Ancaster, Ontario

What is Ancaster, Ontario known for?


fact+local

. This historic house was once the property of Reverend George Sheed in 1830. Since then the house had changed ownership many times before burning to the ground in 1934. The last owner of The Hermitage was in fact local author Alma Dick-Lauder who has been referenced above. The fire that eventually consumed The Hermitage occurred directly from a party that she had been hosting. http: www.ghostwalks.com disappearinghistory dh_8_auchmar.html The shell of the old house


life international

- Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Aldershot: Michael Trolly Born in Oshawa, Ontario on February 22, 1984. A parishioner of the Anglican Catholic Church of Canada. Was home-schooled. A singer-pianist in the field of Christian music. Issued a CD entitled ''From The Middle of Your Wild Dream'' in 2002; his second CD, "Even As We Are", was released in December, 2006. As a pre-teen, served as founder and president of Youth For Life International, an anti


years running

to the advancement of Ancaster in many ways. This enterprising pioneer was named Job Loder, and he was the builder and owner of all the mills and water privileges of the whole place for many years, running grist mills, saw mill, carding and woolen mills all along the stream on the site of the present ruins. Mr Loder also had a general store close to his house in the village, where he did a running business, giving constant employment to four clerks. Finally the old gentlemen made so much money that he


time teaching

, Ontario, teaching Canadian (Canadian literature), American literature, and creative writing. He retired from full-time teaching in 2005 to devote time to his writing. Activities Representatives of all the member movements gather once every four years at the "World Assembly", where the General Committee meets to conduct official business of the fellowship. The last World Assembly occurred in July 2011 in Krakow, Poland at the Jagiellonian University


