Birmingham, Alabama

What is Birmingham, Alabama known for?


landscape designs

of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


music accomplishments

has become one of the largest music accomplishments to the state of Alabama. '''Alabama Adventure''' is an Alabama amusement park, located off Interstate 20 59 (Interstate 59) in Bessemer (Bessemer, Alabama), just west of Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama) and east of Tuscaloosa (Tuscaloosa, Alabama). It is owned by General Attractions LLC. He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


projects studies

http: www.gomdot.com Home Projects Studies Northern US78 pdf ProjectInformation.pdf title Interstate 69, Section of Independent Utility #9, Final Environmental Impact Statement date June 28, 2006 publisher Mississippi Department of Transportation page 32 accessdate July 8, 2010 and Interstate 240 (Interstate 240 (Tennessee)) are the two possibilities. As the season progressed, attendance dropped below 1,000 fans per game, fueling speculation the Condors would fold


including television

, were announced as the Top 3 finalists. On May 12, Idol producers brought Hicks to Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama) for a weekend of promotional events including television interviews for the local Fox affiliate (WBRC), a downtown parade, concerts, and an audience with Governor Bob Riley (Bob Riley (Alabama)). He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


small colorful

of Alabama Crimson Tide Sports Network (football only), the UAB Blazers Radio Network (baseball only) , Tennessee Titans Radio and Fox Sports Radio. It formerly was the broadcast home of the Birmingham Barons. The '''watercress darter''' is a small colorful fish which lives in the Black Warrior River drainage basin near Birmingham, Alabama. The largest known female is 2.5 inches in length. It was declared an Endangered


growing collection

, Atlanta (Atlanta, Georgia), Birmingham (Birmingham, Alabama), and New Orleans (New Orleans, Louisiana). The Amtrak station (Toccoa (Amtrak station)) is situated at 47 North Alexander St. The picture to the left is how the station appeared prior to the extension of the Currahee Military Museum, which was built to house the Aldebourne Stables and a growing collection of artifacts. That extension was subsequently enlarged in 2009 to include a community room and gift shop. A monument


numerous cultural

Superspeedway International Motorsports Hall of Fame museum. South of downtown, on Red Mountain (Red Mountain (Alabama)), Vulcan Park features the world's largest cast iron statue (Vulcan statue), depicting Vulcan at his forge. It was cast for the 1904 St. Louis Exposition (Louisiana Purchase Exposition), and erected at Vulcan Park in 1938. Festivals thumb The Sloss Furnaces (File:Sloss Furnaces Birmingham.jpg) Birmingham is home to numerous cultural festivals showcasing


including song

the group five Dove Award nominations, including Song of the Year for "How You Live (Turn Up The Music)", Group of the Year and Artist of the Year. "How You Live" was released to country radio in April 2008, entering the country charts at #56. Redfield grew up in a rural area near Birmingham, Alabama. As a young man, he studied Eastern philosophies (Eastern philosophy), including Taoism and Zen, while majoring in sociology at Auburn University. He later received a Master's degree in counseling and spent more than 15 years as a therapist to abused adolescents. During this time, he was drawn into the human potential movement and turned to it for theories about intuitions and psychic phenomena that would help his clients. - align center 8 Mar 30, 2005 He entered the Army on September 1, 1942, and was a member of the 2nd Battalion, 29th Quartermaster Regiment. He was a passenger aboard the Dutch (Netherlands) steamer USAT ''s'Jacob'' (SS s'Jacob) on March 8, 1943, which was near Porlock Harbor (Porlock Bay, Papua New Guinea), New Guinea, when the ship was hit by Japanese bombers. 125px right thumb City plan of Birmingham, Alabama drawn by Warren Manning. (Image:Birmingham District copy.jpg) In 1919, Manning’s talents took him to Birmingham, Alabama, where he worked on a new design for the city. He recommended a radical resource-based plan which included “multiple neighborhood-based centers determined by available resources” (Karson, 2001). He also makes note of the importance of parks throughout the city stating that “the cities that are best designed have about one-eight of their area in parks and about one acre to 75 people” (Manning, 1919). This approach was in direct contrast to the then popular City Beautiful movement which emphasized monumental civic centers and Beaux Arts architecture style public buildings (Karson, 2001). The architectural design of the Chicago Columbian Exposition was based in the City Beautiful movement, but now, on his own, Manning decided on a different course following his own landscape theories which were based on the natural available resources. This idea was the basis for his creation of the “wild garden” which he applied to many of his landscape designs.


