Cambridge, Ontario

What is Cambridge, Ontario known for?


Guelph

of southwestern Ontario, with mostly moderate winters but the occasional deep freeze. In summer, the temperatures tend to be in the high twenties on the Celsius scale, and like most of southern Ontario, there can be stretches of high humidity creating some discomfort. On most days, Cambridge tends to be slightly warmer than Kitchener and Guelph, just to the north. The last frost date of the season is around May 11,

) travels through the city as Shantz Hill Road, King Street in Preston, Coronation Boulevard, and Dundas Street, linking Cambridge to Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario) and Waterloo (Waterloo, Ontario) in the west, and Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in the east. Highway 24 (Highway 24 (Ontario)) runs through Cambridge as Hespeler Road, Water Street, and Ainslie Street, connecting to Guelph in the northeast and Brantford (Brantford, Ontario) in the south. Bridges Cambridge has

has been a determined opponent of the plan. Railways Although freight trains serving the Toyota factory are a common sight in Cambridge, the city at present has no passenger rail service. The nearest Via Rail stations in the Quebec City-Windsor Corridor are Kitchener station (Kitchener railway station), Guelph station (Guelph Central Station), and Brantford. The most easily accessible GO Transit


playing game

baseman . Thorman was drafted in the first round, 30th overall in the 2000 Major League Baseball Draft by the Atlanta Braves. Thorman played for Canada (Canada national baseball team) in the inaugural 2006 World Baseball Classic and Thorman also played in the 2009 World Baseball Classic. *White Knight Chronicles, a Japanese RPG (Role-playing game (video games)). *The cities of Waterloo (Waterloo, Ontario), Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario) and Cambridge, Ontario Cambridge


major+large

powers as a regional municipality. Cities such as Hamilton, Oshawa, Oakville, Whitby and Kitchener all contain major large-scale industrial production facilities, Hamilton being steel-dominated and Oshawa being much more car-oriented. Other significant automotive-production facilities also exist in Brampton, St. Catharines, Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario) and Alliston. Hamilton and Toronto also have two of the largest seaports in Lake Ontario. The Welland Canal system


role playing

cities Stratford (Stratford, Ontario), Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) towns Goderich (Goderich, Ontario), Clinton (Clinton, Ontario) History Highway 8 is one of the oldest provincial highways in Ontario, having first been established in 1918. Up until the early 1970s, the highway was much longer than its current length, extending from Goderich (Goderich, Ontario) through Kitchener-Waterloo (Regional Municipality of Waterloo), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), and Hamilton to Niagara Falls. However, in 1970, the Government of Ontario decided that the stretch of Highway 8 between Winona (Winona, Ontario) (just east of Hamilton) and Niagara Falls was no longer of major transportation significance, since by this time most traffic used the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW), just to the north, to go between the two locales. Accordingly, the province downloaded this section of the highway to the newly-formed Regional Municipality of Niagara, which designated the road as Regional Road 81 (Niagara Regional Road 81). In 1998, the provincial government of Mike Harris carried another downloading of the highway to municipal authorities; this time the section between the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario) (near Dundas (Dundas, Ontario)) and Winona was transferred to the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth. Ontario Highway 8 History - The King's Highways of Ontario thumb left Construction is underway to widen the Conestoga River crossing to eight lanes (File:Highway 8 widening.png) Highway 8 then enters Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), following city streets such as Shantz Hill Road, Fountain Street, King Street, Coronation Boulevard, and Dundas Street. It then continues as a normal road out of Cambridge and into Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), meeting with Highway 5 (Highway 5 (Ontario)) in the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario). Route 25 runs between University of Waterloo and Square One. It also stops at Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), the Charles Street Terminal at Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), and Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo (Waterloo, Ontario). The frequency of this route depends on the direction of travel, as well as the day of the week, ranging from hourly to every three hours. Routes 25B, 25C, and 25D provide extra express services between Square One and the two aforementioned Waterloo universities, bypassing Kitchener and Cambridge. Route 25 runs year-round, seven days a week, while the express branches only run during the academic year. Production The film was shot on location in Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), and Toronto.


