Birmingham, Alabama

What is Birmingham, Alabama known for?


program+cover

of American Football in 1991 and 1992. The team played at Legion Field, and it made the playoffs in both seasons. A popular character among Auburn fans and one of the more animated mascots in the country, Aubie has been on the job since 1979. Aubie's existence began as a cartoon character that first appeared on the Auburn Hardin-Simmons football program cover on October 3, 1959. Birmingham Post-Herald artist Phil Neel created the cartoon Tiger

-1 home record. Auburn's home record during the eighteen years Aubie served as Cover Tiger was 63-16-2. Aubie's regular appearance on the game program cover ended on October 23, 1976, when Auburn downed Florida State (Florida State University), 31-19, but Aubie returned to Auburn’s cover in the Iron Bowl against the Alabama (University of Alabama) on Nov. 30, 1991, Auburn's last home game at Birmingham's (Birmingham, Alabama) Legion Field. birth_date He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


film video

. * Right Rev. William Millsaps is the presiding bishop of the Episcopal Missionary Church, a former chaplain of the University of the South. * Agnes Roberts Coffelt (1922–1992) of Palmer, Tennessee, wife of John Ervin Coffelt, had a noted art gallery named for her in Birmingham, Alabama, from 1993-2001. Agnes (Agnes (gallery)) was a gallery devoted to socially aware photography, short film video and book arts. The gallery exhibited artists from around the world. Agnes

, from 1993-2001. Agnes (Agnes (gallery)) was a gallery devoted to socially aware photography, short film video and book arts. The gallery exhibited artists from around the world. Agnes Coffelt is buried in Fall Creek Cemetery beside her husband. During the late 19th and early 20th centuries children of both races had been raised to accept the status quo of racial segregation. African-American Marshall resident George Dawson (George Dawson (author)) later wrote about his childhood


current major

significant events in the American Civil Rights Movement (African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955-1968)) of the 1950s and 1960s took place. The district was designated by the City of Birmingham in 1992 and covers a six-block area. '''Jerry Wayne Hairston''' (born February 16, 1952 in Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama), Alabama) is a former left fielder in Major League Baseball, and the father of current major leaguers Jerry Hairston, Jr.of the Milwaukee Brewers


community architecture

the hijackers and, after a brief delay, sent the plane, passengers, and crew back to the United States. The hijackers and $2 million stayed in Cuba. David Moos curated an exhibition on Mockbee at the Birmingham Museum of Art in Birmingham, Alabama, which was in its planning stages when Mockbee died. The exhibition was named, ''Samuel Mockbee and the Rural Studio: Community Architecture''. This retrospective was intended to be a celebration, but because of his death, became

a memorial and tribute. ''Samuel Mockbee and the Rural Studio: Community Architecture,'' Samuel Mockbee, David Moos (Editor), Gail Trechsel (Editor), 2003-11-01, Birmingham Museum of Art. ISBN 093139452X - Daniel Payne College Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama) Alabama 1889 Private African Methodist Episcopal Church Closed in 1979 - Alabama *Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama) - WVTM-TV 13 * Huntsville, Alabama Huntsville


popular top

a counterpart to WVOK-AM (WSPZ) 690one of the more popular Top 40 stations of its era. WVOK-FM changed its call letters to WRKK in 1979; it kept its Rock format until 1983, when it became “K99 Country.” Several format changes later, the station is now known in Birmingham as WZRR “Rock 99.5.” Since K98 began broadcast in 1990, it has employed a number of various disk jockeys, including Rick Burgess from the syndicated “Rick and Bubba” radio


