Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

What is Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory known for?


year making

climatological high-pressure areas acquire regionally based names. The land-based Siberian High often remains quasi-stationary for more than a month during the most frigid time of the year, making it unique in that regard. It is also a bit larger and more persistent than its counterpart in North America. W. T. Sturges (1991).


unique community

are augmented by the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), a joint enterprise with the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. CIMAS enables AOML and university scientists to collaborate on research areas of mutual interest and facilitates the participation of students and visiting scientists. The Laboratory is a member of a unique community of marine research and educational institutions located on Virginia Key in Miami


international research

ecosystems, and hurricanes and tropical meteorology) employ a cross-disciplinary approach, conducted through collaborative interactions with national and international research and environmental forecasting institutions. More information about AOML's research can be found at http: www.aoml.noaa.gov research. Oceans and climate AOML conducts ocean and climate studies to better understand the large-scale setting for regional climate signals


term describing

November 11, 2007 accessdate September 9, 2011 (The wind flow around an anticyclone, on the other hand, is clockwise in the northern hemisphere, and counterclockwise in the southern hemisphere.) Tropical cyclogenesis is the technical term describing the development and strengthening of a tropical cyclone in the atmosphere.


including studies

. The research particularly emphasizes interannual and longer time scales of variability (http: www.aoml.noaa.gov phod). AOML manages global ocean observing systems and, with these and other data, conducts research in several areas including studies of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomena, North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), tropical Atlantic variability (Tropical Atlantic Variability), the Meridional Overturning Cell, wind-driven gyres in the Atlantic (Atlantic Ocean), the global carbon cycle, and other climatically-relevant atmospheric compounds. Embedded within these studies are activities directed at the circulation of the tropical Atlantic, western boundary currents including the Gulf Stream and Deep Western Boundary Current, and the oceanography of the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and coastal Florida. Oceans and climate related research projects: * Meridional overturning circulation * Tropical Atlantic variability * Oceans and weather * Physical oceanography * Oceans and ecosystems * Global carbon cycle Coastal ecosystems Coastal and regional ecosystem research has been a focus of AOML activities for more than two decades. Current interdisciplinary field efforts include physical, biological, and chemical studies supporting the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration (SFER) effort and the underlying health of this ecosystem to the regional Intra-Americas Sea program, as well as the status and health of coral reef ecosystems worldwide. Coastal Ecosystem related research projects: * Global carbon cycle * Climate change * Coastal pollution * Fishing effects * Physical oceanography of coral reefs * Coral health and monitoring program * Petroleum and oil spill research * Marine and Estuarine Goal Setting for South Florida (MARES) Project Hurricanes and tropical meteorology Tropical meteorology research at AOML is focused on advancing the understanding and prediction of hurricanes and other tropical weather. Scientists conduct their research utilizing a combination of models, theories, and observations, with particular emphasis on data obtained with research aircraft in the inner core of tropical cyclones and their surrounding environment. Hurricanes and tropical meteorology related research projects: * Track forecasting (Tropical cyclone track forecasting) * Hurricane intensity change * Climate variation * Hurricane impacts * Administrative projects References


related research

, the global carbon cycle, and other climatically-relevant atmospheric compounds. Embedded within these studies are activities directed at the circulation of the tropical Atlantic, western boundary currents including the Gulf Stream and Deep Western Boundary Current, and the oceanography of the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and coastal Florida. Oceans and climate related research projects: * Meridional overturning circulation * Tropical Atlantic variability * Oceans and weather

ecosystems worldwide. Coastal Ecosystem related research projects: * Global carbon cycle * Climate change * Coastal pollution * Fishing effects * Physical oceanography of coral reefs * Coral health and monitoring program * Petroleum and oil spill research * Marine and Estuarine Goal Setting for South Florida (MARES) Project Hurricanes and tropical meteorology Tropical meteorology research at AOML is focused on advancing the understanding and prediction of hurricanes and other tropical

weather. Scientists conduct their research utilizing a combination of models, theories, and observations, with particular emphasis on data obtained with research aircraft in the inner core of tropical cyclones and their surrounding environment. Hurricanes and tropical meteorology related research projects: * Track forecasting (Tropical cyclone track forecasting) * Hurricane intensity change * Climate variation * Hurricane impacts * Administrative projects References


extremely powerful

to their classification as "warm core" storm systems.


frequently

External links * Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) Category:Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Category:Oceanographic institutions In the Northern Atlantic Ocean, a distinct tropical cyclone season occurs from 1 June to 30 November.

: www.aoml.noaa.gov hrd tcfaq L6.html title Frequently Asked Questions: Are TC tornadoes weaker than midlatitude tornadoes? publisher National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration date 2006-10-04 accessdate 2009-12-13 Tropical cyclogenesis describes the process of development of tropical cyclones. Tropical cyclones form due to latent heat driven by significant thunderstorm activity, and are warm core.

Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory , Hurricane Research Division title Frequently Asked Questions: What is an extra-tropical cyclone? author Stan Goldenberg date 2004-08-13 accessdate 2007-03-23 url http: www.aoml.noaa.gov hrd tcfaq A7.html Cyclones can transition between extratropical, subtropical, and tropical phases under the right conditions. Mesocyclones form as warm core cyclones over land, and can lead to tornado formation. ref name "FoN" >


energy work

: www.aoml.noaa.gov hrd ike title Integrated Kinetic Energy work Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory publisher National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration date 2009-02-07 accessdate 2009-01-18 In the tropical latitudes (tropics), tropical storms and hurricanes generally move westward with a slight tend toward the north, under the influence of the ''subtropical ridge'', a high pressure system that usually extends east-west across the subtropics. ref


quot significant

that favorable conditions occur. Spring and fall experience peaks of activity as those are the seasons when stronger winds, wind shear, and atmospheric instability are present.

Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory

The '''Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory''' ('''AOML'''), a federal research laboratory, is part of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR), located in Miami, Florida. AOML's research spans tropical cyclone and hurricanes, coastal ecosystems, oceans and human health, climate studies (Climatology), global carbon systems, and ocean observations. It is one of seven NOAA Research Laboratories (RLs).

AOML’s organizational structure consists of an Office of the Director and three scientific research divisions. The Office of the Director oversees the Laboratory’s scientific programs, as well as its financial, administrative, computer, outreach education, and facility management services. Research programs are augmented by the Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies (CIMAS), a joint enterprise with the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. CIMAS enables AOML and university scientists to collaborate on research areas of mutual interest and facilitates the participation of students and visiting scientists.

The Laboratory is a member of a unique community of marine research and educational institutions located on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida. Approximately $150M per year is invested in marine science and education among the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center, the Miami Seaquarium, the Maritime and Science Technology Academy (MAST Academy).

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