Bulawayo

What is Bulawayo known for?


including historic

. Several World Heritage sites, including historic monuments from the precolonial era and national parks, are within an hour's drive from Bulawayo, making it a great tourist destination. Understand Bulawayo was founded by Lobengula, the last Ndebele king, who settled in what is now Zimbabwe around the 1840s along with a large number of fellow Ndebele who had trekked there all the way from Zululand (KwaZulu-Natal). In 1893, the British South Africa Company invaded the area in a conflict known


opening game

Africa 1962 tour of South Africa by the British Lions had Rhodesia as the opening fixture on the tour. The opening game of the Lions tour saw the visitors win in Bulawayo, beating Rhodesia 38 to 9 on 26 May. The next tour, in 1964 (1964 British Lions tour to South Africa), the Lions won in Salisbury, beating the side 32 to 6. In 1973 Rhodesia played a one-off match against Italy (Italy national rugby union team), winning 42 to 4. In 1970 Rhodesia played New Zealand on 27 July, losing 14 to 27. In 1974, the Lions were back at Salisbury (Harare) where they defeated Rhodesia 42 to 6. The coming decades of the 1960s and 1970s saw a number of home-grown players considered good enough to be selected for South Africa (South Africa national rugby union team).Rhodesia’s rugby playing strength reached its peak in the early to mid 1970s seasons when the country possessed 49 clubs, putting together 102 teams. Wikipedia:Bulawayo Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Localities Matabeland North Bulawayo Commons:Category:Bulawayo


opening+pace

display inline,title '''Queens Sports Club''' is a multi-purpose stadium in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. It is used mostly for cricket matches. The stadium holds 13,000. The club is one of two homegrounds for the Matabeleland Cricket Team, which up until recently was captained by the Zimbabwean international opening pace bowler Heath Streak. The other Matabeleland Cricket Team ground in Bulawayo


large manufacturing

shading pop_name percentages footnote source Zimbabwe National Statistics Agency (ZIMSTAT) 1992 620,936 2002 676,650 2012 653,337 Economy Bulawayo has long been known as the industrial hub of Zimbabwe. It has a large manufacturing presence, and large industries such as Merlin Textiles, Zimbabwe Engineering Company (Zeco), Hubert Davies, Radar Metal Industries, National Blankets, G & D Shoes, Merlin, Tregers Group, Stewarts & Lloyds, Hunyani Holdings, Cold Storage Commission. However, some of these companies have either moved operations to Harare or no longer exist altogether which has crippled Bulawayo's economy. The industries are deserted and the infrastructure has since been left to deteriorate, further deterring investors from operating in the city. The reason for the city's de-industrialization has been heralded to be the lack of infrastructure to support the size of the city and its operations and an unreliable source of water and the collapse of the rail infrastructure which was a core reason of placing industry in Bulawayo to begin with. Many locals argue that it is because of marginalisation they experience against the government due to cultural differences between the Shona (Shona people) in Harare and the Ndebele Proper (Northern Ndebele people) in Bulawayo because the National railways of Zimbabwe (Headquarters Bulawayo) is a government parastatal and as such should have been thriving had it not been for embezzlement of allocated funds by company executives who are believed to be Shona (Shona people). The water issue is not new and had brought about the "help a thirsty Matabele" initiative of the 1970s and the Matabeleland Zambezi Water Project which would put an end to the water issue in Matabeleland was drafted, however this project was put on hold soon after independence. these allegations have all been labelled hogwash by the relevant authorities, however they have only fuelled the secessionist (Mthwakazi) initiative into a general opinion. Before the collapse of Zimbabwe's rail infrastructure, Bulawayo was an important transport hub, providing rail links between Botswana, South Africa and Zambia and promoting the city's development as a major industrial centre. The city still contains most of what remains of Zimbabwe's heavy industry and food processing capability including a Thermal Power Station which resumed operations in February 2011 after a capitalisation deal with the Government of Botswana where Bulawayo would supply 45 Megawatts in three years. Like many parts of the country (Zimbabwe), Bulawayo has for the past ten years seen a huge drop in service delivery and an increase in unemployment due to the number of resignations of people seeking better prospects across the border. Many people resorted to farming, mining and the black market for sustenance, while others depended on the little foreign currency that would be sent by family in other countries. However, with the introduction of the multi-currency system in 2009, a new approach is seen by investors in the city who admire the already-available infrastructure and the huge workforce and Bulawayo as great prospects for the future and is set to once again contribute greatly to the economy of Zimbabwe. The city is served by Joshua Mqabuko Nkomo International Airport which has been expanded a number of times to cope with the influx of visitors into the region. The Edgars clothing stores are headquartered in Bulawayo. The Rovos rail run luxury train, Pride of Africa makes a stop in Bulawayo for pick up and dropping off passengers. Bulawayo is situated along the Trans-African Highway network important trade route of Cairo – Cape Town Highway. Most of the city's industries are privately owned, especially in the transport sector. thumb 350px right The Bulawayo Centre (Image:Bulawayo Centre.jpg) Important buildings and infrastructure These include thumb alt The Nesbitt Castle The Nesbitt Castle, Bulawayo (Image:Nesbittcastle2.jpg) *Ascot Centre *NRZ building *Bulawayo Centre *Nesbitt Castle *Fidelity Life Centre *National University of Science and Technology (NUST (Zimbabwe)) *Mhlahlandlela Government Complex Government Mayors since independence class "wikitable" - !Mayor !Party !Time in office - style "background:#ccf;" Martin Moyo '''(Incumbent)''' MDC-T 2013 – Wikipedia:Bulawayo Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Localities Matabeland North Bulawayo Commons:Category:Bulawayo


