Places Known For

science art


Federal Emergency Relief Administration

of the Columbia Historical Society year 1980 volume 50 page 527 In 1935, Congress (United States Congress) held hearings (congressional hearing) on plans to establish a new Department of Science, Art and Literature and to build a monumental theater and arts building on Capitol Hill (Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C.) near the Supreme Court (United States Supreme Court) building. A small auditorium was added at the Library of Congress, but it had restrictions on its use


Province of Saxony

20,700 square kilometres, divided into thirteen rural districts (Kreis in Prussia), named after their capitals: Thomas Curtis (1839). ''The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art, literature, and practical mechanics, by the orig. ed. of the Encyclopaedia metropolitana'' Volume XVIII, p. 11 The Bishopric of Halberstadt was likewise mediatised (German Mediatisation) in 1803, and according to the Final Act of the 1815 Vienna Congress (Congress of Vienna), the Oker was the eastern border of the Kingdom of Hanover with the Duchy of Brunswick and the Prussian Province of Saxony. When the Kingdom of Prussia annexed Hanover in 1866, it became the inner Prussian border between the provinces of Hanover (Province of Hanover) and Saxony (Province of Saxony) as well as the border, north of Börßum to Ohrum between the Province of Hanover in the west and the Duchy of Brunswick in the east. From 1945 to 1990 the Inner German border between East (East Germany) and West Germany ran down the centre of the Oker between Wiedelah and Schladen, today between the German states (States of Germany) of Saxony-Anhalt and Lower Saxony. The Bishopric of Halberstadt was likewise mediatised (German Mediatisation) in 1803, and according to the Final Act of the 1815 Vienna Congress (Congress of Vienna), the Oker was the eastern border of the Kingdom of Hanover with the Duchy of Brunswick and the Prussian Province of Saxony. When the Kingdom of Prussia annexed Hanover in 1866, it became the inner Prussian border between the provinces of Hanover (Province of Hanover) and Saxony (Province of Saxony) as well as the border, north of Börßum to Ohrum between the Province of Hanover in the west and the Duchy of Brunswick in the east. From 1945 to 1990 the Inner German border between East (East Germany) and West Germany ran down the centre of the Oker between Wiedelah and Schladen, today between the German states (States of Germany) of Saxony-Anhalt and Lower Saxony. Life and work Dorn was born in Guttstadt (Dobre Miasto) (Dobre Miasto), Province of Prussia, and died in Halle (Halle, Saxony-Anhalt), Province of Saxony. He was educated at Königsberg and went on to teach at the university level. In 1885, at Halle University, Dorn took over the position of personal ''ordinarius'' professor for theoretical physics from Anton Oberbeck. Since Dorn was already an ''ordinarius'' professor, The position of ''ordinarius'' professor outranks that of ''extraordinarius'' professor, which is comparable to that of associate professor. he was allowed to assume the title so as to not appear as having been demoted. Jungnickel and McCormmach, 1990b: p. 37 In 1895, Dorn succeeded Hermann Knoblauch at Halle as the ''ordinarius'' professor for experimental physics In Germany, until the early twentieth century, experimental physics had priority over theoretical physics, and therefore such positions were considered to be higher in rank. This changed with the rise of German theoretical physics in the early twentieth century, especially through the activities of Max Born at the University of Göttingen and Arnold Sommerfeld at the University of Munich, who adroitly used experimental physics to test and develop their theories. and director of the physics institute. Dorn’s previous duties were assumed by Karl Schmidt, who had been a Privatdozent and was called as an ''extraordinarius'' professor for theoretical physics. Jungnickel and McCormmach, 1990b: p. 293 The Duchy of Brunswick (deriving from Brunswick-Lüneburg (Brunswick-Lueneburg)) created administrative districts (''Kreise'') in 1833; the District of Helmstedt was one of those districts. It was subdivided into the Ämter (Amt (political division)) of Calvörde (Calvörde (Amt)), Königslutter (Königslutter (Amt)), Helmstedt (Helmstedt (Amt)), Schöningen (Schöningen (Amt)), and Vorsfelde (Vorsfelde (Amt)). In 1944, the Amt of Calvörde, which formed an exclave, was moved to the District of Haldensleben (Haldensleben (district)), Province of Saxony. During the administrative reforms of the 1970s, northern areas of the district were moved to the District of Gifhorn (Gifhorn (district)) and to the City of Wolfsburg; the district gained areas in the west from the District of Gifhorn and the District of Brunswick (Brunswick (district)) (see List of territorial changes to the District of Helmstedt). Early life Born in Aschersleben in the Province of Saxony into an aristocratic Prussian family, von Rundstedt joined the German Army in 1892, then entered Germany′s elite military academy (Military academy#Germany) in 1902 – an institution that accepted only 160 new students annually and weeded out 75% of the students through exams. During World War I, he rose in rank until 1918 when he was a major and was chief of staff of his division (division (military)). The city from 1247 began developing as a reestablishment from the old part of the town. In 1701 it became part of the Kingdom of Prussia. In 1713, the two towns Altstadt and Neustadt became one. Salzwedel became part of the Prussian Province of Saxony in 1815 after the Napoleonic Wars. In 1870 it received a railroad connection. The medieval part of the town remains the commercial and administrative center of the town until today. The Altmark remained with the Brandenburg margraviate, since 1415 held by the House of Hohenzollern, and thereby became part of rising Brandenburg-Prussia and of the Kingdom of Prussia upon its creation in 1701. After Prussia's defeat at the hands of Napoleon (Napoleon I of France) in 1806, the territory was lost under the terms of the Treaty of Tilsit and included within the new Kingdom of Westphalia. It was restored upon Napoleon's defeat under Article XXIII of the Final Act of the Congress of Vienna, however