Places Known For

singing called


Khakassia

, Chuvashia (Chuvash Republic), Khakassia, Tuva, Yakutia (Sakha Republic), the Altai Republic, Kabardino-Balkaria, and Karachayevo-Cherkessiya. Each of these subdivisions has its own flag, parliament, laws, and official state language (in addition to Russian (Russian language)). Altai and Khakassia Tuva’s neighbouring states, the Altai Republic to the west, and Khakassia to the northwest, have developed forms of throat singing called ‘’kai’’, or ‘’khai’’. In Altai, this is used mostly for epic poetry performance, to the accompaniment of topshur. Altai narrators ("kai-chi") perform in kargyraa, khöömei and sygyt styles, which are similar to Tuvan. They also have their own style, a very high harmonics, emerging from kargyraa. Variations of kai are called karkyra, sybysky, homei and sygyt. The first well-known kai-chi was Kalkin. - ABA UNAA Abakan Airport Abakan, Khakassia, Russia wikipedia:Khakassia


Altai Republic

paleogeography, age and origin. Altai and Khakassia Tuva’s neighbouring states, the Altai Republic to the west, and Khakassia to the northwest, have developed forms of throat singing called ‘’kai’’, or ‘’khai’’. In Altai, this is used mostly for epic poetry performance, to the accompaniment of topshur. Altai narrators ("kai-chi") perform in kargyraa, khöömei and sygyt styles, which are similar to Tuvan. They also have their own style, a very high harmonics, emerging from kargyraa. Variations of kai are called karkyra, sybysky, homei and sygyt. The first well-known kai-chi was Kalkin. '''Kemerovo Oblast''' ( wikipedia:Altai Republic Commons:Category:Altai Republic


Bashkortostan

as they were. As such, differences between Tatars and Keräşen Tatars now is only that Keräşens have Russian names. Bashkortostan The Bashkirs of Bashkortostan have a style of overtone singing called ''özläü'' (sometimes spelled ''uzlyau''; Bashkort (Bashkir language) '''Өзләү'''), which nearly died out. In addition, Bashkorts also sing uzlyau while playing the kurai (Kurai (flute)), a national instrument. This technique of vocalizing into a flute can also be found in folk


Douala

Douala, Cameroon * Muscat (Muscat, Oman), Oman The pirogue sailors of Douala are known for a kind of singing called ngoso, which has evolved into a kind of modern music accompanied by zanza (zanza (instrument)), balafon and various percussion instruments. thumb right upright Bamileke (Image:TamTam.jpg) drummers in Cameroon's


South Africa

have a low, rhythmic style of throat-singing called ''eefing'' that is often accompanied by call-and-response vocals. Smithsonian Global Sound – Throat Singing Retrieved on 2009-03-13. * South African swimmer Natalie du Toit created history. As well as winning her events in the newly-included disabled swimming event, the 18-year-old, missing the lower section of her left leg, made the final of the 800 metre able-bodied freestyle event in one of a small number of disabled sporting events integrated into the games. WikiPedia:South Africa Dmoz:Regional Africa South Africa Commons:Category:South Africa


Japan

, in 1913. India and Japan banned them in 1919, and China banned them in 1925. thumb New York Times report dated 29 January 1911 (File:MatchPatentNYT.png) National Institute for Infectious Diseases Japan, Kantō (Kantō region), Tokyo 3 (4) Institute of Physical and Chemical Research Japan, Kantō (Kantō region), Tsukuba (4) Hokkaido The Ainu (Ainu people) of Hokkaidō, Japan, once practiced a type of throat singing called rekuhkara


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Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017