Bouvet Island

What is Bouvet Island known for?


important food

. * January 14 – WWII: Commerce raiding ''hilfskreuzer Pinguin'' (German auxiliary cruiser Pinguin) captures the Norwegian whaling fleet near Bouvet Island, effectively ending Southern Ocean whaling for the duration of the war.


size made

islands and the uncertainty as to whether he had been on Thompson or Liverpool (i.e. Bouvet) Island. Norris's positioning deviating from the correct location combined with the island's lack of a natural harbour and small size made the UK accept the Norwegian claim. Kyvik (2008): 52 This resulted in diplomatic negotiations between the two countries, and in November 1929, Britain renounced its claim to the island. The Hjalmar Riiser-Larsen


photographs covering

the Weddell Sea to the Shackleton Ice Shelf, concentrating on Bouvetøya (Bouvet Island) and the region from Enderby Land to Coats Land. From the seaplane brought on the 1936–1937 expedition, members took 2,200 oblique (:wikt:oblique) aerial photographs (aerial photography), covering . Mrs. Christensen became the first woman to fly over the continent. This list does not mention the mid-ocean (Mid-Atlantic Ridge) islands of St. Helena


physical feature

before landing and hunting 196 seals. In his subsequent lengthy description, Morrell does not mention the island's most obvious physical feature, its permanent ice cover. Mill (1905): 106–107 This has caused some commentators to doubt whether he actually visited the island. Simpson-Housley (1992): 60 On 10 December 1825, SE&S's George Norris, master of the ''Sprightly'', landed on the island,<


wearing black

, Bouvet Island and Balleny (Balleny Islands). Their name derives from the narrow black band under their heads which makes it appear as if they are wearing black helmets, making them one of the most easily identified types of penguin. Other names for them are "Ringed Penguins", "Bearded Penguins", and "Stonecracker Penguins" due to their harsh call. Territories *Bouvet Island ( ), a dependent territories of Norway dependent


legendary quot

1700, but that latitude (he reached 140&nbsp;mi off the north coast of South Georgia) was his farthest south. A determined effort on the part of the French naval officer Jean-Baptiste Charles Bouvet de Lozier to discover the "South Land" – described by a half legendary &quot;sieur de Gonneyville" – resulted in the discovery of Bouvet Island in 54°10′&nbsp;S, and in the navigation of 48° of longitude (48th meridian west) of ice-cumbered sea nearly in 55th


harsh

;!--lows-- Nature thumb NASA (File:Bouvet aerial photo.jpg) image of Bouvet Island from space. The harsh climate and ice-bound terrain limits vegetation to fungi (ascomycetes including lichens) and non-vascular plants (mosses and liverworts). The flora is representative for the maritime Antarctic and is phytogeographically similar to the South Sandwich Islands and South Shetland Islands. Vegetation is limited because of the ice cover, although

, Bouvet Island and Balleny (Balleny Islands). Their name derives from the narrow black band under their heads which makes it appear as if they are wearing black helmets, making them one of the most easily identified types of penguin. Other names for them are "Ringed Penguins", "Bearded Penguins", and "Stonecracker Penguins" due to their harsh call. Territories *Bouvet Island ( ), a dependent territories of Norway dependent

Despite the harsh conditions the islands do support vegetation and are part of the '''Scotia Sea Islands tundra''' ecoregion, along with South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, the South Orkney Islands and Bouvet Island. All these islands lie in the cold seas below the Antarctic convergence. These areas support tundra vegetation consisting of mosses, lichens and algae, while seabirds, penguins and seals feed in the surrounding waters. Chun


history+discovery

, it was declared a Norwegian dependency in 1930. It became a nature reserve in 1971. History Discovery and early sightings thumb left Southeast coast of Bouvet Island in 1898 (File:Bouvet island 0.jpg) The island was discovered on 1 January 1739 by Jean-Baptiste Charles Bouvet de Lozier, commander of the French ships ''Aigle'' and ''Marie''. Mills (2003): 96 This was the first time that land had been spotted south of the 50th parallel south. Bouvet


title making

four climbers (Aaron Halstead, Will Allen, Bruno Rodi and Jason Rodi) were the first humans to climb the highest peak. A time capsule containing the top visions of the future for 2062 was left behind. The next morning, Aaron Halstead led five other climbers (Sarto Blouin, Seth Sherman, Chakib Bouayed, Cindy Sampson, and Akos Hivekovics) to the top.


deep interest

Islands , Prince Edward Islands, Crozet Islands, Île Amsterdam, Île Saint-Paul, Tierra del Fuego and Macquarie Island lie north of the Antarctic Convergence. The Kerguelen Islands lie approximately on the Convergence. The South Shetland Islands, South Orkney Islands, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, Bouvet Island, Heard Island and McDonald Islands all lie south of the Convergence. Christensen had a deep interest in Antarctica

Bouvet Island

'''Bouvet Island''' (Norwegian (Norway): '''Bouvetøya''', previously spelled '''Bouvet-øya''' ) is an uninhabited subantarctic volcanic island and dependency (dependencies of Norway) of Norway located in the South Atlantic Ocean at north of the Princess Astrid Coast of Queen Maud Land, Antarctica.

The island has an area of , of which 93 percent is covered by a glacier. The centre of the island is an ice-filled crater of an inactive volcano. Some skerries (Skerry) and one smaller island, Larsøya, lie along the coast. Nyrøysa, created by a rock slide in the late 1950s, is the only easy place to land and is the location of a weather station.

The island was first spotted on 1 January 1739, by (and was later named for) Jean-Baptiste Charles Bouvet de Lozier. He recorded inaccurate coordinates and the island was not sighted again until 1808, when the British (British people) whaler captain James Lindsay named it '''Lindsay Island'''. http: books.google.co.uk books?id PYdBH4dOOM4C&pg PA96&lpg PA96&dq James+Lindsay+Bouvet&source bl&ots hcE3ANBtqd&sig TQN5iHGaChzt-Nul5bB8zPpF3F0&hl en&sa X&ei gkneUJ7-EqSx0QXx-IHgCg&ved 0CD8Q6AEwAg The first claim of landing, although disputed, was by Benjamin Morrell. In 1825, the island was claimed for the British Crown by George Norris, who named it '''Liverpool Island'''. He also reported Thompson Island (Thompson Island (South Atlantic)) as nearby, although this was later shown to be a phantom island. The first ''Norvegia'' expedition (Hjalmar Riiser-Larsen#The Norvegia expeditions) landed on the island in 1927 and claimed it for Norway. At this time the island was named ''Bouvetøya'', or "Bouvet Island" in Norwegian. An abandoned lifeboat at world’s end After a dispute with the United Kingdom, it was declared a Norwegian dependency in 1930. It became a nature reserve in 1971.

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