Baracoa

What is Baracoa known for?


great views

WikiPedia:Baracoa commons:Baracoa


drinking

to want to have a car, not a bici-taxi), but be aware that the road is rough and the trip will likely take longer than the distance suggests. Do Relax around the town, share a bottle of rum and koola cola with locals at the nightclub 100 steps above the town. The Casa de la Trova by the church offers itself as a comfortable and welcoming drinking establishment where you can dance with the locals. Popular for any blossoming salsa lovers. Beaches *

serve local cuisine. Drink Be sure to check out Baracoan drinking chocolate – hot chocolate brewed with cinnamon leaves. It's delicious, though the powdered milk limits its potential somewhat. You'll of course find the usual assortment of peso and CUC sodas and alcohol in bars all around Baracoa. Sleep As elsewhere in Cuba, ''casas particulares'', available for around 15-20 CUC per nightm will most likely be your cheapest options. Casa particulars are available, expect

century, this ''casa'' features Baracoan drinking chocolate and local specialties for dinner. * Hotels *


frequently

not unpleasant. Baracoa can be surprisingly cool, though most of the surrounding area is pretty hot. Get in Although no longer reachable only by boat, Baracoa remains pretty isolated. Baracoa is accessible from Guantanamo City via ''La Farola'' (the lighthouse), a mountain road built in the 1960's to reward the Baracoans for their support of the revolution. Note that transportation '''out''' of Baracoa on both the plane and bus is frequently '''fully-booked''', so make sure to buy your return

flies to Havana on Thursdays and Sundays. The flight is frequently delayed so check the time at the airport office (Calle Jose Marti) or with local travel offices before showing up at the airport. By car It's also possible to drive La Farola in a rental vehicle or a taxi, though this is not particularly recommended as, asides from the difficulty and expense of getting a rental car in Cuba, most of the road, especially the mountainous sections, is '''very remote''' and if a breakdown happens


major agricultural

WikiPedia:Baracoa commons:Baracoa


elegant

checkin checkout content An alright room, with a great elderly couple, which actually adopted us while we're been there. Because of them, Baracoa was even more wonderful! It's about 8 minutes walk from the center. *

Hill west of Calixto Garcia, near Mariana Grajales lat long directions phone tollfree fax price checkin checkout content Converted from Castillo El Seboruco, this elegant hotel allows you to feel like a ''conquistador'' – and has an amazing view over the town (though you don't have to stay here to see it). Cope Being a tiny isolated tourist town in a largely isolated country, Baracoa doesn't have lots of communication with the outside world, though


legal family

to pay between 15-20 CUC per night. Note that while many ''casas'' are small, they tend to operate in informal (and not entirely legal) family networks, so if the main ''casa'' is full, you will stay at a family member's. Don't expect that most ''casa'' owners speak English. Be prepared for the onslaught of hoteliers and taxi drivers as you arrive at the bus stop.. Watch out for the people claiming to be hotel owners, offering you a very cheap rate because this may change when you arrive


Dodge

, but potholes with bits of road''', and you'll feel the bus swerving in all directions to dodge them. Most tours also take in Playa Duaba, above. File:Monte Iberia Dwarf Frog (Eleutherodactylus Iberia) (8572426754).jpg alt A tiny brown frog with yellow stripes A Monte Iberia Dwarf Frog, the smallest frog in the Northern Hemisphere, in Alejandro de Humboldt park. Cuban Painted Snail (Polymita picta) (8573971561).jpg alt A snail shell with yellow stripes radiating outwards One

Baracoa. The first is to take the unpaved road towards Parque Nacional Alejandro de Humboldt past the park towards '''Moa''' in Holguín province (Holguin (province) ). Even going just to the park, the road is a potholed mess (you'll find your bus swinging back and forth to dodge them all, maybe occasionally leaving the road), and after the park it's even worse. If you make it to Moa, it's a depressing industrial town that likely has no tourist accommodations, but venturing further will take


amazing view

Hill west of Calixto Garcia, near Mariana Grajales lat long directions phone tollfree fax price checkin checkout content Converted from Castillo El Seboruco, this elegant hotel allows you to feel like a ''conquistador'' – and has an amazing view over the town (though you don't have to stay here to see it). Cope Being a tiny isolated tourist town in a largely isolated country, Baracoa doesn't have lots of communication with the outside world, though it does have an '''Etecsa''' office just off Parque Independencia. The local newspaper is ''Venceremos'' ("We will conquer"), as in the rest of Guantanamo province. * WikiPedia:Baracoa commons:Baracoa


