Bournemouth

What is Bournemouth known for?


musical called

-Hi'' was made into a musical (musical theatre), called ''Hi-de-Hi - The Holiday Musical'', in the early years of the show. Labelled as a "summer pantomime" by its critics, the production featured most of the TV cast plus several new characters. It did not follow the television storylines, but it was a success nonetheless. It did a summer season in Bournemouth in 1983, a Christmas season in London in 1983 and a summer season in Blackpool in 1984. It was short lived


business home

in the borough, is a local landmark. Bournemouth's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, attracting over five million visitors annually with its beaches and popular nightlife. The town is also a regional centre of business, home of the Bournemouth International Centre or BIC, and a financial sector that is worth more than £1,000 million in Gross Value Added. Toponomy The first record of Bournemouth as a place name was in the Christchurch (Christchurch, Dorset) cartulary of 1407, when a monk noted a stranded whale at "La Bournemowthe"; a purely geographical reference to the uninhabited area around the mouth of the small river that drained the heathland between the towns of Poole and Christchurch. Andrews & Henson (p.7) The word ''bourne'', meaning a small stream, is a derivative of ''burna'', old English for a brook. Edwards (p.24) Ashley & Ashley (p.51) From the latter half of the 16th century "Bourne Mouth" seems to be preferred, being recorded as such in surveys and reports of the period, but this appears to have been shortened to "Bourne" after the area had started to develop. A travel guide published in 1831 calls the place "Bourne Cliffe" or "Tregonwell's Bourne" after its founder. Ashley & Ashley (p.9) ''The Spas of England'', published ten years later, calls it simply "Bourne" Edwards (p.39) as does an 1838 edition of the ''Hampshire Advertiser''. Edwards (p.32) In the late 18th century "Bournemouth" became predominant, although its two-word form appears to have remained in use up until at least the early 20th century, turning up on a 1909 ordnance map. Ashley and Ashley (p.52) Andrews and Henson (p.7) History Wikipedia:Bournemouth Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Dorset Bournemouth Commons:Bournemouth


rock opera

Schoolboy call-up against Wales in 1929 in front of a crowd of around 20,000 at Dean Court, Bournemouth. Wikipedia:Bournemouth Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Dorset Bournemouth Commons:Bournemouth


love life

Wikipedia:Bournemouth Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Dorset Bournemouth Commons:Bournemouth


quot bright

in Bournemouth in 1984. While Bill Owen and Peter Sallis reprised their roles as Compo and Clegg, Brian Wilde chose not to take part because of personal differences with Owen. The show focused on the men's interaction with Clegg's new neighbour, Howard (Kenneth Waller), and his wife, Pearl, played by a local actress. The first act built up to the appearance of Marina (Jean Fergusson), who was in correspondence with Howard. At the end

of the first act, Marina was revealed to be a blonde sexpot. Bright and Ross (2000), pp. 25–26 Howard and Marina's story line was partly based on an early subplot of the television show. In the first series, the librarian, Mr. Wainwright, was having a love affair with his married assistant, Mrs. Partridge. Despite their efforts to keep the plot a secret, especially from Mrs. Partridge's husband, the trio of old men were well aware

of the affair. The summer season reversed the roles: Howard became the married partner, and the challenge was to keep the affair secret from his wife. brook, stream Bournemouth, Eastbourne, http: www.nottingham.ac.uk ~aezins kepn detailpop.php?placeno 7117. Retrieved 3 7 08. Ashbourne (Ashbourne, Derbyshire), Blackburn Mouth (of a river), bay


appearances including

Henry and Victoria Wood (for whom she had immense professional respect, referring to her rival as 'uniquely talented...'). Marti went on to make more television appearances including the self titled ''Marti Caine'' on BBC2; showcasing her dance, comedic and musical talents. Among millions of fans who watched her TV performances could be counted Liberace (who compared her with Barbra Streisand) and her American counterpart Joan Rivers


