Beit Jala

What is Beit Jala known for?


title home

;


century modern

of Statistics . Economy Cremisan Cellars, located in the Cremisan monastery, is an important local winemaker. The winery has operated since the establishment of the monastery in the 19th century. Modern equipment was introduced in 1997.


322

, J. Nourse, and J. Rivington (Pococke, 1745, vol 2, p. 45; cited in Robinson and Smith, 1841, vol 2, p. 322) *

and Arabia Petraea: A Journal of Travels in the year 1838 location Boston publisher Crocker & Brewster volume 1 (p. 322 ) *

in the year 1838 location Boston publisher Crocker & Brewster volume 2 (p. 322 ff ) * *


studies title

, according to a census conducted by the Israeli Army Command, the population was 6,041.


historic community

Palestinians lost their homes to the Israelis, according to the historian Sami Hadawi.


open amp

an Israeli soldier near Shavei Shomron.open&of ENG-ISR *15 January: Israeli woman shot dead by an AMB gunman in Jerusalem. An American citizen living in Israel is kidnapped at a Palestinian security checkpoint in Beit Jala. He was then taken to Nablus and shot dead there. *16 January: An Palestinian (Palestinian people) resident of Jerusalem is killed while


local resistance

refused to seriously answer his questions and mocked the authority of the Ottoman sultan, marking a notable episode of initial local resistance to the Ottoman taxation methods and procedures. By the end of the 16th century, Beit Jala was almost entirely inhabited by Christians, with a population of 239 Christian adult males and six Muslim adult males. Beit Jala's size rendered it similar to that of a town, with the village being subdivided into four quarters. Singer, 1994, p. 80 The village produced more wheat and barley than surrounding localities and like other villages south of Jerusalem, grape cultivation was greater than olive cultivation. Beit Jala was taxed on these agricultural products as well as figs, honeybees, and goats. It contained one of the six olive presses in the subdistrict of Jerusalem in the 16th century. Despite its large size, Beit Jala was relatively poorer than other villages in the subdistrict. Singer, 1994 pp. 81-82. Beit Jala's inhabitants participated in the 1834 peasants' revolt in Palestine (1834 Arab revolt in Palestine) against Ibrahim Pasha (Ibrahim Pasha of Egypt), the Egyptian (Muhammad Ali Dynasty) governor of Syria (Ottoman Syria). Beit Jala's residents were believed to have taken part in the looting of Egyptian property and on 31 May, Egyptian troops assaulted the village. Ibrahim Pasha put a stop to the attack, but at least 33 men and women were killed in the attack. In addition, the village's livestock was seized. The attack on Beit Jala prompted rebels from the Ta'amira tribe, a local Bedouin tribe, to enter into Bethlehem to help bolster its defense. Thomson, 1860, p. 647. In 1838, there were roughly 1,000 Greek Orthodox and 200 Catholic Christians living in Beit Jala, but by the mid-19th century, there were 10 Catholics. The Latin Patriarchate founded its first parish in Palestine in Beit Jala in 1853. Kildani, 2010, p. 320 The establishment of the parish faced fierce resistance by the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate and the inhabitants of Beit Jala, leading to several skirmishes and official complaints to the Ottoman authorities by both sides. Kildani, 2010, pp. 324-325. A Latin church was built in Beit Jala and inaugurated on 18 April 1858. Kildani, 2010, p. 326 The Jerusalem Society, a Protestant movement struggled to maintain a presence in Beit Jala in the late 19th century. When a clash between Orthodox and Protestant residents ended with the death of an Orthodox girl, the village's Protestant community was evacuated to al-Karak in Transjordan (Transjordan (region)) for six months until compensation (blood money (restitution)) was paid to family of the slain girl. Kildani, 2010, p. 558 In 1866, the Russian ambassador to the Ottoman Empire purchased land in Beit Jala and built a girls' school, the first Russian school to be built in Palestine. It had 60 pupils by 1880 and was assigned a Russian principal. In 1886, it became a teachers' training school and was under the administration of the Palestinian Orthodox Imperial Society. Kildani, 2010, p. 343 In 1883, the Palestine Exploration Fund's ''Survey of Western Palestine'' (SWP) described ''Beit Jala'' as: "A large and flourishing village of white well-built stone houses, on the slope of a steep hill. The water supply is artificial, with a well in the valley below. The population is said by Pere Lievin to amount to 3,000, of whom 420 are Catholics, and the rest Orthodox Greeks. There is a Greek and a Latin church in the village. There are remarkably fine groves of olives round and beneath the village, and the hill is covered with vineyards which belong to the place." Conder and Kitchener, 1883, SWP III, p. 20 British Mandate era In 1945 the population of Beit Jala was 3,710 Arabs, with 13,307 (rural) and 737 (urban) dunams of land according to an official land and population survey. Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. ''Village Statistics, April, 1945.'' Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 56 9,860 dunams were plantations and irrigable land, 1,064 for cereals, Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. ''Village Statistics, April, 1945.'' Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 101 while 737 dunams were built-up (urban) land. Government of Palestine, Department of Statistics. ''Village Statistics, April, 1945.'' Quoted in Hadawi, 1970, p. 151 Jordanian and Israeli rule


important local

of Statistics . Economy Cremisan Cellars, located in the Cremisan monastery, is an important local winemaker. The winery has operated since the establishment of the monastery in the 19th century. Modern equipment was introduced in 1997.


political role

the-ravaged-palace-that-symbolizes-the-hope-of-peace-2266960.html The ravaged palace that symbolizes the hope of peace According to John Bunzl, the Israeli press used the incident to suggest there was a Christian-Muslim conflict in the incidents, with the former trying to prevent an attack until the Muslims forced them to surrender. Numerous statements taken from Christian residents appear to refute this. John Bunzl,''Islam, Judaism, and the Political Role of Religions


international series

London publisher Committee of the Palestine Exploration Fund (Palestine Exploration Fund) volume 3 * (p. 915) *

Beit Jala

'''Beit Jala''' ( altitude. In 2007, Beit Jala had 11,758 inhabitants according to the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics. About 75% of the population were Christian (Palestinian Christians)s (mostly Greek Orthodox) and about 25% Muslims. thumbnail Map of the Beit Jala region (File:Walaja Barrier 2011.jpg)

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