charitable research

handles tanker ship and recreational traffic through the Great Lakes. Large rail and truck distribution facilities are located in Toronto, Vaughan and Brampton. As of 2008, however, the manufacturing sector of this region has begun to experience a significant decline in as a result of unfavourable currency exchange rates, high energy costs, and reduced demand from the United States. Whelan is currently the Executive Director of rare Charitable Research Reserve in Cambridge, Ontario http: www.raresites.org and maintains a law practice in Windsor, Ontario. Elsewhere in Ontario, plans are underway to widen the remaining four lane sections between Windsor and London (London, Ontario) to six lanes and to widen the route between Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario) and Milton (Milton, Ontario) as well as through Oshawa. The expansive twelve-plus lane collector–express system (local-express lanes) will also be extended west through Mississauga to Milton and east through Ajax (Ajax, Ontario) and Whitby (Whitby, Ontario). cities Stratford (Stratford, Ontario), Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) towns Goderich (Goderich, Ontario), Clinton (Clinton, Ontario) History Highway 8 is one of the oldest provincial highways in Ontario, having first been established in 1918. Up until the early 1970s, the highway was much longer than its current length, extending from Goderich (Goderich, Ontario) through Kitchener-Waterloo (Regional Municipality of Waterloo), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), and Hamilton to Niagara Falls. However, in 1970, the Government of Ontario decided that the stretch of Highway 8 between Winona (Winona, Ontario) (just east of Hamilton) and Niagara Falls was no longer of major transportation significance, since by this time most traffic used the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW), just to the north, to go between the two locales. Accordingly, the province downloaded this section of the highway to the newly-formed Regional Municipality of Niagara, which designated the road as Regional Road 81 (Niagara Regional Road 81). In 1998, the provincial government of Mike Harris carried another downloading of the highway to municipal authorities; this time the section between the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario) (near Dundas (Dundas, Ontario)) and Winona was transferred to the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth. Ontario Highway 8 History - The King's Highways of Ontario thumb left Construction is underway to widen the Conestoga River crossing to eight lanes (File:Highway 8 widening.png) Highway 8 then enters Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), following city streets such as Shantz Hill Road, Fountain Street, King Street, Coronation Boulevard, and Dundas Street. It then continues as a normal road out of Cambridge and into Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), meeting with Highway 5 (Highway 5 (Ontario)) in the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario). Route 25 runs between University of Waterloo and Square One. It also stops at Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), the Charles Street Terminal at Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), and Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo (Waterloo, Ontario). The frequency of this route depends on the direction of travel, as well as the day of the week, ranging from hourly to every three hours. Routes 25B, 25C, and 25D provide extra express services between Square One and the two aforementioned Waterloo universities, bypassing Kitchener and Cambridge. Route 25 runs year-round, seven days a week, while the express branches only run during the academic year. Production The film was shot on location in Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), and Toronto.


community serving

, after Mr. Galt visited Mr. Dickson in the settlement in 1827 the name Galt received more widespread acceptance. In its early days Galt was an agricultural community serving the needs of the farmers in the surrounding countryside. By the late 1830s, however, the settlement began to develop an industrial capacity and reputation for quality products. Galt was the largest town in the area until the beginning of the 20th century when it was overtaken by Kitchener. The town continued its steady


community building

501&Lang E&GV 4&GID 3530010&Prov 35&S 0&O A Cambridge ON ethnicity data from Statistics Canada See also Karen Dearlove, "Diaspora and Community Building: The Portuguese in Cambridge, Ontario," paper presented to the Narrating the Portuguese Diaspora International Conference on Storytelling, Lisbon University, October 2008. Many Newfoundlanders (mostly from the Conception Bay and Bell Island (Bell Island (Newfoundland and Labrador)) area

