Places Known For

time biography


St. Joseph, Missouri

editor of the Missouri Morning Journal. Later he became the Assistant City Editor of the ''Missouri Republican'' in St. Louis (St. Louis, Missouri). This newspaper was the second oldest and largest daily newspaper at that time. Biography A native of St. Joseph, Missouri, she earned a B.S. degree in secondary education from the University of Kansas and a masters in secondary education from the University of Missouri–Kansas City.


Voronezh

in Petersburg and other cities, including the so-called Kazan demonstration of 1876, where they would openly admit the organization’s existence for the first time. Biography Kaledin graduated from the Voronezh Military School, the Mikhaylovskoye Artillery School in Saint Petersburg (1882) and the General Staff Academy (General Staff Academy (Imperial Russia)) (1889). From 1903 to 1906, he served as principal (Principal (school)) at the Novocherkassk Military School. From


Pskov

, conducted propaganda (agitprop) among workers and took part in several strikes in Petersburg in 1878-1879. It also influenced the development of the student movement by organizing or supporting demonstrations in Petersburg and other cities, including the so-called Kazan demonstration of 1876, where they would openly admit the organization’s existence for the first time. Biography Mniszech was a daughter of Polish (Poland) Voivode Jerzy Mniszech - one of the organizers of the Dimitriads (Polish-Muscovite War (1605-1618)), often viewed as a Polish invasion of Russia in the early 17th century. Marina Mniszech's marriage to the impostor False Dmitri I provided an opportunity for the Polish-Lithuanian magnates and Catholic (Roman Catholic Church) clergy to control their protégé. Mniszech met False Dmitri I around 1604 or 1605, at the court of one of the Commonwealth magnates, and agreed to marry him. In return for her hand Dmitri promised her Pskov and Novgorod, and her father Smolensk and Severia. After Dmitri captured Moscow in June 1605, in November he sent a diplomatic mission to Poland, asking for Marina's hand and proposing a military alliance to defeat the Ottomans. From 1894 to 1898 he attended the Faculty of Law of Tartu University, that he graduated as cand. jur. (Candidate of Law) After graduation, Päts served in the Russian (Imperial Russian Army) 96th Infantry Regiment of Omsk in Pskov and was promoted an ensign (Ensign (rank)). After rejecting an academic career in Tartu, he moved to Tallinn in 1900, to start a political career. ***Fëdor Danilovič (1335–1346) **'''Pskov''' - Šeloga, Governor of Pskov (1303–1308, 1338–1341) During the 12th and the 13th centuries the ''smerds'' were mentioned in a number of sources narrating the events in Halych-Volynia and Novgorod. It appears that during this period the term "''smerd''" encompassed the whole rural population of a given region. Sources of the 14th and 15th centuries refer to the ''smerds'' of Novgorod and Pskov as peasants-proprietors, who possessed lands collectively (communes) or individually and had the right to freely alienate their own allotments. However, their personal freedom was limited: they were forbidden to seek for a new master or princely patronage. The ''knyaz'' could not accept complaints from the ''smerds'' on their master. Also, the ''smerds'' had to perform certain duties called ''dani'' (дани), "tributes", or ''raboty'' (работы), "assignments", to the benefit of the city as a collective feudal master. The six upper escutcheons are joint depictions of various smaller principalities and ''oblasts''. From left to right, these are: the combined arms of the northeastern regions (Perm, Volga Bulgaria, Vyatka (Kirov, Kirov Oblast), Kondinsky, Obdorsk), of Belorussia and Lithuania (Lithuania, Białystok, Samogitia, Polatsk, Vitebsk, Mstislavl), the provinces of Great Russia proper (Pskov, Smolensk, Tver, Nizhniy-Novgorod, Ryazan, Rostov, Yaroslavl, Belozersk, Udorsky (Udorsky District)), the arms of the southwestern regions (Volhyn, Podolsk, Chernigov), the Baltic provinces (Esthonia (Governorate of Estonia), Courland and Semigalia, Karelia, Livonia (Governorate of Livonia)) and Turkestan (Russian Turkestan). Expansion of Lithuania Algirdas not only succeeded in holding his own, but acquired influence and territory at the expense of Muscovy and the Golden Horde, and extended the borders of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania to the northern shore of the Black Sea. Principal efforts of Algirdas were directed to securing the Slavonic (Slavic peoples) lands which had been a part of the former Kievan Rus (Kievan Rus'). He procured the election of his son Andrew (Andrei of Polotsk) as the Prince of Pskov, and a powerful minority of the citizens of the Republic of Novgorod held the balance in his favor against the Muscovite influence, however his ascendancy in both these commercial centres was at the best precarious. Very little is known about years when Jaunutis ruled. Those were quite peaceful years, as the Teutonic Knights were led by ineffective Ludolf König. His brothers were much more active: Algirdas attacked Mozhaysk, Livonian Order, defended Pskov, Kęstutis was helping Liubartas in succession disputes in Galicia–Volhynia. The Bychowiec Chronicle mentions that Jaunutis was supported by Jewna, presumed wife of Gediminas and mother of his children. She died ca. 1344 and soon after Jaunutis lost his throne. If he was indeed protected by his mother, then it would be an interesting example of influence held by queen mother in pagan Lithuania. However, a concrete stimulus might have been a major ''reise'' planned by the Teutonic Knights in 1345. Jaunutis was supported by his brother Narimantas, who traveled to Jani Beg, Khan of the Golden Horde, to form an alliance against Algirdas and Kęstutis. Jaunutis was imprisoned in Vilnius, but managed to escape and went to his brother-in-law Simeon of Russia in Moscow. There Jaunutis was baptized as Ioann, but failed to solicit help (possibly because his sister Aigusta (Augusta Anastasia of Lithuania), wife of Simeon, died the same year). WikiPedia:Pskov commons:Pskov


