Places Known For

role quot


Saint Helena

countries country_profile.cfm?cid sh&type short&lng en Saint Helena Whilst in India, the British Army nominally re-classified the 17th as lancers, Fortescue (1895), p. 121 and added "lancers" as a subtitle to its regimental designation in 1822. The 17th did not learn of its new status until 1823, when, during a stopover at Saint Helena on its journey back to Britain, a copy

of the Army List (British Army List) was obtained. Although the weapon's use had endured in parts of continental Europe, Featherstone, Donald F. (1978), ''Weapons and Equipment of the Victorian Soldier'', p. 53 the lance had not been in British employ for more than a century. Adjutant General's Office (1841), ''Historical records of the British Army'', Issue 9, p. 50 Its reintroduction by the Prince Frederick, Duke of York


Comoros

; To put this in a layperson's terms: The official exchange rate of the Comoros franc is 491.97 francs to the euro. It will remain at 491.97 until the government or central bank changes its mind. If Comoros were to float its currency, it could go up to 200 per euro or down to 49,000 per euro or whatever. -- Mwalcoff (User:Mwalcoff) 04:33, 15 February 2006 (UTC) According to the US conservative review ''National Interest'', Jacques Foccart played "an essential role" in the negotiation of the Cooperation accords with the newly independent African states, former members of the French Community created in 1958. These accords involved the sectors of finance and economy, culture and education, and the military. There were initially eleven countries involved: Mauritania, Senegal, Cote d'Ivoire, Dahomey (now Benin), Upper Volta (Republic of Upper Volta) (now Burkina Faso), Niger, Chad, Gabon, Central African Republic, Congo-Brazzaville, and Madagascar. Togo and Cameroon, former UN Trust Territories, as well as, later on, Mali and the former Belgian territories (Ruanda-Urundi, now Rwanda and Burundi, and Congo-Kinshasa), together with some of the ex-Portuguese territories (Portuguese Colonial War), and Comoros and Djibouti, which had also been under French rule for many years but became independent in the 1970s, were also later included. Accidents and incidents * On June 30, 2009, Yemenia Flight 626, an Airbus A310 Yemeni plane crashes with 150 aboard , flight number IY626, departed from Sana'a International Airport, en route to Prince Said Ibrahim International Airport in Moroni (Moroni, Comoros), Comoros. Reportedly with 11 crew and 142 passengers aboard, including 66 French nationals, the aircraft crashed into the Indian Ocean on approach to the destination airport. A twelve-year-old girl (Bahia Bakari) was the only survivor. - Comoros Commons:Category:Comoros WikiPedia:Comoros Dmoz:Regional Africa Comoros


Cameroon

Commons:Category:Cameroon WikiPedia:Cameroon Dmoz:Regional Africa Cameroon


Burkina Faso

2007 first Tábita last Hünmeier coauthors Cláudia Carvalho, Andrea Rita Marrero, Francisco Mauro Salzano, Sérgio Danilo Junho Pena, Maria Cátira Bortolini volume 133 issue 2 pages 854–867 pmid 17427922 doi 10.1002 ajpa.20604 The place of origin and age is unreported. According to the US conservative review ''National Interest'', Jacques Foccart played "an essential role" in the negotiation of the Cooperation accords with the newly independent African states, former members of the French Community created in 1958. These accords involved the sectors of finance and economy, culture and education, and the military. There were initially eleven countries involved: Mauritania, Senegal, Cote d'Ivoire, Dahomey (now Benin), Upper Volta (Republic of Upper Volta) (now Burkina Faso), Niger, Chad, Gabon, Central African Republic, Congo-Brazzaville, and Madagascar. Togo and Cameroon, former UN Trust Territories, as well as, later on, Mali and the former Belgian territories (Ruanda-Urundi, now Rwanda and Burundi, and Congo-Kinshasa), together with some of the ex-Portuguese territories (Portuguese Colonial War), and Comoros and Djibouti, which had also been under French rule for many years but became independent in the 1970s, were also later included. thumb Grand Mosque in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso (Image:BoboDioulasso-GrandMosqueE.JPG) '''Islam''' in '''Burkina Faso''' (Upper Volta (Republic of Upper Volta)) has a long and varied history. According to the 2006 census, the population of the country is 60.53 percent Muslim. “Les principaux tableaux du recensement general de la population et de l'habitation 2006,” Institut National de la Statistique et de la Démographie, Ministère de l'économie et des finances, July 2008. In 1987, Upper Volta was renamed Burkina Faso. After a succession of military coups, a constitutional republic was established in 1991. In Burkina Faso the Arabist and Islamist movement is viewed a counter-culture to the European style of modernity, and also a way of integrating the disparate ethnic groups which make up the Muslim population of the country. Madrasa education, which began just after World War II, now serves half of the Muslim population, though only tiny minorities reach the secondary level. Islam is also strengthened by the construction of mosques, preaching on national television, official recognition of Muslim festivals, and support from the Arab world. Madrasa education appeals to the lower middle classes, excluded from political power, who favor a state based on sharia. The Islamic movements, however, are divided into numerous factions.


