Bamako

What is Bamako known for?


place de

Monument File:NCC tower Bamako.jpg Tower by the Bamako International Conference Center File:Bamako_Entrance_Arch.jpg Bamako airport road welcome sign File:Place de la liberté - Bamako.jpg Place de la liberté Sister cities * *

http: www.museebamako.org email address Place de la Liberté lat 12.646868 long -8.001665 directions phone +223 2000 0000 tollfree fax hours price Entrance fee is XOF500 for residents of Mali, XOF1500 for tourists. content Details the urban history of Bamako. Featuring local art, travel posters and exhibitions of artists living and working in Bamako. *

lat 12.638758 long -8.002886 directions Next to Place de l'OVMS phone tollfree fax hours price c. XOF3000 for main dishes content Restaurant serving good authentic African cuisine, on a square just off a main road. Not luxurious but good. Beer and wine are available but, because of the proximity to a mosque, don't be surprised if on Fridays they ask you to keep the bottles out of sight on the floor. They have a second location at the Musée National. *


small gold

is in the public domain.'' Recent criticism has surfaced around the working conditions, pay, and the widespread use of child labour in these small gold mines, and the method which middlemen, in regional centers like Sikasso and Kayes, purchase and transport gold. Gold collected in the towns is sold on—with almost no regulation or oversight—to larger merchant houses in Bamako or Conakry, and eventually to smelters in Europe. Kids working in African gold mines. AP RUKMINI CALLIMACHI AND BRADLEY S. KLAPPER – Aug 10, 2008. Ecological factors, especially pollution of water by mine tailings, is a major source of concern. In addition, the continued exploitation of unregulated small scale mining, often by child labourers, supplies a large international gold market in Bamako which feeds into international production. Report on Human Rights Practices 2006: Mali. United States Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (March 6, 2007). ''This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.'' Recent criticism has surfaced around the working conditions, pay, and the widespread use of child labour in these small gold mines, and the method which middlemen, in regional centers like Sikasso and Kayes, purchase and transport gold. Gold collected in the towns is sold on—with almost no regulation or oversight—to larger merchant houses in Bamako or Conakry, and eventually to smelters in Europe. Kids working in African gold mines. AP RUKMINI CALLIMACHI AND BRADLEY S. KLAPPER – Aug 10, 2008. Ecological factors, especially pollution of water by mine tailings, is a major source of concern. Barriers to transport While police control barriers are a common sight on African highways, and while illicit demands for bribes at such stops are common in many countries, the main Malian highway heading south from Bamako to the Burkina Faso border was singled out in late 2008 as the worst in West Africa. A survey by the Observatory of Abnormal Practices (OPA) of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) found the Malian section of this road to have the highest number of police roadblocks with the highest average amount paid in bribes per trip in West Africa. An average of twenty-nine roadblocks, almost 4 for every 100 km, were reported from June to September 2008. The amount paid in bribes in the Mali section (per trip) was CFA F 31,509. While in other nations the customs officials were responsible for most stops, in Mali, gendarmerie (National paramilitary police) and the Police force were found creating the majority of bribe extorting roadblocks. The number of roadblocks on the Bamako-Burkina highway also increased by 12 per cent during the third quarter of 2008, going from 67 to 75. High number of barriers on Ouagadougou-Bamako road. Pana Press. 05 01 2009. * '''Joint Military School''' at Koulikoro (:fr:École militaire interarmes de Koulikoro) * '''Alioune Blondin Beye Peacekeeping Training School at Bamako (:fr:École de maintien de la paix Alioune Blondin Beye de Bamako) Since Mauritania negotiated a boundary dispute with Mali in 1963, ties between the two countries have been mostly cordial. Handloff, Robert E. "Relations with Other African States". In ''Mauritania: A Country Study'' (Robert E. Handloff, editor). Library of Congress Federal Research Division (June 1988). ''This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.'' Mali and Mauritania have cooperated on several development projects, such as the OMVS and a plan to improve roads between Nouakchott and Bamako. This cooperation somewhat lessened Mali's dependence on Senegal and Côte d'Ivoire. Although relations were warm with other black African states, since 1965 the orientation of Mauritania's foreign policy has been geared towards relations with North African countries. Russia has an embassy in Bamako, and Mali has an embassy in Moscow (Embassy of Mali in Moscow). The water in the Niger River basin is partially regulated through dams. In Mali the Sélingué Dam on the Sankarani River is mainly used for hydropower, but also permits irrigation. Two diversion dams, one at Sotuba just downstream of Bamako, and one at Markala, just downstream of Ségou, are used to irrigate about 54,000 hectares. In Nigeria the Kainji Dam and the Jebba dam are used to generate hydropower. Six people were killed during the 1988 race, three participants and three local residents. In one incident, Baye Sibi, a 10-year-old Malian girl, was killed by a racer while she crossed a road. A film crew's vehicle killed a mother and daughter in Mauritania on the last day of the race. The race participants killed, in three separate crashes, were a Dutch navigator on the DAF Trucks team, a French privateer (privateer (motorsport)), and a French rider (motorcycle). Racers were also blamed for starting a wildfire that caused a panic on a train running between Dakar and Bamako, where three more people were killed. Commons:Category:Bamako Wikipedia:Bamako Dmoz:Regional Africa Mali Localities Bamako


