Bridgeport, Connecticut

What is Bridgeport, Connecticut known for?


music singles

. The Chateaus disbanded after several failed recordings. In 1969, DeCarlo recorded several singles at Mercury Records in New York with Paul Leka as producer. The singles impressed the company's executives, who wanted to issue all of them as A-side singles (Single (music)). In need of "inferior" B-side songs, Leka and DeCarlo resurrected an old song from their days as the Chateaus, "Kiss Him Goodbye", with their old bandmate, Dale Frashuer. birth_date


rock+historic

Synagogue — 1545 Iranistan Ave. (added December 27, 1995) * Black Rock Gardens Historic District — Bounded by Fairfield St., Brewster St. and Nash Ln., including Rowsley and Haddon Sts. (added October 26, 1990) * Black Rock Historic District — Roughly bounded by Black Rock Harbor, Grovers Ave., Beacon and Prescott Sts. (added April 15, 1979) * Bridgeport City Hall — 202 State St. (added October 19, 1977) * Bridgeport Downtown North Historic District — Roughly bounded by Congress


teaching publications

for students, scholars, policy makers, and religious leaders to converse and reflect on issues where religion intersects with civic life. Through academic research, teaching, publications and public initiatives, the Center provides a focus for viewing the role of religion in the public square. The Center sponsors


legendary music

- align center thumb left Facade of legendary music club CBGB (File:CBGB club facade.jpg), New York Early radio support in New York's surrounding Tri state area came from Pat Duncan, who had hosted live punk and hardcore bands weekly on WFMU since 1979.


building+success

-punk groups of the early 1980s and late 1970s, particularly Joy Division, Echo and the Bunnymen and The Smiths. The record was a slow-building success, selling 300,000 copies


amazing career

5111 Web page at Bridgeport Central High School devoted to Al Capp His formal training came from a series of art schools in the New England area. Attending three of them in rapid succession, the impoverished Capp was thrown out of each for nonpayment of tuition—the Boston Museum School of Fine Arts (SMFA), the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and Designers Art School in Boston—the latter before launching his amazing career. Capp had already decided to become a cartoonist


important concentration

of Washington Park, a planned residential development constructed 1850-1900 that contains the city's most important concentration of Victorian architecture * '''Stratfield Historic District''', 300 buildings along Clinton, Brooklawn, and Laurel Avenues that made up an elite residential district of the Edwardian era * '''Barnum-Palliser Development Historic District''', 33 buildings on Austin, Gregory, and Atlantic Streets and Myrtle Avenue that was a planned working-class development


development historic

of Washington Park, a planned residential development constructed 1850-1900 that contains the city's most important concentration of Victorian architecture * '''Stratfield Historic District''', 300 buildings along Clinton, Brooklawn, and Laurel Avenues that made up an elite residential district of the Edwardian era * '''Barnum-Palliser Development Historic District''', 33 buildings on Austin, Gregory, and Atlantic Streets and Myrtle Avenue that was a planned working-class development

Company Building — 1115–1119 Broad St. (added March 21, 1985) * U.S. Post Office (US Post Office-Bridgeport Main) — 120 Middle St. (added April 17, 1986) * West End Congregation—Achavath Achim Synagogue (Achavath Achim Synagogue) — 725 Hancock Ave. (added June 11, 1995) * William D. Bishop Cottage Development Historic District — Cottage Pl. and Atlantic, Broad, Main and Whiting Sts. (added July 28, 1982) * Wilmot Apartments Historic District — Junction of Connecticut and Wilmot Aves


influential+development

UuigWMLVriMC&pg PA113#v onepage&f false pp. 113-114 ). He received formative experience at the Colt armory (Colt's Manufacturing Company) and Pratt & Whitney (Pratt & Whitney Measurement Systems), which were influential development centers for generations of toolmakers (Tool and die maker). August 2, 2001 *National 23-18 American at The Ballpark at Harbor Yard, Bridgeport, Connecticut Mark Millon MVP.