elegant setting

that Ancaster's advantages were its flourishing Union Mills and other industries combined with its elegant setting which they believed would make it the most suitable candidate for building a new county courthouse. However the war of 1812 had interrupted this original selection process and by 1816 the promising village of Hamilton was chosen instead even though Ancaster at that time was still the most influential village in Western Upper Canada. http: ourroots.ca page.aspx?id 889391&qryID 4edd6fd5-f85b-4198-8475-ae7fe4071c39 Ancaster's Heritage Page 31 Ancaster Historical Society 1973 In the latter half of the 19th century Ancaster became an unimposing gristmill hamlet and police village. Ancaster's many derelict burnt down or abandoned factories such as the gutted three story Ancaster carriage factory littered its surroundings in that era like modern ruins that shouted at a former glory. The economic reality was that these former Ancaster factories would be rebuilt elsewhere. Ancaster would not have access to a modern transportation system until the Brantford and Hamilton Electric Railway intersected Ancaster Village in 1907 thus making fresh milk and other perishable foods, general supplies and mail easily deliverable on a daily basis for the first time. The arrival of the B&H radial line corresponded with the inevitable process of change that Ancaster was undergoing that is clearly recognizable today from that of a former prominent industrial and highly influential self-sufficient village to its current status as a bedroom community of Hamilton. Interestingly, the evidence for this radial train is still easily visible in Ancaster village by a well maintained gravel path behind St. John's Anglican Church on Wilson Street. Walkers and cyclists can still follow this old radial line path down the escarpment (behind Meadowlands shopping centre) to the Hamilton Chedoke Golf Course. The radial line was dismantled in 1931 as a condition of sale from the Cataract Company. With the advent of competition from the automobile and bus companies in North America at the turn of the 20th century, generally only publicly owned streetcar companies had the financial means to survive into the 1950s. At the end of the 19th century, the townsfolk of Ancaster were certainly conscious that their town had once been a glowing star in Upper Canada that had quickly lost its luster during the Victorian age despite its second successful wave of industrialization in the 1820s. In 1897, local author Alma Dick-Lauder writing about Ancaster in the Hamilton Spectator using the colourful language of that time lamented that, ''"So who can say that new life may not once more flow to the aged village, now high and dry on old time's sand banks, bringing back her bright meridian bloom and vigour of 70 years ago? Fanned by the breath of electricity to spring like a Phoenix from her bed of ashes-ashes, understand, being principally the matter choking up the old place with a fire record unequalled since the days of Sodom, making her an object of terror to her friend, derision to her foes and a hoo-doo to the guileless insurance agent. It is rather melancholy, on a summer's day, to stand on the high bridge and watch the waters slouching by like a gang of crystal dwarfs out of a job, idling and playing and painting the 'beautiful, waving hair of the dead' grass green among the fallen ruins, which a few years ago were instinct with the hum of industry, pouring forth at stated hours, with jangle of bells, a cheerful, clattering stream of bread winners, giving life and animation to the scene, in contrast to the occasional man who now meets the casual glance up street in the sunny noon hours"''. Pen and Pencil Sketches of Wentworth Landmarks, The Spectator Printing Company 1897 Alma Dick-Lauder was referring to the fact that by 1897, although Ancaster Township had a population of 4,000, the solitary industry that remained was Egleston's gristmill. The 'fire record' Alma refers to was the burning of the following: John J. Ryckman's store in 1841, St. Johns Church in 1868, The Ancaster Knitting Factory in 1875, the Morris S. Lowrey Hotel in 1881, Egleston's foundry in 1883, Thuresson's Foundry in 1884 and finally the Ancaster Carriage Factory in 1885. By Alma's expression the 'meridian bloom of 70 years ago' she was referring to the fact that in 1820 Job Lodor had purchased the Union Mills and in so doing had instantly transformed Ancaster's industrial center to the point where it was once again, albeit temporarily, the unrivalled commercial and industrial hub of the Gore district. At the time of Alma's 1897 newspaper article, Ancaster had gone from having three schools in 1835 to just one remaining school but had managed to develop cultural institutions such as an orchestra, a literary society and an enclosed curling rink. Job Lodor as well as many other prominent as well as lesser known early Ancaster settlers left behind sometimes still legible tombstones and grave markers in the cemeteries belonging to St. John's Anglican and St. Andrew's Presbyterian Churches located on Wilson Street. According to Dick-Lauder's late 19th century description of Job Lodor, ''"Somewhere about the year of grace 1820, the 'man-of-the-time' came and took up his abode in the village where he henceforth lived and where he died and is buried, after having contributed much to the advancement of Ancaster in many ways. This enterprising pioneer was named Job Loder, and he was