Cape Bojador

What is Cape Bojador known for?


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de&dat 32&geo -70&srt npan&col aohdq&men gcis&lng en title Western Sahara - largest cities (per geographical entity) accessdate 2006-08-24 author Stefan Helders year 2006 publisher World Gazetteer It is shown on nautical charts with the original Portuguese name "Cabo Bojador", but is sometimes spelled "Cape Boujdour". It is said that it is also known as the "Bulging Cape"


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and Portuguese (Portuguese language): ''Cabo Bojador'', French (French language): ''Cap Boujdour'') is a headland (Headlands and bays) on the northern coast of Western Sahara, at 26° 07' 37"N, 14° 29' 57"W. (Various sources give various locations: this is from the ''Sailing Directions'' for the region.), as well as the name of a nearby town with a population of 41,178.


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slaves to Lisbon occurred in 1434. The mythic importance of the cape for Portugal was captured in Fernando Pessoa's early 20th century work "Mensagem." In famous stanzas from this longer poem Pessoa wrote of the enormous costs of the Portuguese explorations to the nation. Capturing the symbolic importance to the nation of rounding Cape Bojador, Pessoa wrote: "Who wants to pass beyond Bojador, Must also pass beyond pain." (Quem quer passar além do Bojador, Tem que


century work

slaves to Lisbon occurred in 1434. The mythic importance of the cape for Portugal was captured in Fernando Pessoa's early 20th century work "Mensagem." In famous stanzas from this longer poem Pessoa wrote of the enormous costs of the Portuguese explorations to the nation. Capturing the symbolic importance to the nation of rounding Cape Bojador, Pessoa wrote: "Who wants to pass beyond Bojador, Must also pass beyond pain." (Quem quer passar além do Bojador, Tem que


fishing activities

The Spanish interest in Western Africa in desertic coast of Sahara was the result of fishing activities carried out from the Canary Islands by Spanish fishermen. Spaniard fishers were seal fur traders and hunters, fishers and whalers in Sahara coast with several enclaves in Cabo Bojador, Dakhla (Dakhla, Western Sahara) and Ras Nouadhibou from 1500 to present, extending by West coast of Africa to whaling humpback whales and whale calves, mostly in Cape Verde, and Guinea gulf

in Annobon, São Tomé and Príncipe islands just to 1940. These fishing activities have had a negative impact on wildlife causing the disappearance or endangered of many species, it highlighting marine mammals and birds. http: fis.com fis worldnews search_brief.asp?l s&id 47446&ndb 1&monthyear &day &country 194&df 1 http: sahara-news.webcindario.com actividad_flota_pesquerasahara.pdf The earless seal's


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) and Río de Oro (in the south) to form the province of Spanish Sahara. *Saguia el-Hamra is the northern third with the city El Aaiún. *Río de Oro is the southern two-thirds (south of Cape Bojador), with the city Dakhla (Dakhla, Western Sahara). * Jan van Eyck paints the Arnolfini Portrait. * Explorer Gil Eanes reaches Cape Bojador in Western Sahara, thus destroying the legends of the "Dark Sea". * Portuguese (Portugal) traders deliver

Venetian explorer Alvise Cadamosto in his book "Navigazione". Starting in 1421, exploratory vessels were sent by Prince Henry the Navigator, managing to cross Cape Non and reaching Cape Bojador, then considered the southern limit of the world, stretching into the ''"dark sea"'' William D'Hertburn, ''Progress and Prosperity: The Old World and Its Remaking Into the New'', 1911 (Latin ''Mare Tenebrarum


attempt

had made a previous attempt in 1433 which resulted in failure, but tried again under orders of Prince Henry the Navigator, who first sent him in 1424. He was successful after the second expedition. The disappearance of numerous European vessels that had made prior attempts to round the Cape despite its violent seas, led some to suggest the presence of sea monsters. The region's coastal areas quickly became a very important area for Portuguese traders, whose first delivery of African Slavery

capabilities. Lagos was also the home port for Gil Eanes who was the first to sail beyond Cape Bojador in 1434, after a failed attempt in 1433 that put him out of favour with the, then considered the end of the world. The act of rounding the Cape, much like the later rounding of the Cape of Good Hope, permitted Eanes (and the navigators that followed) to advance into the African subcontinent. When, by 1443, Lançarote (then fiscal officer of the crown) had sailed as far as Arguim

