Places Known For

small green


Fort Nelson, British Columbia

at Inga since 1997. The purpose of the channel is educational in nature and to prevent diploid (2N) rainbows from becoming spawnbound. Sucker (Catostomidae)s are far and away the most abundant fish in this lake. It is not the easiest spot to find, as only a small green sign indicates its whereabouts. * Dawson Creek - CJDC (CJDC (AM)), CJDC-TV * Fort Nelson (Fort Nelson, British Columbia) - CKRX (CKRX-FM) * Fort St. John (Fort St. John, British Columbia) - CKNL (CKNL-FM), CHRX-FM


Fort St. John, British Columbia

. It is a popular fishing destination, which is stocked annually with Rainbow trout. A spawning channel project has been underway at Inga since 1997. The purpose of the channel is educational in nature and to prevent diploid (2N) rainbows from becoming spawnbound. Sucker (Catostomidae)s are far and away the most abundant fish in this lake. It is not the easiest spot to find, as only a small green sign indicates its whereabouts. After returning to the Athabasca District in 1905, Constantine


Cuiabá

of stuffed dead animals—all rather tatty looking—and some great Indian clubs and arrows and headdresses. *Down by the renovated riverside port area there's the '''Museu do Rio Cuiabá''' and the '''Municipal Aquarium''', Av. Beira Rio s n (where the Av. 15 de Novembro crosses the river; tel; 065 623-1440. Tu-Su 9AM-6PM. Features displays and exhibits on the changing face of the river, and a small collection of local Pantanal fish. The centerpiece of Cuiabá is a small green square called '''Praça de


Ouagadougou

are ubiquitous and of much lower quality, but are much cheaper to use. As there are no meters, all fees for all taxis are negotiated in advance, and you should not enter a taxi until you and the driver have agreed upon a price. The small green taxi cabs should cost no more than XOF300 per person during the day for straight runs on main roads. Fees increase with distance or with departures from the main routes. Be prepared to share the cab with as many people as can be crammed in, or to pay


Marrakesh

. Gardens thumb left 300px Medina walls of Marrakesh (File:Medina walls of Marrakech (Dec. 2009).jpg) thumb right 300px Agdal Gardens (File:Marrakesh, devensive wall.jpg) The Menara gardens are located to the west of the city, at the gates of the Atlas mountains. They were built around 1130 by the Almohad ruler Abd al-Mu'min. The name ''menara'' derives from the pavilion with its small green pyramid roof (''menzeh''). The pavilion was built


A Coruña

Cristianos (Tenerife), Santander (Santander, Spain), Tarragona, Vigo, Motril, Almería, Seville, Castellón de la Plana, Alicante, Pasaia, Avilés, and Ferrol (Ferrol, Spain). *''Patatas bravas'' or ''papas bravas'' - fried potato dices (sometimes parboiled and then fried, or simply boiled) served with ''salsa brava'' a spicy tomato sauce, sometimes served also with mayo or aioli *''Pimientos de Padrón'' - small green peppers originally from Padrón


Tegucigalpa

isbn 978-99926-15-92-8 Other theories indicate it may derive from the term ''Togogalpa'' which refers to ''tototi'' (small green parrot, in Nahuatl) and ''Toncontín'', a small town near Tegucigalpa (toncotín was a Mexican dance of Nahuatl origin). WikiPedia:Tegucigalpa Dmoz:Regional Central_America Honduras Localities Tegucigalpa Commons:Category:Tegucigalpa


Tulsa, Oklahoma

has a current record of 31 wins with 21 knockouts, and three losses. 04 01 2008 align left 01 09 2006


Yerevan

Islamic Mosque, one of the extreme few surviving structures of once (before Soviet secularisation) prospering Muslim Community of Yerevan. * WikiPedia:Yerevan Commons:Category:Yerevan