Topeka, Kansas

amplifier and a low-quality Astatic microphone. Along with learning guitar, Livgren also focused on learning to write songs due to his desire for more creative expression and originality. He attended Washburn University for some time. Biography Born in Topeka, Kansas, Menninger attended Washburn University, Indiana University (Indiana University Bloomington), and the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He was accepted to Harvard Medical School, where he graduated cum laude in 1917. While at Washburn, he was a member of the Alpha Delta Fraternity, a local group, and in 1960 inducted into the school's Sagamore Honor Society. In 1957 Tierney was seen by a neighbor as she was about to jump from a ledge. Tierney and Herskowitz (1978). Wyden Books. ''Self-Portrait''. p. 1. The police were called and she was admitted to the Menninger Clinic (Menninger Foundation) in Topeka, Kansas on December 25. She was released from Menninger the following year after a treatment that included - in its final stages - working as a sales girl in a large department store (where she was recognized by a customer, resulting in sensational newspaper headlines). Tierney and Herskowitz (1979) . Wyden Books. "Self-Portrait", pp. 197 Later that year 20th Century-Fox offered her a lead role in ''Holiday for Lovers'' (1957), but the stress proved too great. Days into production she was forced to drop out of the film and was readmitted to Menninger. He attended high school in Chicago (Chicago, Illinois), then in Topeka (Topeka, Kansas), Kansas at Topeka High School. He later stated that he studied harmony and composition for two years at Washburn College (Washburn University) in Topeka while still attending THS. In his youth he played piano and cello, and started playing saxophone at the age of nine; by the age of fourteen he was playing around eastern Kansas. Biography Ryder was born on January 16, 1892 in Topeka, Kansas. In 1915 he graduated from the United States Military Academy. In 1917–1919, he served as Major and Lt. Colonel in the 16th (16th Infantry Regiment (United States)) and 26th Infantry (26th Infantry Regiment (United States)), in the 1st Infantry Division (1st Infantry Division (United States)) in France and Germany. '''Temple of Deliverance Church of God in Christ''' was founded March 6, 1975 by the late Bishop Gilbert E. Patterson in Memphis, Tennessee. The church's current pastor is Milton Hawkins, nephew of the founder. The Temple of Deliverance Church of God in Christ is one of the largest churches in the city of Memphis and the Church of God in Christ denomination, with over 6.5 million members worldwide. The same name is also used by a church located in Topeka, Kansas. That city is notable as the location where the Pentecostal movement had its origins in 1901. 1896 novel Charles Sheldon's 1896 book, ''In His Steps'' was subtitled "What Would Jesus Do?" Sheldon, C. (1896). ''In His Steps''. First published by the ''Chicago Advance'' in serial form. Sheldon's novel grew out of a series of sermons he delivered in his Congregationalist (Congregational church) church in Topeka, Kansas. Unlike the previous nuances mentioned above, Sheldon's theology was shaped by a commitment to Christian Socialism. The ethos of Sheldon's approach to the Christian life was expressed in this phrase "What Would Jesus Do", with Jesus being a moral example as well as a Saviour figure. Charles Monroe Sheldon Central Congregational Church Collection, 1811-1984. Sheldon's ideas coalesced with those that formed into the Social Gospel espoused by Walter Rauschenbusch. Indeed Rauschenbusch acknowledged that his Social Gospel owed its inspiration directly to Sheldon's novel, and Sheldon himself identified his own theology with the Social Gospel. History The UPCI emerged out of the Pentecostal Movement, which traces its origins to the teachings of Charles Parham in Topeka, Kansas, and the Azuza Street Revival led by William J. Seymour in 1906. Rejected by the mainline churches, Pentecostals began to form organizations of their own. One of these new groups was the Assemblies of God, which formed in 1914. - Kansas KS align center 1861 Topeka (Topeka, Kansas) align center 1856 align right 56.0 align center No align right 127,473 align right 230,824 Wichita (Wichita, Kansas) is the state's largest city. - - rowspan 2 '''Topeka (Topeka, Kansas)''' Capital ''de facto'' (anti-slavery) of the Territory of Kansas. - The BNSF mechanical division operates eight locomotive maintenance facilities that perform preventive maintenance, repairs and servicing of equipment. The largest of these facilities are located in Alliance (Alliance, Nebraska), Nebraska and Topeka (Topeka, Kansas), Kansas. The mechanical division also controls 46 additional facilities responsible for car maintenance and daily running repairs. The inspiration was the US Corn Exchange and it was likely based on the very successful game '''Gavitt's Stock Exchange''', invented in 1903 by Harry E. Gavitt of Topeka, Kansas (and reprinted in 2004 in an authentic "heirloom" edition by Out of the Box Publishing). Versions of the game have been marketed under the names '''Billionaire''', '''Business''', '''Cambio''', '''Deluxe Pit''', '''Quick 7''', and '''Zaster'''. As a mascot for the franchise, Pikachu has made multiple appearances in various promotional events and merchandise. In 1998, then-Mayor of Topeka, Kansas Joan Wagnon renamed the town "Topikachu" for a day, The Topeka, Kansas (w:Topeka, Kansas)-based church led by Fred Phelps (w:Fred Phelps) sent 6 protestors with picket signs to the memorial service of 49 Ohio (w:Ohio) servicemen killed in Iraq. They were members of the Third Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment of Brook Park, Ohio (w:Brook Park, Ohio), a suburb of Cleveland (w:Cleveland, Ohio).