the builder and owner of all the mills and water privileges of the whole place for many years, running grist mills, saw mill, carding and woolen mills all along the stream on the site of the present ruins. Mr Loder also had a general store close to his house in the village, where he did a running business, giving constant employment to four clerks. Finally the old gentlemen made so much money that he didn't know what to do with it, so he sold out his mills and water privileges to a person named Mr. Russell"''. Pen and Pencil Sketches of Wentworth Landmarks, The Spectator Printing Company 1897 Alma Dick Lauder Page 10 In the same period in 1897, Lauder chronicled what would have been in that era a typical but now lost experience of travelling up the escarpment to Ancaster on horse and buggy which she fancifully described, ''"It is a royal progress, that gradual ascent to Ancaster, and even the nobodies must turn their head in right royal fashion from side to side to greet the 'woodsey smell' of the mossy fern carpet spread over the rocks there in the shade to catch a breath from 'the far off greenhouses of God' to look deep into the rocky gorge where the bridge crosses over a real Hieland stream foaming down in haste after rains, round boulders and over hollow to join fortunes with the Yuba (nickname of Ancaster's main stream) hastening from its work above at Ancaster. Just here the road begins to crawl and so do the horses, giving time to enjoy all the beauteous vale of the fountains, which lies revealed, perhaps in level beams of evening, to the never satisfied eye. Presumably it was good luck and water privileges, more that inherent good taste, which led the earliest forefathers of the hamlet to form a nucleus at Ancaster, but it is hard to imagine, looking back from the turn of the mountain, how they could possibly have made a better selection ... It would appear also that there has always been an unusual percentage of good looks amongst the Ancastrians in days gone by, as well as today"''. Pen and Pencil Sketches of Wentworth Landmarks, The Spectator Printing Company 1897 Alma Dick Lauder Page 14-15 Fiddler's Green road was apparently not named after a place or person but rather an activity. It turns out that by the late 19th century, Fiddler's Green was Ancaster's tawdry and hence very popular entertainment center once located in precisely the area between present day Ravina Court and Douglas Street. In more recent times this area was a busy hive of activity every Monday as the Ancaster Auction barn was active there until as recently as 1985. During auction Mondays, it was not an uncommon site to see farmers tackling runaway piglets or rounding up stray calves on surrounding house properties. However even during this latter period when this land was used as an auction for hogs and cattle, the remnants of an old race track on the premises was still easily visible. However, 100 years ago, this area was ''"a place where fiddlers would gather and perform at what was known as the Fiddler's Green Inn, a popular place for musicians to come and perform. The area was popular for horse racing and drinking, which in turn attracted more spectators, a common stop over or a communications point. As a great number of travelers visited the area, like any other port of call, the taverns and the inns sprang up"''. Ancaster, A Glimpse into the Past — Ancaster Information Centre and Community Services 1993, Andrew J.L. Barton The Ancaster Fair has been an annual agricultural and social event since 1850 except for 1937 when it was cancelled due to a case of infantile paralysis. Originally the fair was held at Wilson and Academy Streets in the Village core. In 1894 it moved to Wilson and Cameron Drive driving park where it remained until its centennial year in 1950 when it moved to Garner Road. After nearly 60 years at the Garner Road site, the Ancaster Fair in 2009 has moved to 630 Trinity Road. In 1976, an Ancaster Town Council vote reversed a long-standing policy that would finally allow Ancaster restaurants to apply for liquor licenses. Other than the LCBO and Brewers Retail outlets that were established in Ancaster in the 1950s, the village had up to that point been 'dry', presumably since Prohibition in Canada. Ancaster's earlier pioneers however experienced an entirely different social environment. Again according to Dick-Lauder writing in 1897, "Ancaster saw plenty of life during the rebellion of 1837 (Upper Canada Rebellion), when it was quite a frequent thing for all the inns, five in number, and many of the private houses to be full over night of redcoats passing towards the west". During this period Ancaster Township was attached variously to Nassau District, Home District, York County (York County, Ontario) (West Riding) and Halton County (Halton County, Ontario). When Halton County and Wentworth County joined temporarily from 1850 to 1854, Ancaster remained permanently attached to Wentworth County (Wentworth County, Ontario), where it remains today in the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth thumb right 200px Ruins of the Hermitage. (File:The Hermitage - back.jpg) The Hermitage (The Hermitage (Hamilton, Ontario)) is a popular site in Ancaster. This historic house was once the property of Reverend George Sheed in 1830. Since then the house had changed ownership many times before burning to the ground in 1934. The last owner of The Hermitage was in fact local author Alma Dick-Lauder who has been referenced