Arabia Petraea

What is Arabia Petraea known for?


daraa

First as part of the Diocese of the East, Arabia turned a frontline of Byzantine-Sassanid Wars. In the 5th or 6th century it was transformed into Palaestina Salutaris. Episcopal sees Ancient episcopal sees of the Roman province of Arabia listed in the ''Annuario Pontificio'' as titular sees: ''Annuario Pontificio 2013'' (Libreria Editrice Vaticana 2013 ISBN 978-88-209-9070-1), "Sedi titolari", pp. 819-1013


term quot

Syria, improperly called the diocese of Arabia because its capital Bostra was within the northern extremity of the Roman province of Arabia Petrae. The origin of the Nabateans remains obscure, but they were Aramaic (Aramaic language) speakers, and the term "Nabatean" was the Arabic name for an Aramean of Syria and Iraq. By the 3rd century during the Late Roman Period, the Nabateans stopped writing in Aramaic and began writing in Greek (Greek language), and by the Byzantine Period they converted to Christianity. Paul Johnson, ''A History of the Jews'' (London 1987) Achaemenid (Achaemenid Empire) Arabia corresponded to the lands between Egypt and Mesopotamia, later known as Arabia Petraea. According to Herodotus, Cambyses (Cambyses II) did not subdue the Arabs when he attacked Egypt in 525 BCE. His successor Darius the Great (Darius I of Persia) does not mention the Arabs in the Behistun Inscription from the first years of his reign, but mentions them in later texts. This suggests that Darius conquered this part of Arabia. Arabia Encyclopaedia Iranica The '''''Limes Arabicus''''' was a desert frontier of the Roman Empire, in the province of Arabia Petraea. It ran -at its biggest extension- for about 1,500 km (Kilometer), from Northern Syria to Southern Palestine and northern Arabia, forming part of the wider Roman ''limes'' system. It had several forts and watchtowers.


284

Arabia had so little that it was able to define itself as Roman and that spurred its loyalty to an Imperial Rome that may never have existed. With Emperor Diocletian's restructuring of the empire (Tetrarchy) in 284–305, Arabia province was enlarged to include parts of modern-day Israel. Arabia after Diocletian became a part of the Diocese of Oriens ("the East"), which was part of the Prefecture of Oriens (Praetorian prefecture of the East). During Byzantine rule

(they were abandoned soon after Trajan's death); and Pannonia has been split into two (the split occurred c107). In reality provincial borders were modified several times during the period 30 BC-284 AD: this explains any discrepancy with other sources, as to a legion's location at a particular date The fifth century account by Sozomen (''Historia Ecclesiastica'' Book II 4-54) is the most detailed account of the practices at Mamre during the early Christian period. ref name "JETCHP


cultural presence

and deprivation by the Parthians and Palmyrenes (Palmyra), it had nothing like the constant incursions faced in other areas on the Roman frontier, such as Germany and North Africa, nor the entrenched cultural presence that defined the other, more Hellenized, eastern provinces. Geography thumb 450px The Roman Empire in the time of Hadrian (File:Roman Empire 125.png) (ruled AD 117–38), showing, in western Asia, the imperial province of '''Arabia Petraea''' (Jordan NW Saudi Arabia


political acts

, and also the birthplace of M. Julius Phillipus — Phillip the Arab. Severus had enlarged a province that was already huge. He then proceeded to enlarge the empire, through the conquest of Mesopotamia. The transfer of the Leja’ and Jebel Drūz seemed to have been part of a shrewd series of political acts on the emperor’s part to consolidate control of the area before this conquest. Arabia became the ideological power base for Septemius Severus in the Roman Near East. The obvious need


current term

Greek : ''Αραβία''). The Romans (ancient Rome) named three regions with the prefix "Arabia", encompassing a larger area than the current term "Arabian Peninsula": * Arabia Petraea: for the area that is today southern modern Syria, Jordan, the Sinai Peninsula and northwestern Saudi Arabia. It was the only one that became a province (Roman province), with Petra as its capital. * Arabia Deserta ("Desert Arabia"): signified the desert


presence

and deprivation by the Parthians and Palmyrenes (Palmyra), it had nothing like the constant incursions faced in other areas on the Roman frontier, such as Germany and North Africa, nor the entrenched cultural presence that defined the other, more Hellenized, eastern provinces. Geography thumb 450px The Roman Empire in the time of Hadrian (File:Roman Empire 125.png) (ruled AD 117–38), showing, in western Asia, the imperial province of '''Arabia Petraea''' (Jordan NW Saudi Arabia