Medes

this time. Biography Towards the end of the Achaemenid Empire, Atropates was governor (''satrap'') of the Achaemenid province of Media (Medes). In the decisive Battle of Gaugamela (October 331 BCE) between Darius (Darius III) and Alexander, Atropates commanded the Achaemenid troops of Media (Medes), Caucasian Albania (Albania (satrapy)) and Sacasene (part of present-day Armenia). Biography Towards the end of the Achaemenid Empire, Atropates was governor (''satrap'') of the Achaemenid province of Media (Medes). In the decisive Battle of Gaugamela (October 331 BCE) between Darius (Darius III) and Alexander, Atropates commanded the Achaemenid troops of Media (Medes), Caucasian Albania (Albania (satrapy)) and Sacasene (part of present-day Armenia). Following his defeat in that battle, Darius (Darius III) fled to the Median capital of Ecbatana, where Atropates gave him hospitality. Darius attempted to raise a new army but was forced to flee Ecbatana in June 330 BCE. After Darius' death a month later at the hands of Bessus , Atropates surrendered to Alexander. Alexander initially chose Oxydates as satrap of Media (Medes), but in 328-327 BCE after Alexander lost trust in Oxydates' loyalty, Atropates was reinstated to his old position. In 325-324, Atropates delivered Baryaxes (a sought-after rebel of the region) to Alexander while the latter was at Pasargadae. Alexander's esteem for the governor rose "so high" that soon afterwards Atropates' daughter was married to Alexander's confidant and cavalry commander Perdiccas at the famous mass wedding at Susa in February 324 BCE. Alexander himself died eight months later on June 10, 323 BCE, and Atropates' new son-in-law Perdiccas was named regent of Alexander's half-brother Philip III (Philip III of Macedon). Following the "Partition of Babylon" in 323 BCE, Media (Medes) was divided into two parts: the greater portion in the south-east was to be governed by Peithon, a general of Perdiccas, while a smaller portion in the north west (principally around the Araxes River basin was given to Atropates. At some point thereafter, Atropates refused to convey allegiance to the diadochi and made his part of Media (Medes) an independent kingdom, while his son-in-law Perdiccas was eventually murdered by Peithon in the summer of 320 BCE. Alexander himself died eight months later on June 10, 323 BCE, and Atropates' new son-in-law Perdiccas was named regent of Alexander's half-brother Philip III (Philip III of Macedon). Following the "Partition of Babylon" in 323 BCE, Media (Medes) was divided into two parts: the greater portion in the south-east was to be governed by Peithon, a general of Perdiccas, while a smaller portion in the north west (principally around the Araxes River basin was given to Atropates. At some point thereafter, Atropates refused to convey allegiance to the diadochi and made his part of Media (Medes) an independent kingdom, while his son-in-law Perdiccas was eventually murdered by Peithon in the summer of 320 BCE. Despite 7,000 years history, Damghan has been forgotten beneath desert sand dunes, It is one of the most ancient urban metropolis in the Iranian plateau, with many historical monuments including Tappeh Hessar which belongs to the Median (Medes) (728-550 BCE), Parthians (248-224 CE)) and Sassanid (224-651 CE) dynastic periods — the Tarikhaneh was built as a fire temple during the Sassanid dynasty and converted into a mosque