including books

1960 independence, this library became the Government Library; it would later be renamed again as the National Library of Mali. In 1968, the library was transferred from its initial home in Koulouba to Ouolofobougou, a section of Bamako. The library holds more than 60,000 works, including books, periodicals, audio documents, videos, and software. These materials are available free to the public, though a small subscription fee is required for borrowing privileges. The library also hosts


painting dance

Festival for women voices, MASSAO 2005) in Douala from 29 April to 7 May. Werewere Liking, Cameronian multidisciplinary artist (music, theatre, literature, painting, dance) was rewarded with the ''Massao d'honneur'' ("Honorary Massao"). * Mali: A conference on "multilingualism for cultural diversity and for the participation of all in cyberspace" took place in Bamako (Mali) on 6 and 7 May in the presence of Koïchiro Matsuura, director general


quick food

menu, a wide range of cocktails, and cold draft beer - it is one of the most popular restaurants to see and be seen. An entrée here is around $15 US. Also this place frequently has art exhibitions for local artists. * '''Le Terrace''' next door to the Bla Bla is a very large bar lounge on top of a night club. Very good atmosphere and salsa music, dancing. Good pizzas and other fare. * '''Le Relax''' is a popular Lebanese hangout in Hippodrome with quick food and free Wi-Fi access. Pizzas


international book

, he was a teacher for several years before turning to writing. He is the founder of ''Editions Le Figuier'' (''Prickly Pear (opuntia) Publishing'') and the director of the ''Association Etonnants voyageurs Afrique'' (''Amazing Travellers Africa Association'') and, along with Michel Le Bris, is the Mali manager of the ''Festival Etonnants voyageurs'', an international book fair. *Mali **Bamako (Senou International Airport) *Senegal Dramé was born in Nioro du Sahel


film de

. * Senegal: The Goethe Institute (Goethe-Institut) of Senegal organized on 9 and 10 April a colloquium on the oeuvre of the Senegalese writer Aminata Sow Fall, entitled ''Une femme de lettres africaine de dimension internationale'' ("An African female writer of international importance"). * Tunisia: The fourth edition of the ''Festival international du film de l'environnement'' ("International Festival of Environmental Film") in Kairouan (Tunisia) ended


period frequent

³ to provide drinking water per day is insufficient for the needs estimated at 152,000 m³ during the hot season between April and June. During this period, frequent water shortages are experienced. A new pumping station was to open in Kabala in 2009. Landmarks thumb right 250px Bamako Grand Mosque (File:Mosque Bamako.jpg) The National Library of Mali was first created by the Institut Français d'Afrique Noire, an arm of the French colonial government, in 1944. Following Mali's


gold set

: www.afdevinfo.com htmlreports lor lor_21205.html afdevinfo: Kouroussa Exploration Area of government granted Gold mining concessions The Kouroussa Project: Cassidy Gold corporation. near the town. Cassidy Gold Set to Resume Drilling at Kouroussa Business Wire, Jan 18, 2005 The Kouroussa

exploration drilling in a series afdevinfo: Kouroussa Exploration Area of government granted Gold mining concessions The Kouroussa Project: Cassidy Gold corporation. near the town. Cassidy Gold Set to Resume Drilling at Kouroussa Business