starting+public

over in Kenya where they played 3 ODI games (West Indian cricket team in Kenya in 2001) and a couple of first-class fixtures. Ganga made a century in the second of the two first-class games. Under the British South Africa Company In 1893 Lobengula was overthrown when Bulawayo and Matabeleland were seized by the British South Africa Company. A number of other Catholic missionaries entered the new territory with the Sisters of St. Dominic starting public hospitals, and later opening schools for the children of the settlers. The first stock exchange in Zimbabwe opened its doors shortly after the arrival of the Pioneer Column in Bulawayo in 1896. However, it only operated for about six years. Other stock exchanges were established in Gwelo (Gweru) and Umtali (Mutare). The Mutare Exchange, also opened in 1896, thrived on the success of local mining, but with the realisation that deposits in the area were not extensive, activity declined and it closed in 1924. After World War II a new exchange was founded in Bulawayo by Alfred Mulock Bentley and dealing started in January 1946. The first stock exchange in Zimbabwe opened its doors shortly after the arrival of the Pioneer Column in Bulawayo in 1896. However, it only operated for about six years. Other stock exchanges were established in Gwelo (Gweru) and Umtali (Mutare). The Mutare Exchange, also opened in 1896, thrived on the success of local mining, but with the realisation that deposits in the area were not extensive, activity declined and it closed in 1924. After World War II a new exchange was founded in Bulawayo by Alfred Mulock Bentley and dealing started in January 1946. Gauge The man who approved the expenditure for the railroad, Lord Cromer, assumed that the railroad would be narrow gauge (presumably something like 2' 0" or 2' 6"), to save money. Kitchener, however, insisted on the Cape gauge of Wikipedia:Bulawayo Dmoz:Regional Africa Zimbabwe Localities Matabeland North Bulawayo Commons:Category:Bulawayo


black+activism

). Dictionary of South African Biography, Vol.4, Durban: Butterworth, pp.730–40. Between completing his carpentry course and furthering his studies, Muzenda became aware of politics during contacts with fellow students, which included several men prominent in black activism South Africa and Rhodesia; after his return to Rhodesia in 1950, he worked in a furniture factory in Bulawayo and became involved with Benjamin Burombo, an activist who was among the earliest to challenge


world number

Price , former world number one golfer, World Golf Hall of Fame member * Ramadu, musician * Surendran Reddy, musician, composer and performer * Rozalla, dance music performer * Ron Sandler, CEO Lloyd's of London; Chairman of Northern Rock bank * Allan Savory, biologist * Shingai Shoniwa, rock musician * Robert Sibson, City Engineer and composer and musician instrumental in founding both the Bulawayo Philharmonic Orchestra and the Zimbabwe Academy of Music


time vocal

in Ireland working as a full time vocal coach, although originally from Bulawayo in Zimbabwe. At the beginning of the 2007 she travelled back to Africa with an RTE crew to Burkina Faso in Africa to make a documentary about children in the developing world. On October 16, 2009, she appeared on The Late Late Show, singing a unique version of Justin Timberlake's "Cry Me A River (Cry Me a River (Justin Timberlake song))", from her new album. '''Mubarike "Mamba"


music productions

' that was released in 1998 under RTP Records. Now based in Johannesburg South Africa. CEO of Sound Force Music Productions. * Raisedon Baya Artist * Nkululeko Nkala Artist * Cont Mhlanga Arts legend * Sabrina (Sabrina (Greek singer)), Greek-Zimbabwean singer Literature The city of Bulawayo serves as the backdrop for French novel "Sale Hiver à Bulawayo", written by Soline de Thoisy (2011). References


black team

in the United States, but a career in football was his main ambition. His footballing career started with a Bulawayo-based team, Highlanders FC, in Rhodesia's second biggest city. In his late teens he was signed up by Durban City Football Club in South Africa, but left claiming to have been sidelined owing to his colour in this predominantly black team — the team had played in an all-White league until the previous year. Immediately after leaving Highlands Park, he signed up for National

Bulawayo

'''Bulawayo''' is the second largest city in Zimbabwe after the capital Harare, with, as of the 2012 census, a population of 653,337. Zimbabwe at GeoHive It is located in Matabeleland, 439 km (273 mi) southwest of Harare, and is now treated as a separate provincial area from Matabeleland. The capital of Matabeleland North is now Lupane (Lupane, Zimbabwe), as Bulawayo is a stand-alone province.

Colloquially Bulawayo is also known by various names, these being the 'City of Kings', 'Skies', 'Bluez', 'Bulliesberg' or 'KoNtuthu ziyathunqa' – a isiNdebele (Northern Ndebele language) phrase for "''a place that continually exudes smoke''". This name arose from the city's historically large industrial base. The majority of the Bulawayo's population belongs to the Ndebele (Ndebele people (Zimbabwe)) ethnic and language group.

For a long time in Zimbabwe's history Bulawayo was regarded as the industrial centre of Zimbabwe and the city served as the hub to the country's rail network with the National Railways of Zimbabwe headquartered there because of its strategic position near Botswana and South Africa. It is the nearest large city to Hwange National Park, Matobo National Park and Victoria Falls.

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