the separation from Brandenburg lasted, as the Altmark then was attached the new Prussian Province of Saxony in 1815. Within Prussian Saxony, the Altmark was subdivided into the districts of Salzwedel, Gardelegen, Osterburg, and Stendal, all administered within the ''Regierungsbezirk'' of Magdeburg (Magdeburg (region)). thumb left Parish church (File:Bismark Kirche.jpg) In the early 12th century the area then under the rule of Albert the Bear was settled with peasants descending from the Low Countries. The town's name is derived from the nearby Biese creek (after ), in the nine pre-1866 political provinces of Prussia, to wit in the Province of East Prussia (homonymous ecclesiastical province), in Berlin, which had become a separate Prussian administrative unit in 1881, and the Province of Brandenburg (''Ecclesiastical Province of the March of Brandenburg'' for both), in the Province of Pomerania (Province of Pomerania (1815–1945)) (homonymous), in the Province of Posen (homonymous), in the Rhine Province and since 1899 in the Province of Hohenzollern (''Ecclesiastical Province of the Rhineland''), in the Province of Saxony (homonymous), in the Province of Silesia (homonymous), in the Province of Westphalia (homonymous), and in the Province of West Prussia (homonymous). Every ecclesiastical province had a provincial synod (representing the provincial parishioners and clergy The ''March of Brandenburg'' provincial synod convened for the first time in autumn 1844, presided by Daniel Neander. ), and one consistory (or more), led by general superintendents (Superintendent (ecclesiastical)) (Gen.-Supt.). The ecclesiastical provinces of Saxony, Silesia and Pomerania had two, that of the ''March of Brandenburg'', three – from 1911 to 1933 even four – general superintendents, annually alternating in the leadership of the respective consistory. Life Launicke was born in Roßleben in the Province of Saxony and began by doing building work. In 1923, he joined the Communist Youth League of Germany (''Kommunistischer Jugendverband Deutschlands''; KJVD) and the Workers' Sporting Association (''Arbeitersportverein''). In 1927, he became a member of the Communist Party of Germany (KPD). He also became active in the ''Rotfrontkämpferbund''. Life Born in Magdeburg in the Prussian (Kingdom of Prussia) province of Saxony (Province of Saxony), Seldte was the son of an owner of a factory producing chemical products and soda water. He attended the Wilhelm-Raabe-Gymnasium (Gymnasium (school)) in Magdeburg and, after an apprenticeship as a salesman, he studied chemistry at the universities of Braunschweig (Braunschweig University of Technology) and Greifswald (University of Greifswald). In 1908 he took over the business of his early deceased father. Origins It originated in the Province of Saxony, in 1841. The members were also called '''Protestant Friends'''. The immediate occasion was an attempt to discipline a Magdeburg preacher who had expressed heretical views. Early leaders in the movement were Leberecht Uhlich and Gustav Adolf Wislicenus, both of whom were forced out of the Evangelical Church (Evangelical Church in Germany) for expressing liberal views. In like manner, independent congregations arose in a number of places. In 1847, a union was effected between them on the basis of a simple profession of faith in God and called '''Free Congregations''' (Ger. ''freie Gemeinden''). By this time their gatherings, held symbolically in the open air, had come to number more than two thousand, including delegates from England and America (United States). Eggeling was born in Blankenburg am Harz, Province of Saxony. A farmer's son, Eggeling went to the ''Bürgerschule'' (a kind of vocational school once found in some parts of Germany) and the Gymnasium (Gymnasium (school)) in Blankenburg, and between 1898 and 1904 completed officer training at the cadet schools at Oranienstein and Groß-Lichterfelde. The Diet of Gelnhausen is of much importance in the history of Germany. The Emperor Frederick executed here a great legal act. Yet the splitting up of the extensive country of the Saxons into a large number of principalities subject only to the imperial government was one of the causes of the system of petty states which proved so disadvantageous to Germany in its later history. The territory of the old duchy never again bore the name of Saxony; the large western part acquired the name of Westphalia. However, as regards customs and peculiarities of speech, the designation Lower Saxony (Lower Saxon Circle) was still in existence for the districts on the lower Elbe, that is, the northern part of the Province of Saxony, Hanover, Hamburg, etc., in distinction from Upper Saxony (Upper Saxon Circle), that is, the Kingdom of Saxony, and Thuringia. From the era of the conversion of the Saxons up to the revolt of the sixteenth century, a rich religious life was developed in the territory included in the medieval Duchy of Saxony. Art, learning, poetry, and the writing of history reached a high degree of perfection in the many monasteries. Among the most noted places of learning were the cathedral and monastery schools of Corvey, Hildesheim, Paderborn, and Münster. This era produced architecturally fine churches of the Romanesque style that are still in existence, as the cathedrals of Goslar, Soest (Soest, Germany), and Brunswick (Braunschweig), the chapel of St. Bartholomew at Paderborn, the collegiate churches at Quedlinburg, Königslutter, Gernrode, etc. Hildesheim, which contains much Romanesque work, has especially fine churches of this style. The cathedrals at Naumburg, Paderborn, Münster, and Osnabrück are striking examples of the Transition period. Only a few of these buildings still belong to the Catholic Church. thumb Heinrich Albert. (File:Bundesarchiv Bild 102-13486, Heinrich F. Albert.jpg) '''Heinrich Friedrich Albert''' (February 12, 1874, Magdeburg, Province of Saxony – November 1, 1960) was a German lawyer who served as commercial attaché to the Imperial German Ambassador to the United States Johann Heinrich von Bernstorff during World War I. He was also the paymaster for German espionage and sabotage operations in the United States. In addition, he also arranged for forged passorts and documents for German-Americans who wanted to return to fight for the German armed forces.


Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. His works in that building include allegorical medallions representing ''Science'', ''Art'', ''Justice'', and ''Religion'' in the Capitol Rotunda, large lunette murals underneath the Capitol dome, and a number of works in the House Chamber. Unfortunately, Abbey became ill with cancer in 1911 slowing his work. At the time, he was working on the "Reading of the Declaration of Independence Mural" which was later installed in the House Chamber. Abbey was so ill, that his studio assistant, Ernest Board completed the work with little supervision from Abbey. Later in 1911, Abbey died, leaving his commission for the State Capitol of Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania State Capitol) unfinished. John Singer Sargent, a friend and neighbor of Abbey, and studio assistant Board completed the "Reading of the Declaration of Independence Mural." Abbey's works were installed in the Rotunda and House Chamber. Two rooms from Abbey's commission were left undone, and the remainder of the commission was given to Violet Oakley. Oakley completed the works from start to finish using her own designs. That same day, the nine-car funeral train bearing Lincoln's body departed Washington on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, arriving at Baltimore's Camden Station at 10 a.m., the first stop on a 13-day journey to Springfield, Illinois, its final destination. Goodrich, p. 195. Civil War When the Civil War started in 1861, McConaughy formed and served as captain of the "Adams Rifles," a company of civilian scouts, primarily composed of his law clients. They were active in monitoring the region for signs of Confederate (Confederate States Army) activity during several threatened incursions, including during the Maryland Campaign. McConaughy's scouts and spies were particularly active in late June 1863 during the early days of the Gettysburg Campaign, when they shadowed oncoming enemy cavalry and, later, the main infantry columns. McConaughy gave this vital information to the local military commander, Maj. (Major (United States)) Granville O. Haller, who in turn relayed it to Maj. Gen. (Major general (United States)) Darius N. Couch and Governor Andrew Curtin in Harrisburg (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania). McConaughy stayed in Gettysburg during the Confederate occupation in early July, still rendering service to the Federal soldiers. Following the battle, Col. George H. Sharpe wrote a letter to McConaughy on behalf of Maj. Gen. George G. Meade, formally thanking him for the critical information on Confederate troop movements.


