Ávila, Spain

What is Ávila, Spain known for?


professional training

to what has been called ''brick Romanesque'' style. Centers of Mudéjar art are found in other cities, such as Toro (Toro (Spain)), Cuéllar, Arévalo and Madrigal de las Altas Torres. 250px thumb Ávila Police Academy (Image:Academia Policía.JPG) If the applicant has been chosen, they will receive professional training in Ávila (Ávila, Spain)'s police academy for six months. Whilst trainees reside at the academy, they learn about Spanish law, receive firearms and self


site world

, Barcelona, Tarragona, Valencia (Valencia (city in Spain)) and Palma de Mallorca. Alfonso was put in the custody of the loyal village Ávila (Ávila, Spain). At barely fifteen, he came forth to do a man's work by restoring his kingdom to order. It was only by a surprise that he recovered his capital Toledo (Toledo, Spain) from the hands of the Laras. Thirteen Spanish cities have been declared World Heritage Cities (World Heritage Site) by the UNESCO http


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iii, iv ID 348 Region Europe and North America (List of World Heritage Sites in Europe) Year 1985 Session 9th Link http: whc.unesco.org en list 348 The Walls of Ávila Its main monument is the imposing Walls of Ávila (11th-14th centuries), the medieval work was started in 1090. The fenced area is of 31 hectares with a perimeter of approximately 2,516 metres, 88 blocks or semicircular towers, 2,500


defense training

-defense training, conduct practical application exercises, learn the basics of the English language and undergo training in crime investigation. After that, the applicant will have the ''aula práctica'', that mixes theoretical knowledge with practical situations for three months. Finally, the pupil will receive a policing practice, in which there will be various common situations that will form him as an agent. The Vettones lived in the northwestern part of the '' Geography of Spain#The Inner


important works

) capitals of the monument. Highlight the tomb of Saint Peter of the Boat and, above all, the Cenotaph of the Holy Brothers Martyrs, the head of the temple, Saint Vincent of Ávila, and her sisters, along with the torture he suffered in the 4th century, Saint Sabina and Saint Cristeta, (Cenotafio de los santos Vicente, Sabina y Cristeta), one of the most important works of Romanesque sculpture in Spain. Convento de San José File:Avila - Convento de San


commentary

. On his return to Spain he was appointed Grand Chancellor of Castile (Crown of Castile), and in 1449, Bishop of Ávila (Ávila, Spain), whence his title ''Abulensis''. Besides a Spanish commentary on the chronicles of Eusebius and other minor works, he wrote commentaries on the historical books of the Old Testament as far as Second Chronicles (Books of Chronicles), and on the Gospel according to St. Matthew (Gospel of Matthew). These are extremely diffuse, containing many digressions

on dogmatic and other subjects, which, though often excellent in themselves, are out of place in a commentary. An edition of his works in 13 folio (folio (printing)) volumes was published at Venice in 1507 and 1547; a more complete edition in 24 folio volumes appeared at the same place in 1615, and another in 27 folio volumes in 1728. Life Melchor de Jovellanos was born at Gijón in Asturias, Spain. Selecting law as his profession, he studied at Oviedo, Ávila, Spain


important architectural

Jose o de las Madres 03.jpg thumb 200px Convento de San José The Convent of Saint Joseph is the first monastery of Discalced Carmelite (Discalced Carmelites) nuns founded by Saint Teresa of Jesus (Teresa of Ávila). The convent was built in the year of 1562, although the most important architectural element, the church, was built in 1607. The Church was designed by the architect Francisco de Mora (1553-1610). It is a national monument since 1968. Iglesia de San Pedro * Start date: about 1100. * The church of Saint Peter is located outside the town walls in the Plaza de Mercado Grande at the door of the Alcazar. Presents analogous with that of San Vicente. * Latin cross floor and three naves of five sections. Apsidal chapels: mayor chapel, chapel of the south apse and chapel of the north apse. Ermita de San Segundo thumb 200px Torreón de los Guzmanes. (File:Avila Torreon de los Gusmanes.jpg) 200px thumb upright Santuario de Nuestra Señora de Sonsoles. (File:Ermitadesonsoles.jpg) Beautiful hermitage located to the west of Ávila, outside the town walls, on the right bank of the Adaja river. Highlights the sculpted capitals in which the sculptor is the footprint of the apse of San Andrés. Alabaster statue made by Juan de Juni. Popular belief has it that, on introducing a handkerchief into the tomb and asking for three wishes, the saint will grant one. His pilgrimage is celebrated on 2 May, Segundo (Saint Segundo) being the patron saint of Ávila. Palacio de Don Diego del Águila This 16th-century palace is located inside the walls and attached to it as junt walk through the door of San Vicente, defended the access of Muslim troops.


important buildings


speed quot

to the north of the country. These lines are already considered antiquated, and will be partially replaced with the new high speed Alta Velocidad Española (AVE) ("Spanish High Speed") trains, with tunnels between Miraflores de la Sierra and Segovia. The AVE can achieve speeds of up to 300 km h on dedicated tracks. The AVE route between Madrid and Segovia is already open, and the network is slowly being expanded further north. death_date


seminal book

in Europe.) It is notable for having complete and prominent medieval (Middle Ages) town walls, built in the Romanesque (Romanesque architecture) style. The town is also known as ''Ávila de los Caballeros'', ''Ávila del Rey'' and ''Ávila de los Leales'' (Ávila of the Knights, the King and the Loyalists), each of these epithets being present in the town standard (Heraldic flag). The writer José Martínez Ruiz (Azorín (José Martínez Ruiz)), in his seminal book ''El alma castellana

Ávila, Spain

'''Ávila''' ( ; Latin (Latin language): ''Abila'' and ''Obila'') is a Spanish town located in the autonomous community (Autonomous communities of Spain) of Castile and León, and is the capital of the Province of Ávila.

It is sometimes called the ''Town of Stones and Saints'', and it claims that it is one of the towns with the highest number of Romanesque and Gothic (Gothic architecture) churches (and bars and restaurants) per capita in Spain. (Zamora (Zamora, Spain), a town of similar size, claims the greatest number of Romanesque churches in Europe.) It is notable for having complete and prominent medieval (Middle Ages) town walls, built in the Romanesque (Romanesque architecture) style. The town is also known as ''Ávila de los Caballeros'', ''Ávila del Rey'' and ''Ávila de los Leales'' (Ávila of the Knights, the King and the Loyalists), each of these epithets being present in the town standard (Heraldic flag).

The writer José Martínez Ruiz (Azorín (José Martínez Ruiz)), in his seminal book ''El alma castellana'' (The Castilian Soul), described it as "perhaps the most 16th-century town in Spain", and it was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1985.

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