title news

ecological damage. A complex network of massive dams and complex semi-secret underground fortifications


culture distinct

as the first of Diego Velazquez' villas in 1511, and was Cuba's capital until 1515, when the capital was moved to Santiago in part due to Baracoa's remoteness. In the coming centuries, Baracoa, simultaneously close and remote from the rest of Cuba, thrived off piracy and developed a culture distinct from the rest of the island. French settlers fleeing the revolution in nearby Haiti found the climate ideal for growing chocolate, and the city transitioned to an agricultural center. In the lead-up to the 1959 revolution, the citizens of Baracoa were particularly supportive and helpful (as was generally true of Eastern Cuba), and were rewarded by the completion of a road from Guantánamo and the end of more than 4 centuries of isolation. Today Baracoa is chiefly a major agricultural zone for Cuba, with all of Cuba's chocolate coming from the surrounding area, as well as a major destination on the Cuban tourist trail. Culture Baracoa's culture has more visible indigenous roots than most of the rest of the Cuba, and many major archeological finds have been made here. The local hero is Hatuey, who famously resisted the Spanish, and local art has a distinctive indigenous inflection to it. The cuisine is also different from the rest of Cuba and the overall lifestyle is more relaxed. Climate Baracoa and the surrounding areas has a tropical rainforest microclimate, which allows chocolate to grow very well. Expect a fair bit of rain, although it's generally not unpleasant. Baracoa can be surprisingly cool, though most of the surrounding area is pretty hot. Get in Although no longer reachable only by boat, Baracoa remains pretty isolated. Baracoa is accessible from Guantanamo City via ''La Farola'' (the lighthouse), a mountain road built in the 1960's to reward the Baracoans for their support of the revolution. Note that transportation '''out''' of Baracoa on both the plane and bus is frequently '''fully-booked''', so make sure to buy your return tickets on arrival or, better yet, when reserving your outbound trip. By bus A daily Viazul bus runs to Santiago (Santiago de Cuba ) via Guantanamo City, taking about 5 hours. The bus also has a few semi-official flag stops along the coast road and La Farola, where it picks up hitchhikers. The bus ride is one of the more beautiful in Cuba, going from arid-semi dessert out of Guantanamo to impressive mountains on La Farola to rainforest lowlands approaching Baracoa. Near the midpoint of La Farola, the bus makes a stop at a tiny tourist-oriented village, where you can buy red bananas, Baracoa chocolate, and ''cucurucho''. Astro, the national bus line, also runs to Baracoa, but as a tourist you are highly unlikely to be allowed on Astro, and if you are (usually by being a student) you're not likely to get a seat. Of course, this being Cuba, the usual array of chartered buses also serve Baracoa. By plane Cubana's subsidiary Aero Caribe flies to Havana on Thursdays and Sundays. The flight is frequently delayed so check the time at the airport office (Calle Jose Marti) or with local travel offices before showing up at the airport. By car It's also possible to drive La Farola in a rental vehicle or a taxi, though this is not particularly recommended as, asides from the difficulty and expense of getting a rental car in Cuba, most of the road, especially the mountainous sections, is '''very remote''' and if a breakdown happens, you will be stuck for a while; there is no cell phone reception and the only way to communicate will be through buses. Baracoa is 150 km east of Guantanamo City. Get around Baracoa is a tiny and very compact town, as such walking will be the primary form of transportation in-town. For excursions further afield, a taxi or a bici-taxi is handy. Bici-taxis are everywhere and can be paid for in CUC or Moneda Nacional. Regular taxis are less common but can be hired if necessary. By hired driver Bici-taxis are available for rent, expect to pay approximately $5CUC day Alternatively, you can hire a car (with driver) for approx. $20CUC. By moped Mopeds Scooters can be rented from a rental agency just off the main park (Parque Centro). It is located inside a cafeteria next to the Cinema. Expect to pay approximately $25CUC for a full day. See In Town thumbnail right alt View along the Malecon (sea wall) of Baracoa Baracoa's Malecon is much more low-key than the famous one in Havana (File:BaracoaMalecon.JPG) * WikiPedia:Baracoa commons:Baracoa

Baracoa

'''Baracoa''' is a municipality and city in Guantánamo Province near the eastern tip of Cuba. It was founded by the first governor of Cuba, the Spanish (Spanish Empire) conquistador Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar in August 15 of 1511. It is the oldest Spanish settlement in Cuba and was its first capital (the basis for its nickname '''''Ciudad Primada''''', "First City").

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