Östersund

What is Östersund known for?


range bringing

and the many passages in the mountain range, bringing warmer Atlantic (Atlantic ocean) winds to the city during winters. This somewhat maritime (Maritime climate) character also makes the summers in the city rather cool, in comparison to other towns in inland Scandinavia, which all have a more continental climate with cold winters and warm summers. Though Östersund is in fact affected by the gulf stream it lacks the high frequency of rain following


business life

and coffeehouses. Unlike Prästgatan this street is not a pedestrian street. Östersund is the city in Sweden with the most square metres of window display per capita. commons:Östersund


rich association

. commons:Östersund


large green

along with construction lots. These lots shifted with a construction lot alternating with a spice garden lot. The garden lots are no longer existent since they too have been constructed upon. Many of the fences that separated each lot from another with trees and verdure were left intact. The large green areas are still present, with parks such as ''Kyrkparken'', ''Österängsparken'' and ''Badhusparken'' being the most prominent. Badhusparken was once the location of a large bath house (Public bathing) (hence the name ''Badhus''-) though it was torn down in 1881 when the railway was constructed. A new larger two-storey pompous bath house was later built on poles a few metres from the shore, enabling the population to bathe in the waters of Storsjön during summers. This house was also torn down, when a new bath house with heated water was founded in 1938. Pentén, Gudrun (1986). "Så byggdes Östersund" (in Swedish) in Jörgen Björklund: ''Östersunds historia III'', p. 368. thumb 250px The national romantic Sparbanken building illuminated during the Winter Festival. (File:Östersund winter festival.jpg) When Östersund started to grow as a city in the late 19th century the houses consisted predominantly of wood, though stone had become popular in the central parts. These houses were heavily characterized by Neo-Gothicism (Gothic Revival architecture) and Neo-Renaissance. Pentén, Gudrun (1986). "Så byggdes Östersund" (in Swedish) in Jörgen Björklund: ''Östersunds historia III'', p. 360. A very common feature of these houses were towers, some even resembling those on old castles like the one on Hotell Grand at the main square. In the early 20th century a new age had come and in the main road, Prästgatan, the new age came fiercely. The wooden houses were replaced by stone buildings, because a city's well being was measured in how many stone buildings it had. At the same time military barracks were constructed in connection to the older settlement. Pentén, Gudrun (1986). "Så byggdes Östersund" (in Swedish) in Jörgen Björklund: ''Östersunds historia III'', p. 371. Jugendstil became popular too as an addition to the National Romantic style architecture. left 250px thumb Storgatan in Östersund with an alley, a window to the west, down towards Storsjön. (File:Storgatan in Östersund.jpg) In the 1930s, the functionalistic style (Functionalism (architecture)) made itself apparent in Östersund's outskirts, which were growing. In the 1940s, the city was made more car-friendly and the city was first and foremost planned for cars. Pentén, Gudrun (1986). "Så byggdes Östersund" (in Swedish) in Jörgen Björklund: ''Östersunds historia III'', p. 407. Later the sanitarian issues was brought up, which resulted in the construction of a sewage treatment works and the waste water was no longer flushed directly into Storsjön. Östersund was also affected by the Million Programme, though to a lesser extent than other cities. During the same period older buildings such as Hotell Grand (to make room for ''Storsjöteatern''), Cellfängelset (a jail located at the beginning of Prästgatan), Flickskolan (the girl school next to the city hall, where the current county library is located) and Västra stationen (at Badhusparken) were torn down. The local media described it all as e.g. "demolishing madness". Pentén, Gudrun (1986). "Så byggdes Östersund" (in Swedish) in Jörgen Björklund: ''Östersunds historia III'', p. 422. When the Good Templar house was threatened in order to widen Rådhusgatan the city's inhabitants had had enough and the building was saved. thumb Storgatan with a "spice garden lot" to the left. (File:Storgatan Östersund.jpg) The buildings along ''Storgatan'' (literally: "the great road") with entire segments intact since the 1880s are considered one of the best preserved city settlements in Sweden. The wooden façades are rich with details and the house are relatively low, short and slim. A great amount of work was put down on creating a balance between details and entirety. Parallel with Storgatan lies ''Prästgatan'' — "the priest road", Östersund's main shopping street. The buildings between the two roads are often connected and the roads create small rooms mostly inaccessible for keen winds. These so-called rooms also stimulate the social life on the streets. ''Stortorget'' — the main town square in central Östersund is one of six "closed squares" built in Sweden, the others being the ones in Uppsala, Karlstad, Vimmerby, Piteå and Haparanda. It was created through indentation in four different blocks to deliberately create an open air room with openings to every direction. A style deriving from how cities were planned during the Renaissance. However the town square lost its original shape when it was "opened up" and expanded towards the lake. Stortorget has long been the city's main market place and core, it is also here that the thousand year old market ''Gregorie market'' is held each year in March. The city festival ''Storsjöyran'' has Stortorget as its main centre. Districts and housing estates Before Östersund was established the population in the area was very scarce. In Odensala and Torvalla older settlements existed, the name Odensala can be derived from the Viking age and the Halls of Odin (though Torvalla means "dry wealds" with no reference to Thor). These two villages were later incorporated into Östersund and are today two major urban districts. Besides them the urban districts of Odenskog, Odensvik, Odenslund, Karlslund, Erikslund, Lugnvik, Lillänge and Söder (Söder, Östersund) along with the new district Stadsdel Norr are found on the mainland. On Frösön, recently included into the city are the three urban districts Hornsberg, Mjälle and Valla (Valla, Östersund). The central parts of Östersund are a part of the urban district ''Staden (Staden, Östersund)'' — "the city", which has become synonymous with Östersund for many people living in the nearby villages and towns. As Östersund is the only city in the area and nearest city for many it is common to call it ''Stan'', though the dative form (dative case) ''Staa'' has increasingly grown unusual. The residents of Östersunds are referred to as ''östersundare'', though local ruralists call them ''stassbon'' "towners", and ''stassbo'' "towner", in singular (grammatical number). commons:Östersund