after the advent of Islam - and many other historical buildings belonging to Seljuks and other periods. The ''New Revised Standard Version'' of the Bible gives the following interpretation from Gabriel: "As for the ram that you saw with the two horns, these are the kings of Media (Medes) and Persia." The historical Cyrus was a Persian ruler whose rise began about 549 BCE. Within a few years he had conquered the kingdoms of Media (Medes) and Lydia; by 539 BCE he had conquered Babylon. There was no powerful kingdom left to oppose him. His conquests extended eastward to Turkistan; westward to Ionia; northward to Caucasia (Caucasus)--covering, in fact, much of the known civilized world. In ancient times, Zabulistan was part of the region known as Arachosia. Northern parts of the region were under control of the Medes Empire before 550 BCE, after which the province fell to the Achaemenid Persians. Alexander the Great conquered Zabul during his conquest of Persia in the 320s BCE. The region later became part of the Seleucid Empire, which traded it to the Mauryan Empire in 305 BCE as part of an alliance. The Sunga Dynasty overthrew the Mauryans in 185 BC, but shortly afterwards lost Zabul to the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom. Zabul became part of the break-away Indo-Greek Kingdom in the mid 2nd century BCE. thumb left 250px A panorama of Nevşehir (Image:Turkey.Nevşehir01.JPG) A settlement was founded on the slopes of Mount Kahveci in the valley of Kızılırmak (Kızılırmak (river)) (the ancient Halys) by the Hittites. The town along with the region came under the rule of the Assyrian Empire around the 8th century BC, then by the Medes and then by the Persians in the reign of emperor Cyrus the Great in 546 BC. In 333 BC Alexander the Great defeated the Persians. After his death, Cappadocia came under the rule of the dynasty of Ariarathes with Mazaka (present-day Kayseri) as capital. Cappadocian kingdom became part of the Roman empire, in the reign of Emperor Tiberius. ), means literally exile. Galut or Golus classically refers to the exile of the Jewish people from the Land of Israel (see: Jewish diaspora). There were altogether four such exiles. These are said to be alluded to in Abraham's biblical vision of the future of his descendants according to Bereishit Rabba (44:17): :''"And behold, a great, dark fear fell upon him." "'Fear' refers to Babylonia ... 'dark' refers to Media (Medes). ... 'great' refers to Greece.... 'fell upon him' refers to Edom.'"'' Hamadan was established by the Medes and was the capital of the Median empire. It then became one of several capital cities of the Achaemenid Dynasty. * Since Alyattes (w:Alyattes of Lydia) would not give up the Scythians (w:Scythians) to Cyaxares (w:Cyaxares) at his demand, there was war Battle of Halys (w:Battle of Halys) between the Lydians (w:Lydians) and the Medes (w:Medes) for five years; each won many victories over the other, and once they fought a battle by night. They were still warring with equal success, when it happened, at an encounter which occurred in the sixth year, that during the battle the day was suddenly turned to night (w:Battle_of_Halys_(585_BCE)#The_eclipse). Thales of Miletus had foretold this loss of daylight to the Ionians, fixing it within the year in which the change did indeed happen. ** Herodotus, ''Histories'' (w:Histories (Herodotus)#Book_I_.28Clio.29), 1.74 (c.a. 435 B.C.)