) have migrated to Cambridge, mostly due to the closure of the iron ore mines on Bell Island. Karen Dearlove, "(Im)migration and Community Building: Newfoundlanders in Cambridge, Ontario," paper presented to the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Historical Association, York University, May 2006. The city is largely Christian at 80.2%, followed by non-religious people who number 15%. Muslims, Hindus and other faiths make a little over 5% of the population. Over the last few years the numbers of Indians (Indian people), Pakistanis and Afghanistanis moving in from other urban areas or immigrating from their respective countries, has doubled and tripled. Cambridge is also much younger than the national average. 21.6% of the population are under 14 years of age. Only 11% of the population is over 65, resulting in an average age of 35.2, slightly lower than the national average. Transport Interurban streetcar system thumb The car barn for the Galt, Preston, Hespeler and Preston, Berlin railway. (File:GPH-PB station and car barn.jpg) The Galt and Preston Street Railway was the first name of an interurban streetcar service, that commenced service in 1890. The service was extended to Hespeler in 1896. Eventually service was extended to Berlin (Berlin, Ontario) (now Kitchener), Brantford (Brantford, Ontario) and Port Dover (Port Dover, Ontario). Roads There are two main arterial roads that form an 'X' through the city. The intersecting point is colloquially referred to as the Delta. The Delta is adjacent to a Canadian Pacific Rail spur and the Babcock & Wilcox plant, and at peak rush hour times traffic will back up for miles radiating outwards from the Delta. A number of strategies were investigated to alleviate delays caused by trains and as of December 2012 construction of a bridge over Hespeler Road commenced, and was completed 18 months later. Highway 8 (Ontario) travels through the city as Shantz Hill Road, King Street in Preston, Coronation Boulevard, and Dundas Street, linking Cambridge to Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario) and Waterloo (Waterloo, Ontario) in the west, and Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in the east. Highway 24 (Highway 24 (Ontario)) runs through Cambridge as Hespeler Road, Water Street, and Ainslie Street, connecting to Guelph in the northeast and Brantford (Brantford, Ontario) in the south. Bridges Cambridge has some of the most historic bridges in Waterloo Region. The Black Bridge Road Bridge (1916) is Cambridge’s only truss bridge and has been designated a heritage site since 1997. It is still driven upon, though it is prone to major flooding and subsequent closure in the spring. The Main Street Bridge (Cambridge Main Street Bridge) (1931) is a bowstring arch bridge (Tied-arch bridge) made of concrete and is set over the Grand River. Also in Cambridge is the Park Hill Road Bridge (2002), formally known as the Queen Street Bridge (1933). This bridge was one of the three bridges credited with contributing to the development of early Galt. The bridge was reconstructed and widened to four lanes in 2002 retaining much of the original appearance. The Mill Creek Bridge (1837) in Cambridge is the oldest remaining bridge structure in Ontario cities Stratford (Stratford, Ontario), Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) towns Goderich (Goderich, Ontario), Clinton (Clinton, Ontario) History Highway 8 is one of the oldest provincial highways in Ontario, having first been established in 1918. Up until the early 1970s, the highway was much longer than its current length, extending from Goderich (Goderich, Ontario) through Kitchener-Waterloo (Regional Municipality of Waterloo), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), and Hamilton to Niagara Falls. However, in 1970, the Government of Ontario decided that the stretch of Highway 8 between Winona (Winona, Ontario) (just east of Hamilton) and Niagara Falls was no longer of major transportation significance, since by this time most traffic used the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW), just to the north, to go between the two locales. Accordingly, the province downloaded this section of the highway to the newly-formed Regional Municipality of Niagara, which designated the road as Regional Road 81 (Niagara Regional Road 81). In 1998, the provincial government of Mike Harris carried another downloading of the highway to municipal authorities; this time the section between the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario) (near Dundas (Dundas, Ontario)) and Winona was transferred to the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth. Ontario Highway 8 History - The King's Highways of Ontario thumb left Construction is underway to widen the Conestoga River crossing to eight lanes (File:Highway 8 widening.png) Highway 8 then enters Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), following city streets such as Shantz Hill Road, Fountain Street, King Street, Coronation Boulevard, and Dundas Street. It then continues as a normal road out of Cambridge and into Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), meeting with Highway 5 (Highway 5 (Ontario)) in the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario). Route 25 runs between University of Waterloo and Square One. It also stops at Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), the Charles Street Terminal at Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), and Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo (Waterloo, Ontario). The frequency of this route depends on the direction of travel, as well as the day of the week, ranging from hourly to every three hours. Routes 25B, 25C, and 25D provide extra express services between Square One and the two aforementioned Waterloo universities, bypassing Kitchener and Cambridge. Route 25 runs year-round, seven days a week, while the express branches only run during the academic year. Production The film was shot on location in Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), and Toronto.