, and Tabae in Somalia developed a lucrative trade network (Trade route) connecting with merchants from Phoenicia, Ptolemic Egypt (Ptolemaic Kingdom), Greece, Parthian Persia (Parthian Empire), Sheba, Nabataea (Nabataeans) and the Roman Empire. They used the ancient Somali maritime vessel known as the ''beden'' to transport their cargo. After the Roman conquest of the Nabataean Empire (Arabia Petraea) and the Roman naval presence at Aden to curb piracy, Arab

people Arab merchants barred Indian merchants from trading in the free port cities of the Arabian Peninsula because of the nearby Roman presence. However, they continued to trade in the port cities of the Somali peninsula, which was free from any Roman threat or spies. The reason for barring Indian ships from entering the wealthy Arabian port cities was to protect and hide the exploitative trade practices of the Somali and Arab merchants in the extremely lucrative ancient Red Sea


rome

Palaestina Salutaris flag_s1 s2 Ghassanids flag_s2 s3 Rashidun Caliphate flag_s3 Black flag.svg capital Petra and Bostra latd 32 latm 30 latNS N longd 34 longm 54 longEW E common_languages Koine Greek, Aramaic, Latin, Hebrew religion Imperial cult (ancient Rome), Second Temple Judaism, Early Christianity event_start Roman conquest event1 Establishment

; Romanization With Roman conquest came the imposition of Latin (Latin language) and Greek in official discourse. This was standard for a province in Eastern Rome, but Arabia had far less of the history of Hellenization and Romanization than its neighbors, and the Greek language was little used before its introduction by the Romans. After the conquest, though, Greek was adopted popularly, as well as officially, practically supplanting Nabataean and Aramaic, as evidenced by inscriptions

Arabia had so little that it was able to define itself as Roman and that spurred its loyalty to an Imperial Rome that may never have existed. With Emperor Diocletian's restructuring of the empire (Tetrarchy) in 284–305, Arabia province was enlarged to include parts of modern-day Israel. Arabia after Diocletian became a part of the Diocese of Oriens ("the East"), which was part of the Prefecture of Oriens (Praetorian prefecture of the East). During Byzantine rule


106

common_name Arabia continent South-West Asia region Transjordan image_map Arabia Petraea.svg era subdivision Province nation the Roman Empire year_start 106 year_end 630s year_event1 390 p1 Nabatean kingdom flag_p1 p2 Decapolis flag_p2 Vexilloid of the Roman Empire.svg s1

gained the appellative “Traiane” when Trajan declared it the capital while Hadrian performed the same ceremonial act for Petra when he became emperor. History Roman conquest Before Roman control, the area was ruled by Rabbel II, last king of the Nabataeans until 106 AD. When Rabbel II, who had ruled since 70 AD, died, the Third Cyrenaica legion (Legio III Cyrenaica) moved north from Egypt into Petra, while the Legio VI Ferrata Sixth

Press, 1993) Category:Ancient Roman provinces Category:Ancient history of Jordan Category:Nabataea Category:History of Palestine Category:Sinai Peninsula Category:Southern Levant Category:106 establishments in the Roman Empire Category:100s establishments in Asia Category:States and territories established in the 2nd century Category:States and territories disestablished in the 7th century Category:630s


ancient red

people Arab merchants barred Indian merchants from trading in the free port cities of the Arabian Peninsula because of the nearby Roman presence. However, they continued to trade in the port cities of the Somali peninsula, which was free from any Roman threat or spies. The reason for barring Indian ships from entering the wealthy Arabian port cities was to protect and hide the exploitative trade practices of the Somali and Arab merchants in the extremely lucrative ancient Red Sea

Arabia Petraea

'''Arabia Petraea''', also called '''Provincia Arabia''' or simply '''Arabia''', was a frontier province (Roman province) of the Roman Empire beginning in the 2nd century; it consisted of the former Nabataean kingdom in Jordan, southern Levant, the Sinai Peninsula and northwestern Arabian peninsula. Its capital was Petra. It was bordered on the north by Syria (Syria (Roman province)), on the west by Iudaea (Iudaea Province) (merged with Syria from 135 AD) and Aegyptus (Aegyptus (Roman province)), and on the south and east by the rest of Arabia, known as Arabia Deserta and Arabia Felix.

It was annexed by Emperor Trajan, like many other eastern frontier provinces of the Roman Empire, but held onto, unlike Armenia (History of Armenia), Mesopotamia and Assyria, well after Trajan's rule – its desert frontier being called the Limes Arabicus. It produced no usurpers and no emperors (Philippus (Philip the Arab), though Arab, was from Shahbā (Shahba), a Syrian city added to the province of Arabia at a point between 193 and 225 — Philippus was born around 204). As a frontier province, it included a desert populated by the nomadic Saraceni, and bordering the Parthian hinterland.

Though subject to eventual attack and deprivation by the Parthians and Palmyrenes (Palmyra), it had nothing like the constant incursions faced in other areas on the Roman frontier, such as Germany and North Africa, nor the entrenched cultural presence that defined the other, more Hellenized, eastern provinces.

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