Barrhead, Alberta

What is Barrhead, Alberta known for?


low

to September. The Great Blue Heron is another prominent figure in local lore, is often spotted along the shores of the Paddle River and local lakes, and is the town's official animal. A statue of the bird is situated next to the Community Gazebo that marks the town centre and miniatures of the bird adorn the street posts. The area was a quiet land of rolling hills well covered with stands of poplar, birch, pine and spruce trees on the higher ground with the low areas filled

and east of town there are low flatlands and river-lands and to the west of town there is the areas main recreational area, Thunder Lake Provincial Park approximately west of the town. The Thunder Lake is very popular for boating, fishing and camping and is home to many residents from other areas of the province during the summer months. The northern parts of the Barrhead region contain thick stands of spruce, pine and tamarack. Throughout the county of Barrhead

, and August and for a few months a year drop as low as −50 degrees Celsius. Rainfall is moderate, with the majority falling during the summer months. The area is noticeably wetter than in surrounding regions, particularly to the south and east. Around a metre of snow falls on the region during winter. During the summer solstice, twilight extends throughout the night and during the winter, night comes quickly. However, the town gets to experience beautiful displays of the Aurora borealis


current member

of the House, MLA and former deputy Premier (past resident) *Allan Measures, retired ice hockey player from the SM-liiga in Finland, drafted by Vancouver Canucks External links *


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MDT (Mountain Daylight Time) utc_offset_DST −6 latd 54 latm 07 lats 23 latNS N longd 114 longm 24 longs 07 longEW W elevation_footnotes

website www.barrhead.ca

and Highway 661 (Alberta Highway 661). It is approximately northeast of Whitecourt (Whitecourt, Alberta). - Barrhead (Healthcare Centre) CHC3 Private Barrhead Healthcare Centre Barrhead (Barrhead, Alberta) AB (Alberta)


beautiful location


single line

and this helps with the dark.


agricultural activities

needed date September 2011 Economy The major industries that support Barrhead's economy are oil and gas (natural gas), forestry, and agriculture. Dairy, sheep, livestock, wheat, and fruit crops are examples of the types of agricultural

activities in the area. east of the Hamlet of Kinuso (Kinuso, Alberta) and proceeds south through Swan Hills (Swan Hills, Alberta) and Barrhead (Barrhead, Alberta) to Highway 43 (Alberta Highway 43) near Gunn (Gunn, Alberta). location Barrhead County No. 11 (Barrhead County No. 11, Alberta), Alberta, Canada nearest_city Barrhead (Barrhead, Alberta), Edmonton (Edmonton, Alberta) lat_d 54


quot beautiful


story building

in 1928 and then moved to Thunder Lake in 1967. thumb left alt Main Street, Barrhead Main Street, Barrhead (Image:Barrhead old 1.jpg) The Paddle River Co-operative Society was formed in 1912 and opened a store in the old Johnstone building northeast of Barrhead in 1913. They immediately began construction on a new two-story building that would have room for community gatherings upstairs. Application was made for a post office, which required that they choose a name. The McGuire family suggested


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; near Thorhild (Thorhild, Alberta) rural_municipalities Lac Ste. Anne County (Lac Ste. Anne County, Alberta), Barrhead No. 11 County (Barrhead County No. 11, Alberta), Westlock County (Westlock County, Alberta), Thorhild No. 7 County (Thorhild County No. 7, Alberta) towns Barrhead (Barrhead, Alberta), Westlock


significant role

the original Express Trail, which was the shortest route to the Yukon during the Gold Rush years. Once established, this route was key to the settlement of the Peace River region. The old Barrhead town site, 3 km north of the present Town Centre, was a frequent stop over for the few Klondikers and others who needed supplies for the rigorous journey north. Originally established in 1906, Barrhead's position as a major trade centre on the historic Express Trail gave it a significant role in the settlement of north-western Alberta. It was a vital link in the trade route from Fort Edmonton to the Yukon. James McGuire, the child of one of the first settlers in the area, named Barrhead after his hometown in Scotland. Today, the community's rich history can be revisited through a collection of artifacts at the Barrhead and District Museum. The museum also houses a large display of African taxidermy, as well as the Barrhead Visitor Information Centre, which is open from May to September. The Great Blue Heron is another prominent figure in local lore, is often spotted along the shores of the Paddle River and local lakes, and is the town's official animal. A statue of the bird is situated next to the Community Gazebo that marks the town centre and miniatures of the bird adorn the street posts. The area was a quiet land of rolling hills well covered with stands of poplar, birch, pine and spruce trees on the higher ground with the low areas filled with willow and tamarack. The area has always been sparsely populated, with Cree natives passing through the region for the last 5000 years mainly settling around the different lakes in the region (such as Shoal Lake). In 1810 a First Nations trail was explored by David Thompson to connect the North Saskatchewan with Athabasca Pass, creating the first Canadian Transcontinental connection. In 1811 the first letter ever delivered from British Columbia to Montreal passed through this trail and its importance as a communication and trade route began to grow. In 1824, at the request of Gov. George Simpson the trail was widened from Fort Assiniboine to Fort Edmonton passing one mile (1.6 km) east of the present town, to accommodate the increased traffic along to route (as much as 75 horses or more a day). Some of the larger pack trains had over a hundred head of horses. The Cree natives and trappers moved across the area as they went about their business. As the First Nations peoples trapped a greater number of beavers and broke a number of dams the express trail (the Klondike trial) became flooded and partially abandoned until 1898. During the gold rush some Klondikers attempted to use the trail, although most preferred the drier route that was established heading up to Athabasca Landing (Athabasca, Alberta). The pack-trail was widened to allow teams of horses and wagons, loaded high with provisions, to carry gold seekers north. Homesteaders soon followed. Surveys of the land took place in 1906 and 1907 and the pioneers applied for quarters (160 acres) of land. Trading posts were busy on both the Pembina and Athabasca rivers. A small store in the log home of Percy and Mary Johnstone (2 miles north and east of the Hamlet of Kinuso (Kinuso, Alberta) and proceeds south through Swan Hills (Swan Hills, Alberta) and Barrhead (Barrhead, Alberta) to Highway 43 (Alberta Highway 43) near Gunn (Gunn, Alberta). location Barrhead County No. 11 (Barrhead County No. 11, Alberta), Alberta, Canada nearest_city Barrhead (Barrhead, Alberta), Edmonton (Edmonton, Alberta) lat_d 54

Barrhead, Alberta

'''Barrhead''' is a town in central Alberta, Canada, within the County of Barrhead No. 11. It is located along the Paddle River and at the intersection of Highway 33 (Alberta Highway 33) (Grizzly Trail) and Highway 18 (Alberta Highway 18), approximately

The town was named after the Scottish town Barrhead, the birthplace of one of the children of the area's early settlers, James McGuire.

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