Mauritania

Commons:Category:Mauritania WikiPedia:Mauritania Dmoz:Regional Africa Mauritania


Benin

;Called "Wairak" and misidentified as Bantu in Luis ''et al.'' (2004). South African Khoisan, Sudan, and Senegal, as well as small frequencies in samples obtained from Qatar, Oman, Ethiopian Oromo (Oromo people), and Somali (Somali people) immigrants to Denmark. According to the US conservative review ''National Interest'', Jacques Foccart played "an essential role" in the negotiation of the Cooperation accords with the newly independent African states, former members of the French Community created in 1958. These accords involved the sectors of finance and economy, culture and education, and the military. There were initially eleven countries involved: Mauritania, Senegal, Cote d'Ivoire, Dahomey (now Benin), Upper Volta (Republic of Upper Volta) (now Burkina Faso), Niger, Chad, Gabon, Central African Republic, Congo-Brazzaville, and Madagascar. Togo and Cameroon, former UN Trust Territories, as well as, later on, Mali and the former Belgian territories (Ruanda-Urundi, now Rwanda and Burundi, and Congo-Kinshasa), together with some of the ex-Portuguese territories (Portuguese Colonial War), and Comoros and Djibouti, which had also been under French rule for many years but became independent in the 1970s, were also later included. * The 2006 National People's Congress opens in Beijing, beginning a 10-day session of China's parliament. Premier Wen Jiabao makes a Working Report and vows for support for the poor. (CNN) (People's Daily) * Benin presidential election, 2006: Voters in Benin go to the polls to decide who will succeed Mathieu Kérékou as President (List of Presidents of Benin). Results are expected to be announced by Wednesday. If no single candidate of the 26 wins an outright majority, a runoff election will take place in two weeks. (Scotsman), (VOA), (Reuters) * Tens of thousands of protesters in Bangkok demand the resignation of Prime Minister (List of Prime Ministers of Thailand) Thaksin Shinawatra of Thailand. (BBC), (Reuters), (CNN) '''Cotonou Cadjehoun Airport'''


Gabon

: Carroll & Graf, 2005; ISBN 0-7867-1551-0), by Joseph C. Wilson, IV (Joseph C. Wilson), Ambassador to Gabon and São Tomé and Príncipe, 1992–1995 According to the US conservative review ''National Interest'', Jacques Foccart played "an essential role" in the negotiation of the Cooperation accords with the newly independent African states, former members of the French Community created in 1958. These accords involved the sectors of finance and economy, culture and education, and the military. There were initially eleven countries involved: Mauritania, Senegal, Cote d'Ivoire, Dahomey (now Benin), Upper Volta (Republic of Upper Volta) (now Burkina Faso), Niger, Chad, Gabon, Central African Republic, Congo-Brazzaville, and Madagascar. Togo and Cameroon, former UN Trust Territories, as well as, later on, Mali and the former Belgian territories (Ruanda-Urundi, now Rwanda and Burundi, and Congo-Kinshasa), together with some of the ex-Portuguese territories (Portuguese Colonial War), and Comoros and Djibouti, which had also been under French rule for many years but became independent in the 1970s, were also later included. * Five leaders of the Lord's Resistance Army, a rebel group begun in Uganda, are targeted by the first arrest warrants to be issued by the International Criminal Court. (BBC) * Gabon announces that the presidential elections are to be held on 27 November with security forces voting two days earlier, but opposition denounces the move as a ruse for ballot rigging. (allAfrica) * Zimbabwe is facing increasing threat of military revolt, as soldiers are increasingly dissatisfied by the government's failure to increase their salaries and by chronic food shortages at their barracks. (allAfrica) '''Peter's Duiker''' (''Cephalophus callipygus''), is a small antelope found in Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, southern Cameroon and northern Republic of Congo. Commons:Category:Gabon WikiPedia:Gabon Dmoz:Regional Africa Gabon


Central African Republic

Commons:Category:Central African Republic WikiPedia:Central African Republic Dmoz:Regional Africa Central African Republic


The Bronx

Sävsjö town in the little village of Komstad. DATE OF BIRTH August 27, 1972 PLACE OF BIRTH The Bronx, New York DATE OF DEATH Attanasio was born on September 28, 1957 in The Bronx, New York and grew up in Tenafly, New Jersey, where he attended high school. Walker, Don. "Brewers' owner Attanasio ready for his rookie season: Long love of game, business experience have prepared him for new role", '' Milwaukee


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