guitar prowess

, the album quickly peaked at number seventeen on the ''Billboard'' 200 chart. The CD DVD received conservative, although consistent, praise, with critics torn between his pop-idol image, and (at the time) emerging guitar prowess. Erik Crawford (of Allmusic) asked "Is he the consummate guitar hero exemplified when he plays a cover of Stevie Ray Vaughan's 'Lenny', or is he the teen idol that the pubescent girls shriek for after he plays 'Your Body Is a Wonderland?'" Crawford, Erik


team study

http: www.bizjournals.com title bizjournals.com work Business Journals date July 4, 2012 accessdate 2012-07-14 calculated Birmingham's "combined personal income" (the sum of all money earned by all residents of an area in a year) at $48.1 billion.

Birmingham, Alabama

'''Birmingham''' ( ) is the largest city in Alabama. The city is the county seat of Jefferson County (Jefferson County, Alabama). The city's population was 212,237 according to the 2010 United States Census. U.S. Census Bureau Delivers Alabama's 2010 Census Population Totals, 2010.census.gov The Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Statistical Area (Birmingham–Hoover Metropolitan Area) had a population of about 1,128,047 according to the 2010 Census, which is approximately one quarter of Alabama's population.

Birmingham was founded in 1871, during the post-Civil War (American Civil War) Reconstruction period (Reconstruction Era of the United States), through the merger of three pre-existing farm towns, notably, former Elyton (Elyton, Alabama). It grew from there, annexing (annexation) many more of its smaller neighbors, into an industrial and railroad transportation (rail transportation) center with a focus on mining, the iron and steel industry (steel), and railroading. Birmingham was named for Birmingham, England, United Kingdom; one of the UK's major industrial cities. Many, if not most, of the original settlers who founded Birmingham were of English ancestry (English American). In one writer's view, the city was planned as a place where cheap, non-unionized, and African-American labor from rural Alabama could be employed in the city's steel mills and blast furnaces, giving it a competitive advantage over industrial cities in the Midwest and Northeast (Northeastern United States). The Most Segregated City in America: City Planning and Civil Rights in Birmingham, 1920–1980, p. 14.

From its founding through the end of the 1960s, Birmingham was a primary industrial center of the South (Southern United States). The pace of Birmingham's growth during the period from 1881 through 1920 earned its nicknames ''The Magic City'' and ''The Pittsburgh of the South''. Much like Pittsburgh, Birmingham's major industries were iron and steel production, plus a major component of the railroading industry, where rails and railroad cars were both manufactured in Birmingham. In the field of railroading, the two primary hubs of railroading in the Deep South were nearby Atlanta and Birmingham, beginning in the 1860s and continuing through to the present day. The economy diversified during the later half of the twentieth century. Though the manufacturing industry maintains a strong presence in Birmingham, other businesses and industries such as banking, telecommunications, transportation, electrical power transmission, medical care, college education, and insurance have risen in stature. Mining in the Birmingham area is no longer a major industry with the exception of coal mining. Birmingham ranks as one of the most important business centers in the Southeastern United States and is also one of the largest banking centers in the United States. In addition, the Birmingham area serves as headquarters to one Fortune 500 company: Regions Financial, along with five other Fortune 1000 companies.

In higher education, Birmingham has been the location of the University of Alabama School of Medicine (formerly the Medical College of Alabama) and the University of Alabama School of Dentistry since 1947. Since that time it has also obtained a campus of the University of Alabama, University of Alabama at Birmingham (founded circa 1969), one of three main campuses of the University of Alabama System. It is also home to three private institutions: Samford University, Birmingham-Southern College, and Miles College. Between these colleges and universities, the Birmingham area has major colleges of medicine, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, law, engineering, and nursing. The city has three of the state's five law schools: Cumberland School of Law, Birmingham School of Law, and Miles Law School. Birmingham is also the headquarters of the Southeastern Conference, one of the major U.S. collegiate athletic conferences.

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