events title

and restaurants gather near the lake. *Jamtli Christmas Market is well attended market taking place the second weekend of Advent. *Expo Norr, Sweden's oldest merchandise trade fair held in June with roughly 400 exhibitors. commons:Östersund


style made

(architecture) functionalistic style made itself apparent in Östersund's outskirts, which were growing. In the 1940s, the city was made more car-friendly and the city was first and foremost planned for cars. Pentén, Gudrun (1986). "Så byggdes Östersund" (in Swedish) in Jörgen Björklund: ''Östersunds historia III'', p. 407. Later the sanitarian issues was brought up, which resulted in the construction of a sewage treatment works and the waste water was no longer flushed


treatment works

(architecture) functionalistic style made itself apparent in Östersund's outskirts, which were growing. In the 1940s, the city was made more car-friendly and the city was first and foremost planned for cars. Pentén, Gudrun (1986). "Så byggdes Östersund" (in Swedish) in Jörgen Björklund: ''Östersunds historia III'', p. 407. Later the sanitarian issues was brought up, which resulted in the construction of a sewage treatment works and the waste water was no longer flushed directly into Storsjön. Östersund was also affected by the Million Programme, though to a lesser extent than other cities. During the same period older buildings such as Hotell Grand (to make room for ''Storsjöteatern''), Cellfängelset (a jail located at the beginning of Prästgatan), Flickskolan (the girl school next to the city hall, where the current county library is located) and Västra stationen (at Badhusparken) were torn down. The local media described it all as e.g. "demolishing madness". Pentén, Gudrun (1986). "Så byggdes Östersund" (in Swedish) in Jörgen Björklund: ''Östersunds historia III'', p. 422. When the Good Templar house was threatened in order to widen Rådhusgatan the city's inhabitants had had enough and the building was saved. thumb Storgatan with a "spice garden lot" to the left. (File:Storgatan Östersund.jpg) The buildings along ''Storgatan'' (literally: "the great road") with entire segments intact since the 1880s are considered one of the best preserved city settlements in Sweden. The wooden façades are rich with details and the house are relatively low, short and slim. A great amount of work was put down on creating a balance between details and entirety. Parallel with Storgatan lies ''Prästgatan'' — "the priest road", Östersund's main shopping street. The buildings between the two roads are often connected and the roads create small rooms mostly inaccessible for keen winds. These so-called rooms also stimulate the social life on the streets. ''Stortorget'' — the main town square in central Östersund is one of six "closed squares" built in Sweden, the others being the ones in Uppsala, Karlstad, Vimmerby, Piteå and Haparanda. It was created through indentation in four different blocks to deliberately create an open air room with openings to every direction. A style deriving from how cities were planned during the Renaissance. However the town square lost its original shape when it was "opened up" and expanded towards the lake. Stortorget has long been the city's main market place and core, it is also here that the thousand year old market ''Gregorie market'' is held each year in March. The city festival ''Storsjöyran'' has Stortorget as its main centre. Districts and housing estates Before Östersund was established the population in the area was very scarce. In Odensala and Torvalla older settlements existed, the name Odensala can be derived from the Viking age and the Halls of Odin (though Torvalla means "dry wealds" with no reference to Thor). These two villages were later incorporated into Östersund and are today two major urban districts. Besides them the urban districts of Odenskog, Odensvik, Odenslund, Karlslund, Erikslund, Lugnvik, Lillänge and Söder (Söder, Östersund) along with the new district Stadsdel Norr are found on the mainland. On Frösön, recently included into the city are the three urban districts Hornsberg, Mjälle and Valla (Valla, Östersund). The central parts of Östersund are a part of the urban district ''Staden (Staden, Östersund)'' — "the city", which has become synonymous with Östersund for many people living in the nearby villages and towns. As Östersund is the only city in the area and nearest city for many it is common to call it ''Stan'', though the dative form (dative case) ''Staa'' has increasingly grown unusual. The residents of Östersunds are referred to as ''östersundare'', though local ruralists call them ''stassbon'' "towners", and ''stassbo'' "towner", in singular (grammatical number). commons:Östersund


