Agadez

What is Agadez known for?


camel

Annuaire_ins_2011 population.pdf title Annuaires_Statistiques publisher Institut National de la Statistique du Niger accessdate 2 May 2013 History The city was founded before the fourteenth century and gradually became the most important Tuareg (Tuareg people) city, supplanting Assodé, by growing around trans-Saharan trade. The city still sees the arrival of caravan (Camel train)s, bringing salt from Bilma. In 1449, Agadez

became a sultanate (Sultanate of Agadez), while around 1500 it was conquered by the Songhai Empire. At this point, the city had a population of around 30,000 people and was a key passage for the medieval caravan (Camel train)s trading between the West African cities of Kano (and as a result Hausa language is the traditional lingua franca between different ethnic groups in the city, especially in the area of trade, religion and administration (government) administration

Palace (now a hotel) and the Agadez Sultan's Palace. The city is also known for its camel market and its silver and leatherwork. Some popular local musicians have found recognition in the west, like Tuareg guitar player Bombino (Bombino (musician)) and his band Group Bombino, Group Inerane and others. Mdou Moctar's film, ''Akounak Teggdalit Taha Tazoughai'', is set and filmed on location in Agadez.


quot portraits

, based in Agadez. External links Audio interview with Agadez resident about life in Agadez. Great place * http: www.agadez.org Site covering Northern Niger. Photo Gallery by Michel Batlle "portraits de femmes touarègues" * interactive Map


site covering

, based in Agadez. External links Audio interview with Agadez resident about life in Agadez. Great place * http: www.agadez.org Site covering Northern Niger. Photo Gallery by Michel Batlle "portraits de femmes touarègues" * interactive Map

of the Agadez region. * http: www.agadez-niger.com Site covering Agadez and Touareg culture. * Agadez, the touareg capital of the nigerien region of Air


national de

Annuaire_ins_2011 population.pdf title Annuaires_Statistiques publisher Institut National de la Statistique du Niger accessdate 2 May 2013 History The city was founded before the fourteenth century and gradually became the most important Tuareg (Tuareg people) city, supplanting Assodé, by growing around trans-Saharan trade. The city still sees the arrival of caravan (Camel train)s, bringing salt from Bilma. In 1449, Agadez


salt

Annuaire_ins_2011 population.pdf title Annuaires_Statistiques publisher Institut National de la Statistique du Niger accessdate 2 May 2013 History The city was founded before the fourteenth century and gradually became the most important Tuareg (Tuareg people) city, supplanting Assodé, by growing around trans-Saharan trade. The city still sees the arrival of caravan (Camel train)s, bringing salt from Bilma. In 1449, Agadez

Tuareg (Tuareg people) occupy the Aïr Mountains and Agadez to the west, and still operate the salt caravans for Hausa (Hausa people) merchants, the true inhabitants of the Ténéré, found from oases like Fachi eastwards, are the non-Berber Kanuri (Kanuri people) and Toubou, the latter thought to be descended from among the original inhabitants of the Sahara. Cities The "capital" of the Ténéré is the town of Agadez, south of the Aïr Mountains and west

of the Tenere. There are also various oasis settlements, some like Bilma and Seguedine based on salt production. Administration and economy Bilma is the administrative seat of the Bilma Department, covering some of north eastern Niger. While it continues to produce salt in large ''natron'' salt pans, and this salt is still sold for livestock use throughout west Africa, tourism (based out of Agadez and the Aïr Mountains some


main international

to the east) is of growing importance. Timia lies south of Iferouane and north of Agadez. The main town lies around 3 km from a stone Guelta oasis, which holds water year round. It is also known for its fruit trees, an unusual sight in the Saharan regions of northern Niger.


interpretations

;God is the center of the universe, we are one with God" and "no matter where you go God and I shall always be with you and protect you" are common Saharan interpretations. Those of the Muslim faith believe that the arms of the cross will disperse all evil from the individual, thus keeping him out of harms way. Tuareg parents are known to give these exquisite silver crosses to their children when they are about to depart from home but they are worn by all as a form of good luck


People

;ed., Vol. 1. 1911. is the largest city in northern Niger, with a population of 88,569 (2005 census). It lies in the Sahara and is the capital of Aïr, one of the traditional Tuareg (Tuareg people)–Berber (Berber people) federations. The city is also the capital of the Agadez Region. As of 2011, the urban commune had a total population of 124,324 people.

Annuaire_ins_2011 population.pdf title Annuaires_Statistiques publisher Institut National de la Statistique du Niger accessdate 2 May 2013 History The city was founded before the fourteenth century and gradually became the most important Tuareg (Tuareg people) city, supplanting Assodé, by growing around trans-Saharan trade. The city still sees the arrival of caravan (Camel train)s, bringing salt from Bilma. In 1449, Agadez

became a sultanate (Sultanate of Agadez), while around 1500 it was conquered by the Songhai Empire. At this point, the city had a population of around 30,000 people and was a key passage for the medieval caravan (Camel train)s trading between the West African cities of Kano (and as a result Hausa language is the traditional lingua franca between different ethnic groups in the city, especially in the area of trade, religion and administration (government) administration


guitar music

to the region, with many small towns gaining valuable tourism revenue. In 2004, a locust invasion ravaged many gardens, bringing scarcity and contributing to the Second Tuareg Rebellion (beginning in 2007) which continues to plague the region, effectively ending the nascent tourist industry. Geels (2006) Music of Niger includes the guitar music of the Tuaregs of Agadez as performed by Group Inerane, Group Bombino and others. While the well known Tuareg (Tuareg people) occupy the Aïr Mountains and Agadez to the west, and still operate the salt caravans for Hausa (Hausa people) merchants, the true inhabitants of the Ténéré, found from oases like Fachi eastwards, are the non-Berber Kanuri (Kanuri people) and Toubou, the latter thought to be descended from among the original inhabitants of the Sahara. Cities The "capital" of the Ténéré is the town of Agadez, south of the Aïr Mountains and west of the Tenere. There are also various oasis settlements, some like Bilma and Seguedine based on salt production. Administration and economy Bilma is the administrative seat of the Bilma Department, covering some


popular local

Palace (now a hotel) and the Agadez Sultan's Palace. The city is also known for its camel market and its silver and leatherwork. Some popular local musicians have found recognition in the west, like Tuareg guitar player Bombino (Bombino (musician)) and his band Group Bombino, Group Inerane and others. Mdou Moctar's film, ''Akounak Teggdalit Taha Tazoughai'', is set and filmed on location in Agadez.

Agadez

'''Agadez''', formerly spelled '''Agades''', "Air (s:1911 Encyclopædia Britannica Air (country))" in the ''Encyclopædia Britannica'', 11th ed., Vol. 1. 1911. is the largest city in northern Niger, with a population of 88,569 (2005 census). It lies in the Sahara and is the capital of Aïr, one of the traditional Tuareg (Tuareg people)–Berber (Berber people) federations. The city is also the capital of the Agadez Region. As of 2011, the urban commune had a total population of 124,324 people.

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