of oceanic monsters or an edge of the world, but Prince Henry's navigation challenged such beliefs: starting in 1421, systematic sailing overcame it, reaching the difficult Cape Bojador that in 1434 one of Prince Henry's captains, Gil Eanes, finally passed. He joined the service of Prince Henry's expeditions in 1433, when the Infante entrusted him with a vessel and crew, in order to to attempt to round Cape Bojador, until then an impassable cape (Cape (geography)), with the level


previous attempt

had made a previous attempt in 1433 which resulted in failure, but tried again under orders of Prince Henry the Navigator, who first sent him in 1424. He was successful after the second expedition. The disappearance of numerous European vessels that had made prior attempts to round the Cape despite its violent seas, led some to suggest the presence of sea monsters. The region's coastal areas quickly became a very important area for Portuguese traders, whose first delivery of African Slavery


largest natural

characterize the entire length of the shoreline. The Ras Nouadhibou (formerly Cap Blanc) peninsula, which forms Dakhlet Nouadhibou (formerly Lévrier Bay) to the east, is fifty kilometers long and up to thirteen kilometers wide. The peninsula is administratively divided between Western Sahara (see Glossary) and Mauritania, with the Mauritanian port and railhead of Nouadhibou located on the eastern shore (see fig. 11). Dakhlet Nouadhibou, one of the largest natural harbors on the west coast of Africa, is fortythree kilometers long and thirty-two kilometers wide at its broadest point. Fifty kilometers southeast of Ras Nouadhibou is Arguin. In 1455 the first Portuguese installation south of Cape Bojador (in the present-day Western Sahara) was established at Arguin. Farther south is the coastline's only significant promontory, seven-meter-high Cape Timiris. From this cape to the marshy area around the mouth of the Senegal River, the coast is regular and marked only by an occasional high dune. There is no other record or information about Diogo de Silves, whom he worked for or what his objective was. It is often assumed (albeit without corroboration) that Diogo de Silves was a captain in the service of the Portuguese prince Henry the Navigator. If so, he may have been sent out in 1427 as just one of Henry's several expeditions in the 1420s down the West African coast in an attempt to double Cape Bojador, or that he may have been going on a routine trip to Madeira, and it has even been speculated he might have been part of a failed Portuguese attack or slave raid on the Canary Islands. How he ended up in the Azores is uncertain - he may have been blown off course, or may have been gathering intelligence about oceanic winds and currents, perhaps experimenting with one of the earliest ''volta do mar'' routes for Henry. Finally, the note that he was the "pilot" retains the possibility that the captain of that expedition was actually someone else (Gonçalo Velho?). The reference to the 'King' and not Henry raises the possibility he may have been in the service of the Admiral of Portugal Pedro de Menezes, 1st Count of Vila Real (then governor of Ceuta) rather than Prince Henry. Along the western and eastern coasts of Africa, progress was also steady; Portuguese sailors reached Cape Bojador in 1434 and Cape Blanco (Ras Nouadhibou) in 1441. In 1433, they built a fortress on the island of Arguin, in modern day Mauritania, trading European wheat and cloth for African gold and slaves. It was the first time that the semi-mythic ''gold of the Sudan'' reached Europe without Muslim mediation. Most of the slaves were sent to Madeira, which became, after thorough deforestation, the first European plantation colony. Between 1444 and 1447, the Portuguese explored the coasts of Senegal, Gambia, and Guinea. In 1456, a Venetian captain under Portuguese command explored the islands of Cape Verde. In 1462, two years after Prince Henry's death, Portuguese sailors explored the Bissau (Guinea-Bissau) islands and named Sierra Leoa (Sierra Leone) (''Lion Range''). *'''Create (Wikipedia:How to write a great article):''' Abd Mohamed Yahia · Ahmed Bensouda · Akbarali Thobhani · Angra de Cintra · Anthony Pazzanita · Archaeology of Western Sahara · Atlantic coastal desert · Bay of the West · Bir Enxaren · Bir Nzaran · Bouchraya Hammoudi Bayoun · Brahim Salem Zarug · COMINOR · Colonial heads of Río de Oro · Colonial heads of Saguia el-Hamra · Colonial heads of Spanish Sahara · Day of National Unity · Day of the Disappeared · Emilio Bonelli · Erik Jensen (Erik Jensen (politician)) · Farcía · Guelb Lahmar · Hagunía · Hawaa · Imilili · Independence Day (Western Sahara) · International Association of Jurists for Western Sahara · José María Pérez de Lema y Tejero · Law of Western Sahara · Legal and political status of Western Sahara · Leyoad · Mariem Hassan · Marrack Goulding · Miyek · Mohamed Habib Mamia · Mohamed Kaid Salem Souelman · Moharizo · Moroccanization · Nayim Alal · North Saharan steppe and woodlands · Ouaddadi Ahmed Heiba · Peter van Walsum · Political divisions of Western Sahara · Punta Dunford · Reguibat al-Sahel · Reguibat al-Sharq · Religion in Western Sahara · Río de Oro dama gazelle · Sáhara, Tierra Mía · Saharan halophytics · Secretary-General of the Polisario Front · Sociedad de Africanistas y Colonistas · Songs of the Saharan Women · Tbal · Tichla · Touizgui · U.S.-Western Sahara Foundation · Umm Delila · United Nations General Assembly Resolution 2229 · United Nations General Assembly Resolution 40 50 · United Nations General Assembly Resolution 41 60 · United Nations Committee on Decolonization · Western Sahara and the United Nations · Wise Men's Committee · Zini Mountains · Zug, Western Sahara *'''Expand (:Category:Western Sahara stubs):''' .eh · Abdelkader Taleb Oumar · Agounit · Ahmed Dlimi · Ain Ben Tili · Allal al-Fassi · Amgala · Auserd · Beni Hassan · Bir Gandus · Bir Lehlou · Bou Craa · Cape Bojador · Coat of Arms of Western Sahara · Communications in Western Sahara · Constitution of the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic · Daira de Bojador · Dakhla, Western Sahara · Demographics of Western Sahara · Economy of Western Sahara · El Aaiún · Framework Agreement · Free Zone (region) · Geography of Western Sahara · Guelta Zemmur · Houston Agreement · Human rights in Western Sahara · Lagouira · Lamtuna · Lemseid · Mahfoud Ali Beiba · Mohamed Elmoutaoikil · Mohamed Lamine Ould Ahmed · Mohammed Daddach · Movement for the Liberation of the Saguia el Hamra and Wadi el Dhahab · Music of Western Sahara · Oulad Bou Sbaa · Oulad Delim · President of Western Sahara · Prime Minister of Western Sahara · Ras Nouadhibou · Reguibat · Río de Oro · Saguia el-Hamra · Scouting in Western Sahara · Sahrauis: The Music of the Western Sahara · Sidi Ahmed al-Rgibi · Smara · Southern Provinces · Spanish Sahara · Starry Nights in Western Sahara · Stephen Zunes · Tajakant · Tekna · Tifariti · Tiris al-Gharbiyya · UGTSARIO · UJSARIO · UN General Assembly Resolution 1514 · UNMS · Zemla Intifada · Zouérat *'''Cleanup (Wikipedia:Cleanup):''' - The Spanish originally claimed the land from 20° 51' N (near Cap Blanc) to 26° 8' N (near Cape Bojador) in 1885. This would be a protectorate governed from the Canary Islands in 1887. France would later claim the Western Sahara. The boundary was settled in a joint French-Spanish convention in 1900 to divide the area between Spanish Sahara and French West Africa. International Boundary Study, Algeria-Western Sahara 1968 However, the western side is currently occupied by Mauritania, as neither Morocco nor the Western Saharan Arab Republic is de-facto in possession. ''"Quem o passa tornará ou não"'' (those who cross it, return or not), wrote Venetian explorer Alvise Cadamosto in his book "Navigazione". In 1884 Spain claimed a protectorate over the coast from Cape Bojador to Cap Blanc (Ras Nouadhibou). Later, the Spanish extended their area of control. In 1958 Spain joined the previously separate districts of Saguia el-Hamra (in the north) and Río de Oro (in the south) to form the province of Spanish Sahara.


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to be a disappointment for the Portuguese, the decision was taken to hold it while exploring along the Atlantic African coast. A key supporter of this policy was Infante Dom (Dom (title)) Henry the Navigator, who had been involved in the capture of Ceuta (Battle of Ceuta), and who took the lead role in promoting and financing Portuguese maritime exploration until his death in 1460. Henry, a product of 15th century Portugal

Cape Bojador

'''Cape Bojador''' (

It is shown on nautical charts with the original Portuguese name "Cabo Bojador", but is sometimes spelled "Cape Boujdour".

The cape is not prominent on maps but may be located by looking 220 km (120 nautical miles) due south of the southwestern point of the hook of Fuerteventura, Canary Islands.

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