scientific publication

between June '92 and early '93, though it wasn't published until 2003. Her first published short story was "Persephone," a dark science-fiction tale, released in 1995. Her most recent scientific publication is a paper on the biostratigraphy of Alabama mosasaurs, published in the ''Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology'' (2002). The St. Louis – San Francisco Railway had two main lines: St. Louis (St. Louis, Missouri) – Tulsa – Oklahoma City and Kansas City (Kansas City, Missouri) – Memphis (Memphis, Tennessee) – Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama). The junction of the two lines was in Springfield, Missouri, home to the company's main shop facility. Other lines included: *Springfield – Kansas City (via Clinton, Missouri) Frye was born in Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama), Alabama. In 1943 he interrupted his studies to enlist in the United States Army and fought at the Battle of the Bulge, winning a Bronze Star (Bronze Star Medal). Frye also fought at the Battle of Remagen. In 1921 (1921 in baseball) a baseball game held at Rickwood Field as part of the Semicentennial of Birmingham, Alabama was played in "old-style" uniforms and according to "the rules of the games as they were in 1872.". "Baseball Fans Given Rare Treat at Wood." (October 26, 1921) ''The Birmingham News'' Since 1996 Rickwood Field has been the site of the annual "Rickwood Classic", a regular season Birmingham Barons game in which both Southern League (Southern League (baseball)) teams wear uniforms honoring some period of their respective histories. The ''Marketplace Morning Report'' is currently hosted by Steve Chiotakis and Jeremy Hobson. Chiotakis was a reporter and host at WBHM, a Public Radio Station in Birmingham, Alabama. Hobson, formerly a reporter in the New York Bureau of ''Marketplace,'' took over from Bill Radke, who had formerly hosted the show and later shared co-hosting duties with Chiotakis. Radke is the former co-host of ''Weekend America''. On October 15, 2010 Radke announced that he would be moving to Seattle to host KIRO-FM Morning News show. '''Kelly Ingram Park''', formerly '''West Park''', He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


medical community

, 2002. Additional purchases were approved that will potentially increase the size of the refuge to 7,300 acres (29.5 km²). Additional negotiations propose an expansion to a potential , most of which currently belongs to private landowners. The facility is unstaffed, but is administered by the Mountain Longleaf National Wildlife Refuge in Anniston, Alabama. Early life Jackson is a son of Dr. Jimmy Jackson, a fixture in the Dickson medical

community who operated (along with his brothers Lawerence and William) the former Goodlark Medical Center (now HCA (Hospital Corporation of America)-owned Horizon Medical Center). Most of the descendants of these three physicians and brothers entered the medical field, but Doug chose instead the study of law following his graduation from Battle Ground Academy in Franklin, Tennessee and Austin Peay State University in Clarksville, Tennessee. Jackson's legal studies were undertaken


numerous diverse

nris Founded in 1951, the '''Birmingham Museum of Art''' in Birmingham, Alabama today has one of the finest collections in the Southeast US, with more than 24,000 paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, and decorative arts representing a numerous diverse cultures, including Asian, European, American (Americas), African, Pre-Columbian, and Native American (Indigenous peoples of the Americas). Among other highlights, the Museum’s collection of Asian art


game appearances

be the first road and bowl game appearances for the Wreck in its illustrious career. He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


fiction writing

moved to the United States as a small child with her mother. Much of her childhood was spent in the small town of Leeds, Alabama, and her early interests included herpetology, paleontology, and fiction writing. As a teenager, she lived in Trussville, Alabama, and, in high school, began doing volunteer work at the Red Mountain Museum (Red Mountain, Birmingham, Alabama#Red Mountain Museum) in Birmingham, Alabama and spending summers on her first archaeological and paleontological digs. Kiernan attended college at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Colorado at Boulder, studying geology and vertebrate paleontology, and she held both museum and teaching positions before finally turning to fiction writing in 1992. In 1988, she co-authored a paper describing the new genus and species of mosasaur, ''Selmasaurus russelli''. Her first novel, ''The Five of Cups'', was written between June '92 and early '93, though it wasn't published until 2003. Her first published short story was "Persephone," a dark science-fiction tale, released in 1995. Her most recent scientific publication is a paper on the biostratigraphy of Alabama mosasaurs, published in the ''Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology'' (2002). The St. Louis – San Francisco Railway had two main lines: St. Louis (St. Louis, Missouri) – Tulsa – Oklahoma City and Kansas City (Kansas City, Missouri) – Memphis (Memphis, Tennessee) – Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama). The junction of the two lines was in Springfield, Missouri, home to the company's main shop facility. Other lines included: *Springfield – Kansas City (via Clinton, Missouri) Frye was born in Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama), Alabama. In 1943 he interrupted his studies to enlist in the United States Army and fought at the Battle of the Bulge, winning a Bronze Star (Bronze Star Medal). Frye also fought at the Battle of Remagen. In 1921 (1921 in baseball) a baseball game held at Rickwood Field as part of the Semicentennial of Birmingham, Alabama was played in "old-style" uniforms and according to "the rules of the games as they were in 1872.". "Baseball Fans Given Rare Treat at Wood." (October 26, 1921) ''The Birmingham News'' Since 1996 Rickwood Field has been the site of the annual "Rickwood Classic", a regular season Birmingham Barons game in which both Southern League (Southern League (baseball)) teams wear uniforms honoring some period of their respective histories. The ''Marketplace Morning Report'' is currently hosted by Steve Chiotakis and Jeremy Hobson. Chiotakis was a reporter and host at WBHM, a Public Radio Station in Birmingham, Alabama. Hobson, formerly a reporter in the New York Bureau of ''Marketplace,'' took over from Bill Radke, who had formerly hosted the show and later shared co-hosting duties with Chiotakis. Radke is the former co-host of ''Weekend America''. On October 15, 2010 Radke announced that he would be moving to Seattle to host KIRO-FM Morning News show. '''Kelly Ingram Park''', formerly '''West Park''', He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.

