Birmingham, Alabama

What is Birmingham, Alabama known for?


fiction writing

moved to the United States as a small child with her mother. Much of her childhood was spent in the small town of Leeds, Alabama, and her early interests included herpetology, paleontology, and fiction writing. As a teenager, she lived in Trussville, Alabama, and, in high school, began doing volunteer work at the Red Mountain Museum (Red Mountain, Birmingham, Alabama#Red Mountain Museum) in Birmingham, Alabama and spending summers on her first archaeological and paleontological digs. Kiernan attended college at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of Colorado at Boulder, studying geology and vertebrate paleontology, and she held both museum and teaching positions before finally turning to fiction writing in 1992. In 1988, she co-authored a paper describing the new genus and species of mosasaur, ''Selmasaurus russelli''. Her first novel, ''The Five of Cups'', was written between June '92 and early '93, though it wasn't published until 2003. Her first published short story was "Persephone," a dark science-fiction tale, released in 1995. Her most recent scientific publication is a paper on the biostratigraphy of Alabama mosasaurs, published in the ''Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology'' (2002). The St. Louis – San Francisco Railway had two main lines: St. Louis (St. Louis, Missouri) – Tulsa – Oklahoma City and Kansas City (Kansas City, Missouri) – Memphis (Memphis, Tennessee) – Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama). The junction of the two lines was in Springfield, Missouri, home to the company's main shop facility. Other lines included: *Springfield – Kansas City (via Clinton, Missouri) Frye was born in Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama), Alabama. In 1943 he interrupted his studies to enlist in the United States Army and fought at the Battle of the Bulge, winning a Bronze Star (Bronze Star Medal). Frye also fought at the Battle of Remagen. In 1921 (1921 in baseball) a baseball game held at Rickwood Field as part of the Semicentennial of Birmingham, Alabama was played in "old-style" uniforms and according to "the rules of the games as they were in 1872.". "Baseball Fans Given Rare Treat at Wood." (October 26, 1921) ''The Birmingham News'' Since 1996 Rickwood Field has been the site of the annual "Rickwood Classic", a regular season Birmingham Barons game in which both Southern League (Southern League (baseball)) teams wear uniforms honoring some period of their respective histories. The ''Marketplace Morning Report'' is currently hosted by Steve Chiotakis and Jeremy Hobson. Chiotakis was a reporter and host at WBHM, a Public Radio Station in Birmingham, Alabama. Hobson, formerly a reporter in the New York Bureau of ''Marketplace,'' took over from Bill Radke, who had formerly hosted the show and later shared co-hosting duties with Chiotakis. Radke is the former co-host of ''Weekend America''. On October 15, 2010 Radke announced that he would be moving to Seattle to host KIRO-FM Morning News show. '''Kelly Ingram Park''', formerly '''West Park''', He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


quot books

Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama), Alabama location_country United States '''Books-A-Million, Inc.''', also known as '''BAM!''', is a company that owns the second largest U.S. bookstore chain and is headquartered in Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama), Alabama. "Welcome to Books-A-Million, Inc." Books-A-Million. Retrieved on January 18, 2011. "Corporate Office Books-A-Million, Inc. 402 Industrial Lane Birmingham, Alabama 35211


guitar prowess

, the album quickly peaked at number seventeen on the ''Billboard'' 200 chart. The CD DVD received conservative, although consistent, praise, with critics torn between his pop-idol image, and (at the time) emerging guitar prowess. Erik Crawford (of Allmusic) asked "Is he the consummate guitar hero exemplified when he plays a cover of Stevie Ray Vaughan's 'Lenny', or is he the teen idol that the pubescent girls shriek for after he plays 'Your Body Is a Wonderland?'" Crawford, Erik


album beautiful

; Lubbock, Texas; Memphis, Tennessee; Norfolk, Virginia; Orlando, Florida; Phoenix, Arizona; Portsmouth, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Salt Lake City, Utah (Salt Lake City); and Waco, Texas. '''Vallejo''' is a rock band based in Austin, Texas, but formed in El Campo (El Campo, Texas), Texas and Alabaster, Alabama, a suburb of Birmingham, Alabama. Albums include their self-titled 1997 debut and '' Beautiful Life (Vallejo album) Beautiful Life


fiction work

Rights Revolution '' (Simon & Schuster, 2001), was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction and the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize in 2002.