Oman

: ريال‎, international currency code '''OMR'''). One rial is made up of one thousand ''baisa'' (also written ''baiza'', Arabic: بيسة). The Omani rial is officially tied to the US dollar at OMR1 USD2.6008 making it one of the largest units of currency in the whole world; exchange rates on the streets are a percentage point or two lower. Banknotes that currently circulate are in OMR0.100 (physically a rather small, green banknote and not to be confused with the OMR20 note), OMR0.500, 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 rial denominations. There are ATMs at the airport and plenty of them in Muscat and every main town, although not all of them take foreign cards. You can change foreign currency at the counters inside the airport and at money exchanges throughout Oman. Shopping The Omani national symbol is the silver-sheathed dagger known as the ''khanjar''. These vary widely in quality and cost, but almost every shop will stock several different models. Most of the modern ones are made by Indian or Pakistani craftsmen under Omani direction, while many are actually made in India or Pakistan. There is a large variety in quality, from the handles to the sheath. The best handles are made of silver-adorned sandalwood, while the lesser quality handles are made of resin. Look carefully at the sheath to determine the quality of the sliver work. A good quality ''khanjar'' can cost upwards of OMR700. Typically, those will come in a presentation box, and include a belt. Another reminder of the country's tribal past is the walking stick known as ''arsaa''. This is a cane with a concealed sword in it, which can prove quite a talking point at home. Unfortunately, in many countries, it will prove a talking point with customs officials rather than friends and family. In Musandam, the khanjar is frequently replaced by the Jerz as formal wear, a walking stick with a small axe head as the handle. Omani silver is also a popular souvenir, often made into rosewater shakers and small "Nizwa boxes" (named for the town from which they first came). Silver "message holders" (known as hurz, or herz), often referred to in souks as "old time fax machines" are often for sale as well. Many silver products will be stamped with "Oman" on them, which is a guarantee of authenticity. Only new silver items may be so stamped. There is a large quantity of 'old' silver available which will not be stamped. Although it may be authentic, stamping it would destroy its antique value. Caveat Emptor are the watch words. Stick to reputable shops if you are contemplating buying antique Omani silver of any sort. There is a wonderful selection of Omani silver available as jewellery as well. Items for sale in the Muttrah souk may not be genuine Omani items. Instead visit Shatti Al Qurm just outside of Muscat or the Nizwa Fort. The distinctive hats worn by Omani men, called "kuma", are also commonly sold, particularly in the Muttrah Souk in Muscat. Genuine kumas cost from OMR80. Frankincense is a popular purchase in the Dhofar region as the region has historically been a centre for production of this item. Myrrh can also be purchased quite cheaply in Oman. As one might expect, Oman also sells many perfumes made from a great number of traditional ingredients. Indeed, the most expensive perfume in the world (Amouage) is made in Oman from frankincense and other ingredients, and costs around OMR50. You can also find sandalwood myrrh and jasmine perfumes. Opening hours during the holy month of Ramadan are very restricted. Supermarkets are less strict, but don't rely on being able to buy anything after iftar. At noon, most shops are closed anyway but this is not specific to Ramadan. Using credit cards in shops is hit or miss. It is better to get cash at an ATM. Small denomination notes are hard to come by but necessary for bargaining. Unless you are in a supermarket, restaurant or mall bargaining is recommended, and this should be conducted politely. thumb right 300px Wahiba Sands (Image:Wahiba Sands2.jpg) Eat The food is mainly Arabic, Lebanese, Turkish, and Indian. Many Omanis make a distinction between "Arabic" food and "Omani" food, with the former being the description of the standard dishes found throughout the Arabian Peninsula. Omani food tends to be less spicy and served in quite large portions - whole fish are not uncommon at lunch in some local restaurants (sticking to local food, it is quite easy to eat a substantial meal for less than OR2). As benefits of a country with a long coastline, seafood is quite a common dish, particularly shark, which is surprisingly tasty. True traditional Omani food is hard to find in restaurants. Omani sweets are well-known throughout the region, with the most popular being "halwa". This is a hot, semi-solid substance which behaves a little like honey and is eaten with a spoon. The taste is similar to Turkish Delight. Omani dates are among the best in the world and can