Turku

as enjoy watching the wild boars. The Old Town Hall hosts events for science, art and fashion. The whole family can enjoy the medieval amusement. *


Puerto Rico

and the courses taught were Latin language, literature, history, science, art, philosophy and theology. Nicolas Kanellos, "Hispanic Firsts", Visible Ink Press (ISBN 0-7876-0519-0), p. 40. Education in Puerto Rico is divided in three levels—Primary (elementary school grades 1–6), Secondary (intermediate and high school grades 7–12), and Higher Level (undergraduate and graduate studies). As of 2002, the literacy rate of the Puerto Rican population was 94.1%; by gender, it was 93.9% for males and 94.4% for females. Commons:Category:Puerto Rico WikiPedia:Puerto Rico Dmoz:Regional Caribbean Puerto Rico


Peru

and garden designers. Willy Lange was perhaps the first such designer interested in establishing a scientific basis for plant selection. For Lange, it was only logical that ''“those who support the laws of nature are the better people.”'' His design concept revolved around science, art, and race (Race (classification of human beings)); the garden became ''“the racial expression of the understanding of nature of ‘Nordic’ or ‘Germanic’ people.”'' Later designers, particularly Alwin


Berlin

covered an area of about 20,700 square kilometres, divided into thirteen rural districts (Kreis in Prussia), named after their capitals: Thomas Curtis (1839). ''The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of science, art, literature, and practical mechanics, by the orig. ed. of the Encyclopaedia metropolitana'' Volume XVIII, p. 11 Potsdam in the 20th century Berlin was the official capital of Prussia and later of the German Empire, but the court remained in Potsdam, where many government officials settled. In 1914, the Emperor Wilhelm II (Wilhelm II of Germany) signed the Declaration of War in the Neues Palais. The city lost its status as a second capital in 1918, when Wilhelm II (Wilhelm II of Germany) abdicated at the end of World War I. Transport *'''Rail transport''': Potsdam, included in the fare zone "C" (''Tarifbereich C'') Commons:Category:Berlin Wikipedia:Berlin Dmoz:Regional Europe Germany States Berlin


Netherlands

in Sweden and the Netherlands. They have played an important role in Swedish and Dutch history since the early 17th century, mainly centered around the iron foundry company town Finspång, but often extending to science, art and national politics. The family retained its contacts with the Netherlands even after the main branch settled in Sweden. Some of them hold the title count or baron. Both branches are still in existence and continue to thrive. Nu Shooz originally released


India

of the village of Bhaddu (Bhaddu village) and located uphill from the Bhini bridge on the river Bhini (Bhini River). The Doulton Fountain, gifted to Glasgow as part of the International Exhibition of 1888 (International Exhibition of Science, Art and Industry), was moved to the Green in 1890. Designed by architect Arthur E. Pearce, the 48 ft tall fountain was built by the Royal Doulton company to commemorate Victoria of the United


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