Bagan

What is Bagan known for?


title studies

number II * *


historical founder

workshops mainly for tourists who come to see the ancient temples of Bagan. At the village of Kyaukka near Monywa in the Chindwin (Chindwin River) valley, however, sturdy lacquer utensils are still produced for everyday use mainly in plain black. King Anawrahta (1044–1077); the historical founder of the Burmese (Burma) empire, unified the country and adopted the Theravādin Buddhist faith. This initiated the creation of thousands of Buddhist temples at Pagan (Bagan), the capital, between the 11th and 13th century. Around 2,000 of them are still standing. The power of the Burmese waned with the rise of the Thai (Thai (ethnic group)), and with the seizure of the capital Pagan by the Mongols in 1287, but Theravāda Buddhism remained the main Burmese faith to this day. Burma is a predominantly Theravada Buddhist country. Buddhism reached Burma around the beginning of the Christian era, mingling with Hinduism (also imported from India) and indigenous animism. The Pyu and Mon (Mon people) kingdoms of the first millennium were Buddhist, but the early Bamar peoples were animists. According to traditional history, King Anawrahta of Bagan adopted Buddhism in 1056 and went to war with the Mon (Mon people) kingdom of Thaton in the south of the country in order to obtain the Buddhist Canon (Tripitaka) and learned monks. The religious tradition created at this time, and which continues to the present day, is a syncretalist mix of what might be termed 'pure' Buddhism (of the Theravada school) with deep-rooted elements of the original animism or nat worship (Nat (spirit)) Commons:Category:Bagan Wikipedia:Bagan


architecture year

a favourite theme in the Bagan period. The original Indic design was gradually modified first by the Pyu (Pyu people), and then by Burmans at Bagan where the ''stupa'' gradually developed a longer, cylindrical form. The earliest Bagan ''stupas'' such as the Bupaya (c


impressive quot

flying over a pagoda in Bagan Bagan survived into the 15th century as a human settlement, Aung-Thwin 1985: 196–197 and as a pilgrimage destination throughout the imperial period. A smaller number of "new and impressive" religious monuments still went up to the mid-15th century but afterward, new temple constructions slowed to a trickle with fewer than 200 temples built between the 15th and 20th centuries. The old


year starting

''The Atlantic (The Atlantic Monthly)'' accessdate 2008-09-11 Taungbyone, north of Mandalay, is another major site with the festival held each year starting on the eleventh waxing day and including the full moon in the month of ''Wagaung (Traditional Burmese calendar)'' (August). Commons:Category:Bagan Wikipedia:Bagan


temple

flying over a pagoda in Bagan Bagan survived into the 15th century as a human settlement, Aung-Thwin 1985: 196–197 and as a pilgrimage destination throughout the imperial period. A smaller number of "new and impressive" religious monuments still went up to the mid-15th century but afterward, new temple constructions slowed to a trickle with fewer than 200 temples built between the 15th and 20th centuries. The old

capital remained a pilgrimage destination but pilgrimage was focused only on "a score or so" most prominent temples out of the thousands such as the Ananda (Ananda Temple), the Shwezigon (Shwezigon Pagoda), the Sulamani (Sulamani Temple), the Htilominlo (Htilominlo Temple), the Dhammayazika (Dhammayazika Pagoda), and a few other temples along an ancient road. The rest—thousands of less famous, out-of-the-way temples—fell into disrepair, and most did not survive the test of time

—some finished with "a rude plastered surface, scratched without taste, art or result". The interiors of some temples were also whitewashed, such as the Thatbyinnyu (Thatbyinnyu Temple) and the Ananda. Many painted inscriptions and even murals were added in this period. Stadtner 2011: 217 20th century to present File:Pumpkin Pagoda -Bupaya Pagoda-, Pagan, Upper Burma.jpg thumb The original Bupaya seen here in 1868 was completely destroyed


culture year

Palaces in Myanmar url http: culturemyanmar.org pages doa_royal_palace.html publisher Ministry of Culture year 2009 accessdate 2012-02-19 * *


small+show

of the walls of) the northern side of Old Bagan. On the day itself, the boys are brought to the monastery by parents and relatives dressed in gowns, crowns, flowers, sequins, and glitter, stockings, and make-up. An audience gathers. The place itself is colourfully festooned. A small show consists of songs by hired singers accompanied by ensemble music, a pep talk by a layman and some rituals. After some photos with their parents, the boys are brought again to another monastery to be stripped, heads shaved, and bathed. Finally they are assembled in the hall in front of the abbot for prayer recitation, oath taking, and robe-blessing ceremonies, after which they are totally stripped and dressed in their new vestments by their parents. They will stay the rest of their school holiday in the monastery. * Commons:Category:Bagan Wikipedia:Bagan


temple designs

;four-face" design—essentially one main entrance and four main entrances. Other styles such as five-face and hybrids also exist. The one-face style grew out of 2nd century Beikthano, and the four-face out of 7th century Sri Ksetra. The temples, whose main features were the pointed arches and the vaulted chamber, became larger and grander in the Bagan period. Aung-Thwin 2005: 224–225 Innovations Although the Burmese temple designs evolved


temple design

, and their contribution to Burmese temple design. The artistry of the architecture of pagodas in Bagan prove the acheivement of Myanmar craftsmen in handicrafts. The Bagan temple falls into one of two broad categories: the ''stupa''-style solid temple and the ''gu''-style ( ) hollow temple. Stupas

Bagan

'''Bagan''' ( ; formerly '''Pagan''') is an ancient city located in the Mandalay Region of Burma (Myanmar). From the 9th to 13th centuries, the city was the capital of the Kingdom of Pagan (Pagan Kingdom), the first kingdom to unify the regions that would later constitute modern Myanmar. During the kingdom's height between the 11th and 13th centuries, over 10,000 Buddhist temples, pagodas and monasteries were constructed in the Bagan plains alone, of which the remains of over 2200 temples and pagodas still survive to the present day.

There is a well-known saying of Myanmar people : "If you are a real Myanmar, you must have been to Bagan." Bagan is spirit of history of Myanmar.

The '''Bagan Archaeological Zone''' is a main draw for the country's nascent tourism industry (Tourism in Burma). It is seen by many as equal in attraction to Angkor Wat in Cambodia. http: www.economist.com news special-report 21578171-why-investors-still-need-proceed-caution-promiseand-pitfalls Business: The promise—and the pitfalls

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