida (or "Santiago de la Tierra Florida"). In 1546 the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santo Domingo Diocese of Santo Domingo


de

General of Cuba''' ( ) was an administrative district of the Spanish Empire created in 1607 as part of Habsburg Spain's attempt to better defend the Caribbean against foreign powers, which also involved creating captaincies general in Puerto Rico (Captaincy General of Puerto Rico), Guatemala (Captaincy General of Guatemala) and Yucatán (Captaincy General of Yucatán). The restructuring of the Captaincy General in 1764 was the first example

of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles III (Charles III of Spain) to strengthen the Spanish position vis-a-vis the British in the Caribbean. A new governor-captain general based in Havana oversaw the administration


Louisiana

of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles III (Charles III of Spain) to strengthen the Spanish position vis-a-vis the British in the Caribbean. A new governor-captain general based in Havana oversaw the administration

of Paris (1763) . The events revealed not only the weaknesses of the region's defenses but also proved just how much the Cuban economy had been neglected by the Spanish. During the year they controlled Cuba, the British conducted an unprecedented amount of trade with the island. Thomas, Hugh. ''Cuba: The Pursuit of Freedom''. 2nd edition. (New York: Da Capo Press, 1998), Chapter 1. ISBN 978-0-306-80827-2 A year earlier France had secretly ceded Louisiana to Spain

, was introduced into Cuba: the intendancy (Intendant). An ''intendencia de hacienda y guerra'' was set up in Havana to oversee government and military expenditures and to promote the local economy. The first Intendant, Miguel de Altarriba arrived on March 8, 1765. Other intendancies soon followed: Louisiana (1766), Puerto Príncipe (1786) and Santiago de Cuba (1786). In 1774 the first census of the island was carried out, revealing 171,670 inhabitants, and other measures were taken to improve


crime ties" and "x"="y

title_leader King representative1 Count of Ricla representative2 Ramón Blanco y Erenas representative3 representative4 year_representative1 1764–1779 year_representative2 1887–1898 year_representative3 year_representative4 title_representative Captain General deputy1 deputy2 deputy3 deputy4

of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles III (Charles III of Spain) to strengthen the Spanish position vis-a-vis the British in the Caribbean. A new governor-captain general based in Havana oversaw the administration

in Spanish America. The first diocese was established in 1518 in Baracoa (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santiago de Cuba) and was made suffragan to the Diocese of Seville (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Seville). The seat of the Diocese was transferred to Santiago de Cuba in 1522. In 1520 Pope Leo X established the short-lived Diocese of Santiago de la Florida (or "Santiago de la Tierra Florida"). In 1546 the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santo Domingo Diocese of Santo Domingo


louisiana

of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles III (Charles III of Spain) to strengthen the Spanish position vis-a-vis the British in the Caribbean. A new governor-captain general based in Havana oversaw the administration

of Paris (1763) . The events revealed not only the weaknesses of the region's defenses but also proved just how much the Cuban economy had been neglected by the Spanish. During the year they controlled Cuba, the British conducted an unprecedented amount of trade with the island. Thomas, Hugh. ''Cuba: The Pursuit of Freedom''. 2nd edition. (New York: Da Capo Press, 1998), Chapter 1. ISBN 978-0-306-80827-2 A year earlier France had secretly ceded Louisiana to Spain

, was introduced into Cuba: the intendancy (Intendant). An ''intendencia de hacienda y guerra'' was set up in Havana to oversee government and military expenditures and to promote the local economy. The first Intendant, Miguel de Altarriba arrived on March 8, 1765. Other intendancies soon followed: Louisiana (1766), Puerto Príncipe (1786) and Santiago de Cuba (1786). In 1774 the first census of the island was carried out, revealing 171,670 inhabitants, and other measures were taken to improve


quot victory" and "x"="y

) was an administrative district of the Spanish Empire created in 1607 as part of Habsburg Spain's attempt to better defend the Caribbean against foreign powers, which also involved creating captaincies general in Puerto Rico (Captaincy General of Puerto Rico), Guatemala (Captaincy General of Guatemala) and Yucatán (Captaincy General of Yucatán). The restructuring of the Captaincy General in 1764 was the first example of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles

in Spanish America. The first diocese was established in 1518 in Baracoa (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santiago de Cuba) and was made suffragan to the Diocese of Seville (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Seville). The seat of the Diocese was transferred to Santiago de Cuba in 1522. In 1520 Pope Leo X established the short-lived Diocese of Santiago de la Florida (or "Santiago de la Tierra Florida"). In 1546 the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Santo Domingo Diocese of Santo Domingo

, was introduced into Cuba: the intendancy (Intendant). An ''intendencia de hacienda y guerra'' was set up in Havana to oversee government and military expenditures and to promote the local economy. The first Intendant, Miguel de Altarriba arrived on March 8, 1765. Other intendancies soon followed: Louisiana (1766), Puerto Príncipe (1786) and Santiago de Cuba (1786). In 1774 the first census of the island was carried out, revealing 171,670 inhabitants, and other measures were taken to improve

Captaincy General of Cuba

The '''Captaincy General of Cuba''' ( ) was an administrative district of the Spanish Empire created in 1607 as part of Habsburg Spain's attempt to better defend the Caribbean against foreign powers, which also involved creating captaincies general in Puerto Rico (Captaincy General of Puerto Rico), Guatemala (Captaincy General of Guatemala) and Yucatán (Captaincy General of Yucatán). The restructuring of the Captaincy General in 1764 was the first example of the Bourbon Reforms in America. The changes included adding the provinces of Florida (Spanish Florida) and Louisiana (Louisiana (New Spain)) and granting more autonomy for these provinces. This later change was carried out by the count of Floridablanca (José Moñino y Redondo, conde de Floridablanca) under Charles III (Charles III of Spain) to strengthen the Spanish position vis-a-vis the British in the Caribbean. A new governor-captain general based in Havana oversaw the administration of the new district. The local governors of the larger Captaincy General had previously been overseen in political and military matters by the president of the Audiencia of Santo Domingo (Real Audiencia of Santo Domingo). This ''audiencia'' retained oversight of judicial affairs until the establishment of new ''audiencias'' in Puerto Príncipe (Camagüey) (1800) and Havana (1838). In 1825, as a result of the loss of the mainland possessions, the Spanish government granted the governors-captain generals of Cuba extraordinary powers in matters of administration, justice and the treasury and in the second half of the 19th century gave them the title of Governor General.

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