Birmingham, Alabama

'''Birmingham''' ( ) is the largest city in Alabama. The city is the county seat of Jefferson County (Jefferson County, Alabama). The city's population was 212,237 according to the 2010 United States Census. U.S. Census Bureau Delivers Alabama's 2010 Census Population Totals, 2010.census.gov The Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Statistical Area (Birmingham–Hoover Metropolitan Area) had a population of about 1,128,047 according to the 2010 Census, which is approximately one quarter of Alabama's population.

Birmingham was founded in 1871, during the post-Civil War (American Civil War) Reconstruction period (Reconstruction Era of the United States), through the merger of three pre-existing farm towns, notably, former Elyton (Elyton, Alabama). It grew from there, annexing (annexation) many more of its smaller neighbors, into an industrial and railroad transportation (rail transportation) center with a focus on mining, the iron and steel industry (steel), and railroading. Birmingham was named for Birmingham, England, United Kingdom; one of the UK's major industrial cities. Many, if not most, of the original settlers who founded Birmingham were of English ancestry (English American). In one writer's view, the city was planned as a place where cheap, non-unionized, and African-American labor from rural Alabama could be employed in the city's steel mills and blast furnaces, giving it a competitive advantage over industrial cities in the Midwest and Northeast (Northeastern United States). The Most Segregated City in America: City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980, p. 14.

From its founding through the end of the 1960s, Birmingham was a primary industrial center of the South (Southern United States). The pace of Birmingham's growth during the period from 1881 through 1920 earned its nicknames ''The Magic City'' and ''The Pittsburgh of the South''. Much like Pittsburgh, Birmingham's major industries were iron and steel production, plus a major component of the railroading industry, where rails and railroad cars were both manufactured in Birmingham. In the field of railroading, the two primary hubs of railroading in the Deep South were nearby Atlanta and Birmingham, beginning in the 1860s and continuing through to the present day. The economy diversified during the later half of the twentieth century. Though the manufacturing industry maintains a strong presence in Birmingham, other businesses and industries such as banking, telecommunications, transportation, electrical power transmission, medical care, college education, and insurance have risen in stature. Mining in the Birmingham area is no longer a major industry with the exception of coal mining. Birmingham ranks as one of the most important business centers in the Southeastern United States and is also one of the largest banking centers in the United States. In addition, the Birmingham area serves as headquarters to one Fortune 500 company: Regions Financial, along with five other Fortune 1000 companies.

In higher education, Birmingham has been the location of the University of Alabama School of Medicine (formerly the Medical College of Alabama) and the University of Alabama School of Dentistry since 1947. Since that time it has also obtained a campus of the University of Alabama, University of Alabama at Birmingham (founded circa 1969), one of three main campuses of the University of Alabama System. It is also home to three private institutions: Samford University, Birmingham-Southern College, and Miles College. Between these colleges and universities, the Birmingham area has major colleges of medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, law, engineering, and nursing. The city has three of the state's five law schools: Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham School of Law, and Miles Law School. Birmingham is also the headquarters of the Southeastern Conference, one of the major U.S. collegiate athletic conferences.

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