be found at every social place and at offices. American fast food chains, especially KFC, McDonalds, and Burger King, are not hard to find in the bigger cities, especially Muscat and Salalah. In Khaboora you can get Pakistani Porotta. They are double the size of Indian Porottas and look like pappadams. But they taste like porottas and are much thinner and delicious. Three porottas are available for the equivalent of Rs11. Traditional Omani Khubz (bread) is hard to find outside of an Omani home, but for an experience one should try hard not to miss. This traditional bread is made of flour, salt and water cooked over a fire (or gas stove) on a large metal plate. The bread is paper-thin and crispy. It is eaten with almost any Omani food, including hot milk or chai (tea) for breakfast-- "Omani cornflakes". In Sohar you may get an excellent lunch with Ayla curry, Ayla fry and Payarupperi. Expect to pay only OMR0.4 (Rs 44) which is considered very low lunch price here. Drink Bottled drinking (mineral) water is easily available at most stores. Tap water is generally safe; however, most Omanis drink bottled water and to be safe, you should too. Alcohol is available only in select restaurants and large hotels and is usually very expensive (ranging from OMR1.5 for a 500 mL Carlsberg to OMR4). Drinking alcohol in public is prohibited, but you can get your own drinks and enjoy at public areas but in privacy such as camping by beaches, sands, mountains, or actually in any remote areas. Only foreign residents can buy alcohol from alcohol shops and with certain limits. But an alcohol black market is widely spread around the cities and alcohol can be found easily. Foreigner travellers are allowed 2 litres of spirits as duty free baggage allowance. Travellers can pick up spirits at the duty free shop in the arrival lounge. During Ramadan, drinking anything in public is prohibited, even for foreigners. Take care to drink in the privacy of your room. Sleep Oman has the full spectrum of accommodation - from ultra-luxurious hotels to extremely rustic huts in the desert constructed from date palm leaves. In recent years, Oman has been attempting to turn itself into something of a five-star destination for well-heeled travellers. This does not pose a problem to the budget-minded in Muscat, and even outside of the capital there is still a range of budget options. In some parts of the country, however, accommodation may be limited to higher-end hotels and resorts. Work Working in Oman requires that you hold a residence permit. In common with other Gulf countries, you must be sponsored by an employer to obtain a residence permit. It's not uncommon for people to enter on a tourist visa then look for a job - this is fine. Penalties for the employer are substantial if they are caught employing illegals, although this naturally varies depending on how good their connections are. The majority of positions are filled by expats from the sub-continent. Positions for Europeans tend to be restricted to upper management levels or specialised occupations, so don't expect to pick up a position as you pass through unless you are prepared to work for very little! Cope Visitors may be interested in the monthly English language lifestyle magazine, Oman Today, which is widely available in Oman. Stay safe Homosexuality is a crime in Oman. LGBT tourists should be self-aware. Driving in Muscat can sometimes be a problem, although this is due more to congestion than bad driving on the part of the locals. Outside of the major cities, a common driving risk is falling asleep at the wheel due to the long stretches of featureless desert. Driving in Oman calls for attention to the unexpected. It has the second highest death rate from traffic accidents in the world (surpassed only by Saudi, followed closely by the UAE). Omani drivers outside of the cities tend to drive very fast and pass with impunity. Driving at night is especially hazardous as many drivers fail to turn their headlights on. Camels will walk into the road even if they see cars approaching, and collisions are often fatal for both camel and driver. Female travellers should be careful to dress modestly, as not to offend local customs. Visiting gambling and adult sites is also a crime in Oman. Internet censorship in Oman is very serious. So you need to be careful to stay safe on-line. Stay healthy Oman is warm year-round and summers can be extremely hot. Always carry drinking water with you and be wary of de-hydration in high temperatures. If you're not used to the heat it can sneak up on you and cause serious health problems. Several people have tried to cross stretches of the Omani desert on their own in a rented 4WD. Some of these people have died or got rescued just in time. Travelling through a desert requires proper preparation. It looks easy from a modern air-conditioned 4WD, but if that fails you are suddenly back to basics. Never go off-road alone. A minimum