light live

*The Winter Festival is the name for all the events that took place during the Biathlon World Championships 2008. It included a ''festival of light'', live music, new school skiing at the town square, a film


romantic architecture

hall.jpg thumb left Östersund City Hall The most well known landmark of Östersund is the national romantic city hall (Östersund City Hall). It is 51 meters tall and contains 136 rooms. It is the greatest constructional symbol of the National Romantic architecture in Östersund. Pentén, Gudrun (1986). "Så byggdes Östersund" (in Swedish) in Jörgen Björklund: ''Östersunds historia III'', p. 387. The city hall looks almost like a fortress and affiliates especially


wild life

for tourists. Featuring over 700 animals from Tigers to Koalas and Sloths. The area also have restaurants, a tivoli, circus and Sweden's largest tropical house. Perfect for all ages, however there can be very crowded during high season by Swedes and Norwegians on holiday. Frösö Zoo also houses a lot of wild animals like lynx, bear and other Swedish wild life. Definitely worth a visit! *

Östersund

'''Östersund''' ( ) is an urban area (Urban areas in Sweden) (city (Stad (Sweden))) in Jämtland in the middle of Sweden. It is the seat of Östersund Municipality and the capital of Jämtland County. Östersund is located at the shores of Sweden's fifth largest lake, Storsjön, opposite the island Frösön, and is the only city in Jämtland. Östersund is the region's cultural and economical centre and by tradition a city of trade and commerce. Östersund had one of the most extensive garrisons in Sweden prior to its closure in the early 21st century. The city is the Mid Sweden University's largest campus site with approximately 7 000 students. With a total population of 44,327 (2010) Östersund is the 24th most populous city in Sweden (List of cities in Sweden by population), the 46th most populous city in Scandinavia (List of cities in Scandinavia by population), and by far the largest inland city in Northern Sweden (Norrland).

The city was the only Swedish city founded and chartered in the 18th century. Östersund was founded in order to create a trade monopoly over Jämtland whose inhabitants' lucrative trade annoyed the Swedish crown. The intention was to persuade the local farmers to deliver merchandise to middlemen in Östersund, but the population opposed this economic philosophy, and Östersund long remained small. Jacobsson, Hans (1992). "Östersunds tillkomst" (in Swedish) in Sten Rentzhog: ''Jämten 1993'', p. 140-145 It took until the end of the 19th century for Östersund to truly become a city, after the arrival of the railroad and the economic liberalization of that time.

Östersund is situated in inland Scandinavia and connected to Sundsvall in the east on the Swedish coast, and Trondheim in the west at the shores of the Norwegian sea. Östersund is located in the middle of Scandinavia, in the middle of Sweden, in the middle of Jämtland County and in the middle of Östersund Municipality. As the most centrally located city in Sweden, the city credits itself as the ''centre of Sweden (Geographical center of Sweden)''. Familjen Medelsvensson - The average Swedish family Statistics Sweden

Östersund is marketed as ''Vinterstaden'' — Winter City. Vinterstaden Official website

Search by keywords:


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017