above. The fire that eventually consumed The Hermitage occurred directly from a party that she had been hosting. http: www.ghostwalks.com disappearinghistory dh_8_auchmar.html The shell of the old house and surrounding buildings can still be visited today. One of the main draws of this old property is the legend of the property being haunted. There are ghost tours run throughout the summer with the tour guides telling haunted stories of the land and the surrounding county. Haunted Hamilton - Local Hauntings - The Hermitage, Ancaster, Ontario Griffin House (Griffin House (Ancaster)) is a historic house associated with the Underground Railroad. Government When it became part of the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth (Hamilton-Wentworth Regional Municipality, Ontario) in 1974, the Town of Ancaster absorbed the Township of Ancaster (including other hamlets like Jerseyville, Lynden and Alberton). The new town had two representatives on the regional council which totaled (with the Regional Chair) about 20 members. It was amalgamated with the nearby City of Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in 2001. The amalgamation was bitterly and unsuccessfully protested by its residents and those of adjacent communities (such as Dundas (Dundas, Ontario) and Flamborough (Flamborough, Ontario) and Glanbrook (Glanbrook, Ontario)), particularly since the Progressive Conservative (Progressive Conservative Party of Ontario) MPP (Member of Provincial Parliament (Ontario)) Toni Skarica government had promised in the last election that the amalgamation would not occur. Skarica resigned in protest, and a local Flamborough Mayor, Ted McMeekin, who led the fight in opposing the amalgamation, won the Liberal party nomination winning the by-election on an anti-amalgamation platform. Nonetheless, the amalgamation was not rescinded by the Harris government. The community is in the Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale federal electoral district (Electoral district (Canada)), represented by David Sweet of the Conservative Party of Canada, and in the Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale (Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale (provincial electoral district)) provincial electoral district represented by Ted McMeekin of the Ontario Liberal Party. Following the redistribution of Electoral Seating in 2013, the town is now located in the newly created Federal Riding of Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas. This replaced the Ancaster - Dundas - Flamborough - Westdale Riding. Education Ancaster was part of the Wentworth County Board of Education since its inception, and was covered by the Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board when it was created in 1998. The town's only public institute of secondary education was Ancaster High School until 2005. Today, it is no longer classified as a vocational school, its official name is Ancaster High School. Other secondary schools in Ancaster are Bishop Tonnos Secondary School belonging to the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board, and Hamilton District Christian High School, an independent Christian high school that moved to Ancaster in 1989. Public elementary schools in Ancaster include Fessenden, Rousseau, and C.H. Bray (kindergarten to Grade 6) and these students upon graduation generally end up going to Ancaster Senior Public School (grades 7 and 8) except for Ancaster Meadow public elementary students (kindergarten to grade 8). In the Catholic elementary school system, St. Ann's, St. Joachim's, Holy Name of Mary and Immaculate Conception students (kindergarten to grade 8) generally end up at Bishop Tonnos Secondary School. Post-secondary is only available at Redeemer University College, a Christian institution closely associated with the Christian Reformed Church (Christian Reformed Church in North America). It was incorporated in 1980 and began classes in Hamilton two years later. It built a campus in Ancaster in 1986 where it had its first graduating class. It had cooperative relations with McMaster University, which provided some instructors and some cross-listed courses. By 2000, it had acquired its present name and its graduates obtained Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees, instead of Bachelors of Christian Studies. The Ancaster Public Library, a branch of the Hamilton Public Library System, originated in 1955 as a member of the Library System of Ontario. It was eventually relocated to 300 Wilson Street East in 1967 as a Centennial project after several previous moves. The library was reopened on November 27, 2006 after an extensive project that involved extending the library to include the entire first floor of the building. Sports and Recreation The Hamilton Golf and Country Club was founded in 1894 and was originally sited beside the Hamilton Jockey Club (now Centre Mall), moving to Ancaster in 1916. It hosted the Canadian Open in 2003, 2006 and again in 2012. The Ancaster Rotary Centre is an addition to Morgan Firestone Arena and includes a full size fitness centre, workout complex and meeting rooms offering 10000 square feet of weights, cardio, group exercise and daycare. The complex is surrounded by the Robert E. Wade Park, Named after former mayor Bob Wade, Wal-Mart Canada's (w:Wal-Mart Canada) first three supercenters opened in Ancaster (w:Ancaster, Ontario), London (w:London, Ontario) and Stouffville, Ontario (w:Stouffville, Ontario).