energetic presence

; where very little happened to a much more energetic presence in the region. A steady growth followed and the decades of the 1950s and the 1960s saw the continuing growth of Preston's industrial base and the gradual expansion of the town toward the borders of its nearest neighbours Galt and Hespeler. City Archives Historical Information-Evolution of Preston History of the town of Hespeler The area that eventually came to be occupied by the town of Hespeler was originally part of the land granted to the Six Nations Indians by the British Crown in 1784. The Indians led by Joseph Brant decided to sell a part of their grant and had the land surveyed. In 1798 a block of land, known as Block 2 and measuring over cities Stratford (Stratford, Ontario), Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) towns Goderich (Goderich, Ontario), Clinton (Clinton, Ontario) History Highway 8 is one of the oldest provincial highways in Ontario, having first been established in 1918. Up until the early 1970s, the highway was much longer than its current length, extending from Goderich (Goderich, Ontario) through Kitchener-Waterloo (Regional Municipality of Waterloo), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), and Hamilton to Niagara Falls. However, in 1970, the Government of Ontario decided that the stretch of Highway 8 between Winona (Winona, Ontario) (just east of Hamilton) and Niagara Falls was no longer of major transportation significance, since by this time most traffic used the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW), just to the north, to go between the two locales. Accordingly, the province downloaded this section of the highway to the newly-formed Regional Municipality of Niagara, which designated the road as Regional Road 81 (Niagara Regional Road 81). In 1998, the provincial government of Mike Harris carried another downloading of the highway to municipal authorities; this time the section between the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario) (near Dundas (Dundas, Ontario)) and Winona was transferred to the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth. Ontario Highway 8 History - The King's Highways of Ontario thumb left Construction is underway to widen the Conestoga River crossing to eight lanes (File:Highway 8 widening.png) Highway 8 then enters Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), following city streets such as Shantz Hill Road, Fountain Street, King Street, Coronation Boulevard, and Dundas Street. It then continues as a normal road out of Cambridge and into Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), meeting with Highway 5 (Highway 5 (Ontario)) in the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario). Route 25 runs between University of Waterloo and Square One. It also stops at Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), the Charles Street Terminal at Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), and Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo (Waterloo, Ontario). The frequency of this route depends on the direction of travel, as well as the day of the week, ranging from hourly to every three hours. Routes 25B, 25C, and 25D provide extra express services between Square One and the two aforementioned Waterloo universities, bypassing Kitchener and Cambridge. Route 25 runs year-round, seven days a week, while the express branches only run during the academic year. Production The film was shot on location in Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), and Toronto.


original appearance

cities Stratford (Stratford, Ontario), Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) towns Goderich (Goderich, Ontario), Clinton (Clinton, Ontario) History Highway 8 is one of the oldest provincial highways in Ontario, having first been established in 1918. Up until the early 1970s, the highway was much longer than its current length, extending from Goderich (Goderich, Ontario) through Kitchener-Waterloo (Regional Municipality of Waterloo), Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), and Hamilton to Niagara Falls. However, in 1970, the Government of Ontario decided that the stretch of Highway 8 between Winona (Winona, Ontario) (just east of Hamilton) and Niagara Falls was no longer of major transportation significance, since by this time most traffic used the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW), just to the north, to go between the two locales. Accordingly, the province downloaded this section of the highway to the newly-formed Regional Municipality of Niagara, which designated the road as Regional Road 81 (Niagara Regional Road 81). In 1998, the provincial government of Mike Harris carried another downloading of the highway to municipal authorities; this time the section between the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario) (near Dundas (Dundas, Ontario)) and Winona was transferred to the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth. Ontario Highway 8 History - The King's Highways of Ontario thumb left Construction is underway to widen the Conestoga River crossing to eight lanes (File:Highway 8 widening.png) Highway 8 then enters Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), following city streets such as Shantz Hill Road, Fountain Street, King Street, Coronation Boulevard, and Dundas Street. It then continues as a normal road out of Cambridge and into Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), meeting with Highway 5 (Highway 5 (Ontario)) in the town of Peters Corners (Peters Corners, Ontario). Route 25 runs between University of Waterloo and Square One. It also stops at Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), the Charles Street Terminal at Kitchener (Kitchener, Ontario), and Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo (Waterloo, Ontario). The frequency of this route depends on the direction of travel, as well as the day of the week, ranging from hourly to every three hours. Routes 25B, 25C, and 25D provide extra express services between Square One and the two aforementioned Waterloo universities, bypassing Kitchener and Cambridge. Route 25 runs year-round, seven days a week, while the express branches only run during the academic year. Production The film was shot on location in Cambridge (Cambridge, Ontario), Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), and Toronto.


sports local

the City of Cambridge 1st every boys competitive team (15U team) playing in the Ontario Volleyball Association. The club is a member of the Ontario Volleyball Association, with Learn to Play and House League programs for girls and boys Grades 3–12. They also have one of the largest youth beach volleyball programs in Ontario.

Cambridge, Ontario

'''Cambridge''' (2011 (Canada 2011 Census) population 126,748) is a city located in Southern Ontario at the confluence of the Grand (Grand River (Ontario)) and Speed (Speed River) rivers in the Regional Municipality of Waterloo (Waterloo Regional Municipality, Ontario), Ontario, Canada. It is an amalgamation (amalgamation (politics)) of the '''City of Galt''', the towns of Preston (Preston, Ontario) and Hespeler (Hespeler, Ontario), and the hamlet of '''Blair'''. Galt covers the largest portion of Cambridge, making up the southern half of the city. Preston and Blair are located on the western side of the city, while Hespeler is in the most northeasterly section of Cambridge.

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