numerous art

in U.S. history publisher The Birmingham News on al.com date November 10, 2011 accessdate November 10, 2011 Culture Birmingham is the cultural and entertainment capital of Alabama with numerous art galleries in the area including the Birmingham Museum of Art, the largest art museum in the Southeast. Downtown Birmingham is currently experiencing a cultural and economic rejuvenation, with several new independent shops and restaurants opening in the area. Birmingham is also home to the state's major ballet, opera, and symphony orchestra companies such the Alabama Ballet, alabamaballet.org Alabama Symphony Orchestra, Birmingham Ballet, Birmingham Concert Chorale, and Opera Birmingham. thumb The Alabama Theatre (File:Alabama Theatre.jpg) in 2010 * The historic Alabama Theatre hosts film screenings, concerts and performances. * The Alys Stephens Center for the Performing Arts is home to Alabama Symphony Orchestra and Opera Birmingham as well as several series of concerts and lectures. It is located on the campus of the University of Alabama at Birmingham. * The Birmingham-Jefferson Convention Complex (BJCC), houses a theater, concert hall, exhibition halls, and a sports and concert arena. The BJCC is home to the Birmingham Children's Theatre, He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


series running

also owns the primary newspapers in Birmingham, Alabama and Huntsville, Alabama. Alabama * Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama) (Birmingham International Airport (Birmingham-Shuttlesworth International Airport)) Arkansas In the late 1990s Schwantz ran a couple of seasons of the Australian NASCAR Championship before returning home to the USA where for several years he competed in the NASCAR Busch Series, running 18 races with 2 top tens, and touring car races.<


numerous diverse

nris Founded in 1951, the '''Birmingham Museum of Art''' in Birmingham, Alabama today has one of the finest collections in the Southeast US, with more than 24,000 paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, and decorative arts representing a numerous diverse cultures, including Asian, European, American (Americas), African, Pre-Columbian, and Native American (Indigenous peoples of the Americas). Among other highlights, the Museum’s collection of Asian art


television made

of Hugo Black. On April 6, 2006, Media General announced it would sell KIMT as part of the company's acquisition of four NBC owned-and-operated stations. "Media General to Acquire Four NBC Owned and Operated Television Stations", Media General, April 6, 2006 On August 2, New Vision Television made public it had bought KIMT and sister station WIAT in Birmingham, Alabama for $ (United States dollar)35 million. That company's acquisition of the two outlets was finalized on October 12, 2006. "Media General Completes Sale of WIAT-TV in Birmingham, Ala., and KIMT-TV in Mason City, Iowa, to New Vision Television", Media General, October 12, 2006 As part of the analog to digital transition (Digital television transition in the United States) in 2009, the station opted to keep its analog channel on-air until the revised June 12 deadline. "Analog Turn Off Delayed", KIMT News, February 9, 2009 After the transition (which occurred at 12:12 p.m.), KIMT planned to continue using digital channel 42 and filed paperwork with the FCC to eventually increase that signal's output power from 200 to 800 kW (kilowatt) which would more effectively fill its coverage footprint. Early in the morning on June 27, 1995, KIMT news anchor Jodi Huisentruit was abducted outside her apartment while on her way to work. She has not been found and the case remains unsolved to this day. '''Red Diamond Inc.''' is a coffee, tea, and food service company headquartered in Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama), Alabama. Red Diamond, founded in 1906, is one of the three oldest coffee and teas companies in the United States and has continuously been operated by members of the same family. '''Clarence Eugene Davis''' (born June 28, 1949 in Birmingham, Alabama) is a former American football running back who played with the National Football League's Oakland Raiders from 1971 to 1978. birth_date He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