international gold

million acres) under cultivation. In addition, the continued exploitation of unregulated small scale mining, often by child labourers, supplies a large international gold market in Bamako which feeds into international production. Report on Human Rights Practices 2006: Mali. United States Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (March 6, 2007). ''This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.'' Recent criticism has surfaced around the working conditions, pay, and the widespread use of child labour in these small gold mines, and the method which middlemen, in regional centers like Sikasso and Kayes, purchase and transport gold. Gold collected in the towns is sold on—with almost no regulation or oversight—to larger merchant houses in Bamako or Conakry, and eventually to smelters in Europe. Kids working in African gold mines. AP RUKMINI CALLIMACHI AND BRADLEY S. KLAPPER – Aug 10, 2008. Ecological factors, especially pollution of water by mine tailings, is a major source of concern. In addition, the continued exploitation of unregulated small scale mining, often by child labourers, supplies a large international gold market in Bamako which feeds into international production. Report on Human Rights Practices 2006: Mali. United States Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor (March 6, 2007). ''This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.'' Recent criticism has surfaced around the working conditions, pay, and the widespread use of child labour in these small gold mines, and the method which middlemen, in regional centers like Sikasso and Kayes, purchase and transport gold. Gold collected in the towns is sold on—with almost no regulation or oversight—to larger merchant houses in Bamako or Conakry, and eventually to smelters in Europe. Kids working in African gold mines. AP RUKMINI CALLIMACHI AND BRADLEY S. KLAPPER – Aug 10, 2008. Ecological factors, especially pollution of water by mine tailings, is a major source of concern. Barriers to transport While police control barriers are a common sight on African highways, and while illicit demands for bribes at such stops are common in many countries, the main Malian highway heading south from Bamako to the Burkina Faso border was singled out in late 2008 as the worst in West Africa. A survey by the Observatory of Abnormal Practices (OPA) of the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU) found the Malian section of this road to have the highest number of police roadblocks with the highest average amount paid in bribes per trip in West Africa. An average of twenty-nine roadblocks, almost 4 for every 100 km, were reported from June to September 2008. The amount paid in bribes in the Mali section (per trip) was CFA F 31,509. While in other nations the customs officials were responsible for most stops, in Mali, gendarmerie (National paramilitary police) and the Police force were found creating the majority of bribe extorting roadblocks. The number of roadblocks on the Bamako-Burkina highway also increased by 12 per cent during the third quarter of 2008, going from 67 to 75. High number of barriers on Ouagadougou-Bamako road. Pana Press. 05 01 2009. * '''Joint Military School''' at Koulikoro (:fr:École militaire interarmes de Koulikoro) * '''Alioune Blondin Beye Peacekeeping Training School at Bamako (:fr:École de maintien de la paix Alioune Blondin Beye de Bamako) Since Mauritania negotiated a boundary dispute with Mali in 1963, ties between the two countries have been mostly cordial. Handloff, Robert E. "Relations with Other African States". In ''Mauritania: A Country Study'' (Robert E. Handloff, editor). Library of Congress Federal Research Division (June 1988). ''This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.'' Mali and Mauritania have cooperated on several development projects, such as the OMVS and a plan to improve roads between Nouakchott and Bamako. This cooperation somewhat lessened Mali's dependence on Senegal and Côte d'Ivoire. Although relations were warm with other black African states, since 1965 the orientation of Mauritania's foreign policy has been geared towards relations with North African countries. Russia has an embassy in Bamako, and Mali has an embassy in Moscow (Embassy of Mali in Moscow). The water in the Niger River basin is partially regulated through dams. In Mali the Sélingué Dam on the Sankarani River is mainly used for hydropower, but also permits irrigation. Two diversion dams, one at Sotuba just downstream of Bamako, and one at Markala, just downstream of Ségou, are used to irrigate about 54,000 hectares. In Nigeria the Kainji Dam and the Jebba dam are used to generate hydropower. Six people were killed during the 1988 race, three participants and three local residents. In one incident, Baye Sibi, a 10-year-old Malian girl, was killed by a racer while she crossed a road. A film crew's vehicle killed a mother and daughter in Mauritania on the last day of the race. The race participants killed, in three separate crashes, were a Dutch navigator on the DAF Trucks team, a French privateer (privateer (motorsport)), and a French rider (motorcycle). Racers were also blamed for starting a wildfire that caused a panic on a train running between Dakar and Bamako, where three more people were killed. Commons:Category:Bamako Wikipedia:Bamako Dmoz:Regional Africa Mali Localities Bamako

Bamako

'''Bamako''' is the capital and largest city of Mali, with a population of 1.8 million (2009 census, provisional). In 2006, it was estimated to be the fastest growing city in Africa and sixth-fastest in the world. World's fastest growing cities and urban areas from 2006 to 2020, by CityMayors.com It is located on the Niger River, near the rapids that divide the upper and middle Niger valleys in the southwestern part of the country.

Bamako is the nation's administrative center. The city proper is a cercle (Cercles of Mali) in its own right. Bamako's river port is located in nearby Koulikoro, along with a major regional trade and conference center. Bamako is the seventh-largest West African urban center after Lagos, Abidjan, Kano, Ibadan, Dakar, and Accra. Locally manufactured goods include textiles, processed meat, and metal goods. Commercial fishing occurs on the Niger River.

The name Bamako comes from the Bambara (Bambara language) word meaning "crocodile river". "SUDANESE IMPOSE SENEGAL BOYCOTT; Traders Told to Use Port in Ivory Coast – Move Is Aimed at Dakar's Trade". ''New York Times'', 3 September 1960

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