of two to three cars (of the same make) is the rule. Leave your itinerary with a friend with clear instructions if you do not return in time. Take at least: - recovery tools: spades, rope (and attachments), sand mats or ladders - two spare tires and all required equipment - a good air pump (high capacity) - sufficient water (at least 25 litres more than you think you will need for drinking) - sufficient petrol: there are no petrol stations in the middle of nowhere. If you have – or can get – a satellite phone, take it. (Mobiles work only in limited areas.) Check your car before embarking on such a trip. Respect As he has done more to develop the nation than any Arab leader, or most world leaders for that matter, in recent history, Sultan Qaboos is a figure who is held in the highest regard – even revered – by the vast majority of Omanis and foreigners. Visitors should refrain from making any comments or statements that could be construed as disrespectful. The Omanis are generally very humble and down-to-earth people. The usual rules of respect when travelling in a Muslim country should be followed in Oman, even when locals appear to be a little less "uptight" than their neighbours. Homosexuality is officially illegal due to Islamic law but is practised with discretion; however as elsewhere in the Gulf it is taboo to discuss such topics. While Omanis may not say anything to foreigners who dress in tight or revealing clothing, it is considered to be very disrespectful. Yes, some visitors push the goodwill of the Omanis in choosing their attire, but a little sensitivity goes a long way. A general rule of thumb is that women should always keep shoulders, knees, and midriff covered, and avoid tight or revealing clothing. For men, shorts should be worn only for outdoor activities; longer shorts (i.e. at or below the knee) are fine in the city. Staring is quite common in Oman; children, men and women are likely to stare at you simply for being a foreigner, especially if you travel off-season and in out-of-the-way places. This is not meant as an insult, it rather shows an interest, and a friendly smile will leave the kids giggling and showing off, and the adults happily trying out their few English phrases. Depending on which area of Oman you are in, smiling, though, may not be a good idea. In larger areas in which the locals have had excessive amounts of one on one experience with foreigners, smile-away. Outside of Muscat and Salalah, it's not advised to smile at anyone of the opposite sex regardless of how friendly they are (save for tour guides) due to the fact that nearly any interaction with the opposite gender (even holding doors open, picking up something that has fallen and handing it to the owner, eye contact, etc.) is viewed as flirtatious. It is especially important for Western women to take into account that an innocent smile saying, "I see you seeing me, do you need something" means "I'm interested, come closer" to most Omani men. They live in a heavily gender segregated society and so any chance they have to speak to the opposite gender is usually viewed as having at least semi-sexual overtones. Under Omani law, an Omani can be taken to court for insulting another person, whether it is calling them an insulting name (one of the more common Arabic insults of "donkey," "dog," "pig," "sheep," etc.) or worse. Omanis, although "humble" are extremely sensitive to anything they perceive as criticism whether personal, national, or anything they perceive as being directed at the Gulf. Although Saudi Arabia is usually a fair target for jokes in the Arab world (especially in the Levant), Omanis don't take well to it. What Westerners would usually consider hypersensitive is fairly normal in Oman and due largely to the fact that Omanis have grown up in an environment in which criticism and name-calling is more or less outlawed. This is especially important to know for those who come here to teach Omanis - unlike those from the Levant and parts of north Africa where teasing and intellectual "jousting" can be used as a form of building relationships or a sign of friendship, it doesn't work here and Omanis do not interpret it positively, save for those who have lived in the West or have worked with Westerners for extended periods of time. It might be said that teasing in general here, whether about accents, dress, food or anything else is just a bad idea. Connect The country code for Oman is '''968'''. Dialling out from Oman you will need to dial 00 + International Code + Number Dialling into Oman callers use +968 followed by an 8 digit number... These 8-digit numbers generally start with a ''9'' if it is mobile number, and with ''2'' for land lines, though other numbers will eventually start to get used. WikiPedia:Oman Dmoz:Regional Middle East Oman Commons:Category:Oman


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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017