violent opposition

Hill." Independent Klan groups remained active in Birmingham and were deeply engaged in violent opposition to the Civil Rights Movement. Diane McWhorter, ''Carry Me Home: Birmingham, Alabama, The Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution'', New York: Touchstone Book, 2002, p. 75. * 1960 &ndash; The Anne Frank House opens in Amsterdam, Netherlands. *1963 &ndash; The police force in Birmingham, Alabama switches tactics and responds with violent force (Birmingham campaign#Fire hoses and police dogs) to stop the "Birmingham campaign" protesters. Images of the violent suppression are transmitted worldwide, bringing newfound attention to the African-American Civil Rights Movement (African-American Civil Rights Movement (1955–1968)). *1973 &ndash; The 108-story Sears Tower in Chicago is topped out at 1.451 feet as the world's tallest building. *2002 &ndash; In Washington, D.C., the remains of the missing Chandra Levy are found in Rock Creek Park. * 2002 &ndash; American civil rights movement: a jury in Birmingham, Alabama, convicts former Ku Klux Klan member Bobby Frank Cherry of the 1963 murders of four girls in the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church (16th Street Baptist Church bombing). *2003 &ndash; In Fort Worth, Texas, Annika Sörenstam becomes the first woman to play the PGA Tour in 58 years. He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.

Birmingham, Alabama

'''Birmingham''' ( ) is the largest city in Alabama. The city is the county seat of Jefferson County (Jefferson County, Alabama). The city's population was 212,237 according to the 2010 United States Census. U.S. Census Bureau Delivers Alabama's 2010 Census Population Totals, 2010.census.gov The Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Statistical Area (Birmingham–Hoover Metropolitan Area) had a population of about 1,128,047 according to the 2010 Census, which is approximately one quarter of Alabama's population.

Birmingham was founded in 1871, during the post-Civil War (American Civil War) Reconstruction period (Reconstruction Era of the United States), through the merger of three pre-existing farm towns, notably, former Elyton (Elyton, Alabama). It grew from there, annexing (annexation) many more of its smaller neighbors, into an industrial and railroad transportation (rail transportation) center with a focus on mining, the iron and steel industry (steel), and railroading. Birmingham was named for Birmingham, England, United Kingdom; one of the UK's major industrial cities. Many, if not most, of the original settlers who founded Birmingham were of English ancestry (English American). In one writer's view, the city was planned as a place where cheap, non-unionized, and African-American labor from rural Alabama could be employed in the city's steel mills and blast furnaces, giving it a competitive advantage over industrial cities in the Midwest and Northeast (Northeastern United States). The Most Segregated City in America: City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980, p. 14.

From its founding through the end of the 1960s, Birmingham was a primary industrial center of the South (Southern United States). The pace of Birmingham's growth during the period from 1881 through 1920 earned its nicknames ''The Magic City'' and ''The Pittsburgh of the South''. Much like Pittsburgh, Birmingham's major industries were iron and steel production, plus a major component of the railroading industry, where rails and railroad cars were both manufactured in Birmingham. In the field of railroading, the two primary hubs of railroading in the Deep South were nearby Atlanta and Birmingham, beginning in the 1860s and continuing through to the present day. The economy diversified during the later half of the twentieth century. Though the manufacturing industry maintains a strong presence in Birmingham, other businesses and industries such as banking, telecommunications, transportation, electrical power transmission, medical care, college education, and insurance have risen in stature. Mining in the Birmingham area is no longer a major industry with the exception of coal mining. Birmingham ranks as one of the most important business centers in the Southeastern United States and is also one of the largest banking centers in the United States. In addition, the Birmingham area serves as headquarters to one Fortune 500 company: Regions Financial, along with five other Fortune 1000 companies.

In higher education, Birmingham has been the location of the University of Alabama School of Medicine (formerly the Medical College of Alabama) and the University of Alabama School of Dentistry since 1947. Since that time it has also obtained a campus of the University of Alabama, University of Alabama at Birmingham (founded circa 1969), one of three main campuses of the University of Alabama System. It is also home to three private institutions: Samford University, Birmingham-Southern College, and Miles College. Between these colleges and universities, the Birmingham area has major colleges of medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, law, engineering, and nursing. The city has three of the state's five law schools: Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham School of Law, and Miles Law School. Birmingham is also the headquarters of the Southeastern Conference, one of the major U.S. collegiate athletic conferences.

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