Aksu, Xinjiang

What is Aksu, Xinjiang known for?


translation

people able to bear arms. It is said to have produced copper, iron and orpiment. Hulsewé, A. F. P. and Loewe, M. A. N. 1979. ''China in Central Asia: The Early Stage 125 BC AD 23: an annotated translation of chapters 61 and 96 of the History of the Former Han Dynasty'', p. 162. E. J. Brill, Leiden. The territory of Gumo was roughly situated in the counties of Baicheng (Baicheng County) and Wensu and the city of Aksu of nowadays. http

for Buddhist Translation and Research. Berkeley, California. In the 7th, 8th, and early 9th centuries, control of the entire region was often contested by the Chinese Tang dynasty, the Tibetan Tufan Empire, and the Uyghur Empire; cities frequently changed hands. Tibet seized Aksu in 670, but Tang forces reconquered the region in 692. Tibet regained the Tarim Basin in the late 720s, and the Tang dynasty again annexed the region in the 740s. The Battle of Talas led


white water

ئاقسۇ Aqsu Ak̡su ; ), is a city in and the seat of Aksu Prefecture, Xinjiang, lying at the northern edge of the Tarim Basin. The name Aksu literally means ''white water'' (in Turkic), and is used for both the oasis town and the river (Aksu River (Xinjiang)). The economy of Aksu is mostly agricultural, with cotton, in particular long-staple cotton, as the main product. Also produced are grain, fruits, oils, and beets. The industry mostly consists


year high

low C 12.1 Jun low C 14.8 Jul low C 16.6 Aug low C 15.6 Sep low C 10.8 Oct low C 3.7 Nov low C −3.1 Dec low C −10.0 year high C 17.6 year low C 3.9 year high F 63.6 year low F 39.1 precipitation colour Jan precipitation mm 1.6 Feb precipitation mm 2.4 Mar precipitation mm 3.5 Apr precipitation mm 2.5 May precipitation mm 8.9 Jun precipitation mm 14.0 Jul precipitation mm 16.0 Aug precipitation mm 14.1 Sep precipitation mm


title wild

; and by September, 1827, collected in Aksu (Aksu, Xinjiang) an army of 70,000, under command of military governor of Ili Chang Ling, that in January, 1828, moved against Jahangir Khoja. Other sources say that the Chinese Governor lead 80,000 Chinese Muslim (Hui people) troops against Jahangir.


founding+character

, as reflected in the choice of the "East Turkestan" name used in its founding constitution, the first coins of the new government were initially minted (mint (coin)) under the name "Republic of Uyghurstan" (''Uyghurstan Jumhuriyiti''). In some sources, it is known as the "East Turkestan Islamic Republic", suggesting a greater role for Islam in its founding character. The extent of Islam's influence in the foundation of the ETR is disputed; while the constitution


intense

Qings, were not brought and used in the battle , contrary Qing troops applied well-organized intense cannon fire across Tuman River on positions of Jahangir troops, bringing them into confusion. Mercenaries from Badakhshan, Kokand, Kunduz fled first, then Kashgarians lost ground, Qing troops rushed to Kashgar and upon entering the city performed the whole-scale massacre of local population, about 20,000 civilians had been slaughtered. Jahangir himself managed to escape and hide in mountainous


detailed

and a little extra. See also * Silk Road transmission of Buddhism References Further reading *Hill, John E. (2009) ''Through the Jade Gate to Rome: A Study of the Silk Routes during the Later Han Dynasty, 1st to 2nd Centuries CE''. BookSurge, Charleston, South Carolina. ISBN 978-1-4392-2134-1. *Puri, B. N. ''Buddhism in Central Asia'', Motilal Banarsidass Publishers Private Limited, Delhi, 1987. (2000 reprint). *Stein, Aurel M. 1907. ''Ancient Khotan: Detailed report

of archaeological explorations in Chinese Turkestan'', 2 vols. Clarendon Press. Oxford. Aurel M. 1921. ''Serindia: Detailed report of explorations in Central Asia and westernmost China'', 5 vols. London & Oxford. Clarendon Press. Reprint: Delhi. Motilal Banarsidass. 1980. Taishan. 2004. ''A History of the Relationships between the Western and Eastern Han, Wei, Jin, Northern and Southern Dynasties and the Western


historical works

Regions''. Sino-Platonic Papers No. 131 March, 2004. Dept. of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Pennsylvania. External links * Silk Road Seattle - University of Washington (The Silk Road Seattle website contains many useful resources including a number of full-text historical works) Category:Central Asian Buddhist kingdoms


silk

to the gradual withdrawal of Chinese forces, and the region was then contested between the Uyghurs and Tibetans. Aksu was positioned on a junction of trade routes: the northern-Tarim route Silk road, and the dangerous route north via the Tian Shan's Muzart Pass to the fertile Ili River valley.

and a little extra. See also * Silk Road transmission of Buddhism References Further reading *Hill, John E. (2009) ''Through the Jade Gate to Rome: A Study of the Silk Routes during the Later Han Dynasty, 1st to 2nd Centuries CE''. BookSurge, Charleston, South Carolina. ISBN 978-1-4392-2134-1. *Puri, B. N. ''Buddhism in Central Asia'', Motilal Banarsidass Publishers Private Limited, Delhi, 1987. (2000 reprint). *Stein, Aurel M. 1907. ''Ancient Khotan: Detailed report

Regions''. Sino-Platonic Papers No. 131 March, 2004. Dept. of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Pennsylvania. External links * Silk Road Seattle - University of Washington (The Silk Road Seattle website contains many useful resources including a number of full-text historical works) Category:Central Asian Buddhist kingdoms


year low

low C 12.1 Jun low C 14.8 Jul low C 16.6 Aug low C 15.6 Sep low C 10.8 Oct low C 3.7 Nov low C −3.1 Dec low C −10.0 year high C 17.6 year low C 3.9 year high F 63.6 year low F 39.1 precipitation colour Jan precipitation mm 1.6 Feb precipitation mm 2.4 Mar precipitation mm 3.5 Apr precipitation mm 2.5 May precipitation mm 8.9 Jun precipitation mm 14.0 Jul precipitation mm 16.0 Aug precipitation mm 14.1 Sep precipitation mm

Aksu, Xinjiang

'''Aksu''' (also transliterated (transliteration) '''Akesu''', '''Ak-su''', '''Akshu''', '''Aqsu'''; also known as '''Bharuka''' and '''Po-lu-chia'''; ), is a city in and the seat of Aksu Prefecture, Xinjiang, lying at the northern edge of the Tarim Basin. The name Aksu literally means ''white water'' (in Turkic), and is used for both the oasis town and the river (Aksu River (Xinjiang)).

The economy of Aksu is mostly agricultural, with cotton, in particular long-staple cotton, as the main product. Also produced are grain, fruits, oils, and beets. The industry mostly consists of weaving, cement, and chemical industries.

The land currently under the administration of the Aksu City is divided in two parts, separated by the Aral (Aral, Xinjiang) City. The northern part hosts the city center, while the southern part is occupied by the Taklamakan Desert.

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