team bronze

* Melissa Tancredi – 2012 Canadian Olympian (Soccer - team bronze medal), Canadian Soccer Association, Pro Soccer Player * Bob Young (Bob Young (businessman)) – former CEO of Red Hat, Inc. (Red Hat), current owner of the Hamilton Tiger-Cats See also *List of townships in Ontario References External links * Dundas-Ancaster-Dundas circle *


giving+life

with the hum of industry, pouring forth at stated hours, with jangle of bells, a cheerful, clattering stream of bread winners, giving life and animation to the scene, in contrast to the occasional man who now meets the casual glance up street in the sunny noon hours"''. Pen and Pencil Sketches of Wentworth Landmarks, The Spectator Printing Company 1897 Alma Dick-Lauder was referring to the fact that by 1897, although Ancaster Township had a population of 4,000


highly influential

has had a very significant affect on human settlement patterns throughout its prehistory and in the present day. A highly influential geographical formation has been the Niagara Escarpment consisting primarily of limestone formed from ancient fossilized sea organisms that spans from present day New York State through Ontario to Illinois. The escarpment itself created the water power that encouraged early European settlers to gravitate to the area in the late 1700s. However, this energy source

prominent industrial and highly influential self-sufficient village to its current status as a bedroom community of Hamilton. Interestingly, the evidence for this radial train is still easily visible in Ancaster village by a well maintained gravel path behind St. John's Anglican Church on Wilson Street. Walkers and cyclists can still follow this old radial line path down the escarpment (behind Meadowlands shopping centre) to the Hamilton Chedoke Golf Course. The radial line was dismantled in 1931


home recording

?PgNm TCE&Params A1ARTA0009052 Lanois, Daniel ". The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2011-29-06. working in his own studio with his brother Bob Lanois in the basement of their mother's Ancaster, Ontario home, recording local artists including Simply Saucer. Later Daniel started Grant Avenue Studios in an old house he purchased in Hamilton, Ontario.


called world

of a second ice rink to Morgan Firestone Arena is meant to be completed by March 2011. The Ancaster Little League Park is located on Jerseyville Road in Spring Valley. It is a park comprising three baseball diamonds nestled on the edge of the Dundas Valley Conservation Area. As recently as 2010 Ancaster hosted the Canadian Little League Championships and Little League Park was the main venue. In 1970 Ancaster hosted a so-called 'World T-ball' tournament. The local Ancaster team won the event

Ancaster, Ontario

Ancaster is a community located on the Niagara Escarpment, within the city of Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), Ontario, Canada. This former town was founded officially in 1793 and was one of the oldest European communities established in present day Ontario along with Windsor (Windsor, Ontario) (1749), A Short History of Ontario, Dr. Ed Whitcomb, Natural Resources Canada, 2007 Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) (1780), St. Catharines (1787–89), Grimsby (Grimsby, Ontario) (1790), Niagara-on-the-Lake (1792) and Toronto (1793).

By 1823, due in large part to its easily accessible water power located at the juncture of already existing historical trading routes, Ancaster had become Upper Canada's largest industrial and commercial center. Additionally, Ancaster had at that time attracted the 2nd largest populace (1,681) in Upper Canada trailing only Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) (population 2,500), http: www.kingstonhistoricalsociety.ca chronology.html but surpassing the populations of nearby Toronto (1,376) and Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) (1,000). ANCASTER The Past, Present and Future, A Brief prepared by The Ancaster Township Historical Society 1972 After this initial period of prosperity beginning in the late 18th century, sudden significant water and rail transportation advancements of the early 19th century would soon better benefit Ancaster's neighbouring towns situated closer to the Lake Ontario waterfront. Stationary steam engines for industries were also being rapidly developed in the 19th century that would eventually make Ancaster's water powered industries less vital. As a result, after the 1820s, Ancaster's influence during the remainder of the 19th century would begin to wane.

From the late 19th century Ancaster's population would remain static until 1946 when new subdivisions around the village were established. The population expanded further with the completion of the Hamilton-Ancaster section of Highway 403 (Highway 403 (Ontario)) in 1968 and the introduction of sewer systems in 1974. After 1970, its population essentially doubled from 15,000 residents to its present-day 33,000.

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