stage version

replaced the X4 X5 service which used to run between Salisbury and Bath. On Tuesday 22 April 2008 Lyttelton and the ''I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue'' team were due to appear in the stage version of the programme at the Pavilion Theatre (Pavilion Theatre (Bournemouth)) in Bournemouth. Due to his indisposition, his place was taken by Rob Brydon, but a pre-recorded message from Lyttelton was played to the audience ("I'm sorry I can't be with you today as I am in hospital — I wish I'd thought of this sooner!"). The panellists on that night were Tim Brooke-Taylor, Graeme Garden, Barry Cryer and Jeremy Hardy. Wikipedia:Bournemouth Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Dorset Bournemouth Commons:Bournemouth


written critical

Echo should take responsibility for his online alter ego publisher Journalism.co.uk work Editors' Blog accessdate June 5, 2009 * In April 2010 British historian Orlando Figes was discovered to have written critical reviews of books by professional rivals on the Amazon.com website under the names "orlando-birkbeck" and "historian." Richard Lea and Matthew Taylor "Historian Orlando Figes admits posting Amazon reviews that trashed rivals", ''The Guardian'', 23 April 2010 Education Merry del Val lived in England until 1878. His mother's family owned a large villa in Boscombe, a suburb of Bournemouth. He attended a Jesuit (Society of Jesus) preparatory school in Bournemouth at the time the Society was establishing what were to become five parishes and a school. He received his first Holy Communion at Sacred Heart Church on Richmond Hill, and later enrolled at the northern seminary of Ushaw College in County Durham in northern England. He was ordained a priest on 30 October 1888 after receiving a doctorate in philosophy at the Pontifical Gregorian University. He later received a doctorate in theology and then a licentiate in canon law (Canon law (Catholic Church)). Plot Based on Hancock's childhood memories of Bournemouth, the movie is both filmed and set in 1963 in the sleepy fictional seaside town of Piltdown. Hancock plays Wally Pinner, the unhappily married Punch and Judy Man. Wally and the other beach entertainers, the Sandman (John Le Mesurier) who makes sand sculptures, and Neville the photographer (Mario Fabrizi) are socially unacceptable to the town's snobbish elite. '''Michael James Dominic Sweeney''' (born 7 February 1955; Bournemouth, England), best known as '''Jim Sweeney''', is an English (England) actor and comedian, best known for his improvisation (Improvisational comedy) partnership with Steve Steen. fullname Dean Court location Kings Park Bournemouth Dorset England coordinates '''Dean Court''' is a stadium in Bournemouth, England. Primarily used for football (association football), it is the home of League One (Football League One) team A.F.C. Bournemouth. Formerly known as the Fitness First Stadium, from July 2011 the stadium will be renamed the '''Seward Stadium''' after the naming rights were sold to the Seward Motor Group. Wikipedia:Bournemouth Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Dorset Bournemouth Commons:Bournemouth


years taking

a preparatory school (Preparatory school (UK)) Wikipedia:Bournemouth Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Dorset Bournemouth Commons:Bournemouth


small guest

Wikipedia:Bournemouth Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Dorset Bournemouth Commons:Bournemouth

Bournemouth

'''Bournemouth''' World Heritage Site. According to the 2011 census, the town has a population of 183,491 making it the largest settlement in Dorset. With Poole to the west and Christchurch (Christchurch, Dorset) in the east, Bournemouth forms the South East Dorset conurbation, which has a total population of over 400,000.

Before it was founded in 1810 by Lewis Tregonwell, the area was a deserted heathland occasionally visited by fishermen and smugglers. Initially marketed as a health resort, the town received a boost when it appeared in Dr Granville's (Augustus Granville) book, ''The Spas of England''. Bournemouth's growth really accelerated with the arrival of the railway and it became a recognised town in 1870. Historically (Historic counties of England) part of Hampshire, it joined Dorset with the reorganisation of local government in 1974 (Local Government Act 1972). Since 1997, the town has been administered by a unitary authority, giving it autonomy from Dorset County Council although it remains however part of the ceremonial county. The local council is Bournemouth Borough Council.

The town centre has notable Victorian architecture and the spire of St Peter's Church (St Peter's Church, Bournemouth), one of three Grade I listed churches in the borough, is a local landmark. Bournemouth's location has made it a popular destination for tourists, attracting over five million visitors annually with its beaches and popular nightlife. The town is also a regional centre of business, home of the Bournemouth International Centre or BIC, and a financial sector that is worth more than £1,000 million in Gross Value Added.

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