scale including

Department launched a series of raids on January 2, 1920 with follow up operations over the next few days. Smaller raids extended over the next 6 weeks. At least 3000 were arrested, and many others were held for various lengths of time. The entire enterprise replicated the November action on a larger scale, including arrests and seizures without search warrants, as well as detention in overcrowded and unsanitary holding facilities. Hoover later admitted "clear cases of brutality." Murray, 227-9 The raids covered more than 30 cities and towns in 23 states, but those west of the Mississippi and south of the Ohio were "publicity gestures" designed to make the effort appear nationwide in scope. States (cities where available): California (Los Angeles, San Francisco), Colorado (Denver), Connecticut (Ansonia (Ansonia, Connecticut), Bridgeport (Bridgeport, Connecticut), Hartford (Hartford, Connecticut), Meriden (Meriden, Connecticut), New Haven (New Haven, Connecticut), New London (New London, Connecticut), South Manchester (Manchester, Connecticut), Waterbury (Waterbury, Connecticut)), Florida, Illinois (Chicago, Rockford (Rockford, Illinois), East St. Louis (East St. Louis, Illinois)), Indiana, Iowa (Des Moines (Des Moines, Iowa)), Kansas (Kansas City (Kansas City, Kansas)), Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts (Boston, Chelsea (Chelsea, Massachusetts), Brockton (Brockton, Massachusetts), Bridgewater (Bridgewater, Massachusetts), Norwood (Norwood, Massachusetts), Worcester (Worcester, Massachusetts), Springfield (Springfield, Massachusetts), Chicopee Falls (Chicopee, Massachusetts), Holyoke (Holyoke, Massachusetts), Gardner (Gardner, Massachusetts), Fitchburg (Fitchburg, Massachusetts), Lowell (Lowell, Massachusetts), Lawrence (Lawrence, Massachusetts), Haverhill (Haverhill, Massachusetts)), Michigan (Detroit), Minnesota (St. Paul (Saint Paul, Minnesota)), Nebraska (Omaha (Omaha, Nebraska)), New Hampshire (Claremont (Claremont, New Hampshire), Derry (Derry, New Hampshire), Lincoln (Lincoln, New Hampshire), Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire), Nashua (Nashua, New Hampshire), Portsmouth (Portsmouth, New Hampshire)), New Jersey (Camden (Camden, New Jersey)), New York (Buffalo (Buffalo, New York) and "nearby towns", New York City), Ohio (Cleveland, Toledo (Toledo, Ohio), Youngstown (Youngstown, Ohio)), Oregon (Portland (Portland, Oregon)), Pennsylvania (Chester (Chester, Pennsylvania), Pittsburgh), Washington (Spokane (Spokane, Washington)), Wisconsin (Milwaukee, Racine (Racine, Wisconsin)). Others were arrested in West Virginia by agents working from Pittsburgh. Post, 91-2, 96, 104-5, 108, 110, 115-6, 120-1, 124, 126, 131 Because the raids targeted entire organizations, agents arrested everyone found in organization meeting halls, not only arresting non-radical organization members but also visitors who did not belong to a target organization, and sometimes American citizens not eligible for arrest and deportation. Post, 96-147, ''passim'' In a 1973 court case, a federal judge created one of the first mandated quotas when he ruled that half of the Bridgeport, Connecticut Police Department's new employees must be either black or Puerto Rican (Puerto Rico). In 1974, the Department of Justice (United States Department of Justice) and the United Steelworkers of America came to an agreement on the largest-to-then quota program, for steel unions. Dutchess County is part of the Poughkeepsie–Newburgh (Newburgh (city), New York)–Middletown (Middletown, Orange County, New York), NY Metropolitan Statistical Area (Poughkeepsie-Newburgh-Middletown metropolitan area) as well as the larger New York (New York City)–Newark (Newark, New Jersey)–Bridgeport (Bridgeport, Connecticut), NY-NJ (New Jersey)-CT (Connecticut)-PA (Pennsylvania) Combined Statistical Area (New York metropolitan area). "Impy" retired from the bench in 1965. He died of Parkinson's disease on January 29, 1987, at Bridgeport Hospital in Bridgeport, Connecticut. August 2, 2001 *National 23-18 American at The Ballpark at Harbor Yard, Bridgeport, Connecticut Mark Millon MVP.

Bridgeport, Connecticut

'''Bridgeport''' is the most populous city in the state (U.S. state) of Connecticut. Located in Fairfield County (Fairfield County, Connecticut) on the Pequonnock River and Long Island Sound, the city had a population of 144,229 in the 2010 United States Census and is the core of the Greater Bridgeport area.

The city is part of the Greater New York City Combined Statistical Area (New York-Newark-Bridgeport, NY-NJ-CT-PA CSA). It is the fifth-largest city in New England (behind Boston, Worcester (Worcester, Massachusetts), Providence (Providence, Rhode Island) and Springfield (Springfield, Massachusetts)). Bridgeport is the center of the 48th-largest urban area in the United States (List of United States urban areas), just behind Hartford (47th). Much of Bridgeport was originally a part of the township of Stratford (Stratford, Connecticut).

English colonists began settling the city in the 1640s, obtaining land from the Paugussett Indian tribe. The settlement became a center of trade, shipbuilding, and whaling. In the 19th century, the city rapidly industrialized, attracting immigrants to the growing number of factory jobs. Manufacturing was the mainstay of the local economy until the 1970s. Industrial restructuring and suburbanization caused the loss of many jobs and affluent residents, leaving Bridgeport struggling with problems of poverty. In the 21st century, conversion of office and factory buildings to residential use and other redevelopment is attracting new residents.

The circus-promoter and former mayor, P.T. Barnum, was a famous resident of the city. Barnum built three houses there, and housed his circus in town during winters. The first Subway (Subway (restaurant)) restaurant opened in the North End section of the city in 1965.

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