Sarajevo

WikiPedia:Sarajevo Dmoz:Regional Europe Bosnia and Herzegovina Localities Sarajevo Commons:Sarajevo


Seoul

Commons:Category:Seoul Wikipedia:Seoul


Haiti

some local homosexuals to cast a wary eye on Caucasian (Whites)s and promiscuous Singaporeans returning from Western countries. The possibility that it would become a problem here seemed remote at the time. Biography Born in Bordeaux, Tauran studied at the Pontifical Gregorian University (from where he earned licentiates in philosophy and theology, and in 1973 his Doctorate in Canon Law (Doctor of Canon Law)) and Pontifical Ecclesiastical Academy in Rome, and the Catholic Institute in Toulouse. He was ordained (Holy Orders) to the priesthood (Priesthood (Catholic Church)) by Archbishop Marius Maziers on 20 September 1969, and worked as a curate in the Archdiocese of Bordeaux (Archbishopric of Bordeaux) before entering the Vatican (Holy See)'s diplomatic (Diplomatic missions of the Holy See) service in 1975. He was secretary of the nunciatures to the Dominican Republic (1975–1978) and to Lebanon (1979–1983). Tauran became an official of the Council for the Public Affairs of the Church in 1983, and then participated in special missions in Haiti (1984), and Beirut and Damascus (1986). He was also a member of the Vatican delegation to the meetings of the Conference on European Security and Cooperation (Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe), Conference on Disarmament in Stockholm, and Cultural Forum in Budapest and later Vienna. WikiPedia:Haiti Dmoz:Regional Caribbean Haiti Commons:Category:Haiti


Oslo

'''Fita Bayisa''' (Amharic: ፍታ ባይሳ; born December 15, 1972 in Ambo (Ambo (woreda))), Oromia Sports Reference Database - Fita Bayisa is an Ethiopian long-distance (Long-distance track event) runner (Running), most known for winning a bronze medal on the 5000 metres at the 1992 Summer Olympics (Athletics at the 1992 Summer Olympics). A year before he had won a silver medal at the World Championships in Tokyo (1991 World Championships in Athletics). Before the Olympic Games in Barcelona Bayisa had emerged as the favourite for 10,000 metres, as he had defeated a world-class field at the Bislett Games in Oslo in a time of 27:14.26 min. However, he failed to make an impact on the 10,000 m final, which was won by Khalid Skah. '''Bente Skari''', née '''Martinsen''', (born 10 September 1972 in Oslo) is a former cross country skier from Nittedal, Norway. She is one of the most successful cross country skiers ever. thumb Dornier 328 Dornier 328-110 (Image:City Star Airlines Dornier 328 (TF-CSB).jpg) City Star Airlines started operations on 28 March 2005 with one aircraft flying between Aberdeen, Scotland (Aberdeen Airport) and Oslo (Oslo Gardermoen Airport) in cooperation with and on the AOC of domestic airline Landsflug in Iceland. CSA's owners acquired a controlling share in Landsflug in 2005 ref name "FI" >


Kiev

Early life David Bronstein was born in Bila Tserkva, Ukraine, to a Jewish mother and father. Growing up in a poor family, he learned chess at age six from his grandfather. As a youth in Kiev, he was trained by the renowned International Master Alexander Konstantinopolsky. He finished second in the Kiev Championship when he was only 15, and achieved the Soviet Master title at age 16 for his second-place result in the 1940 Ukrainian Chess Championship, behind Isaac Boleslavsky, with whom he became close friends both on and off the chessboard. He would later go on to marry Boleslavsky's daughter, Tatiana, in 1984. *Khmelnytskyi Oblast: from the city Khmelnytskyi


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