Places Known For

quot historical


Imus

, and after they left a few natives scrounged the place for articles left behind. They found a number of centimo coins and went away exclaiming in utter delight, "Centimos! Centimos!". The place has since been identified as Imus. Still, another legend is that of a young mother crooning her child to sleep with a plaintive Tagalog ditty called "limos." A group of Spanish soldiers, who had gone there for the first time, asked her name

of the place, and the woman, thinking that they were asking her the name of the song, answered "Limos". The Spaniards went away muttering the last syllable "imus". "About Imus - Historical Background". Imus Official Website. Retrieved on 2012-08-08. Etymology of barangay names Equally interesting are the legends of the origins of some barangay (barrio) names of Imus


Kolomna

. Water Kolomna is situated on three rivers, and has passenger and transport berths. Most known one is the Bochmanovo ( wikipedia:Kolomna commons:Category:Kolomna


Erdenet

WikiPedia:Erdenet Commons:Category:Erdenet


Podolsk

, Yegoryevsk, Zarayzk and Zvenigorod. The national register of "historical towns", first established in 1970, has been expanded to 478 settlements in 2002 - ''Decree of the government of Russian Federation of November 26, 2001 no. 815 "Federal target program on preservation and development of historical towns for 2002–2010" (Постановление Правительства РФ от 26 ноября 2001 г N 815 "О федеральной целевой программе «Сохранение и развитие архитектуры исторических городов


Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec

of the Seven Years War in 1754, when most joined and merged into the Abenaki tribes at Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec or moved further west. Spady, James O'Neil. "As if in a Great Darkness: Native American Refugees of the Middle Connecticut River Valley in the Aftermath of King Phillip's War: 1677-1697," ''Historical Journal of Massachusetts'', Vol. 23, no. 2 (Summer, 1995), 183-197. Small bands remained in Massachusetts as late as the 19th century, but most fled north or lost their tribal identity through intermarriage with other tribes and settlers. Many of the present-day Abenaki of New Hampshire, Vermont, and Canada are of part-Pocumtuck ancestry. This failure did not deter Hazen from offering a new route for invading Canada. This route went from Newbury, where Hazen owned land and knew the area, to Saint Francis, Quebec (Saint-François-du-Lac, Quebec). On July 12, Hazen departed Newbury to scout the route. By July 25, he had returned to White Plains; the effort was abandoned for the time being because the manpower was needed in the New York area. Plans for possible attacks against Quebec based on routes departing from the Newbury area were again contemplated in the fall of 1778, but Washington continued to resist the idea. Everest (#Everest), pp. 60–61


Platteville, Wisconsin

Farmland (Farmland (farming)) is prevalent in the Western Upland anywhere where the slope of the land is gradual enough to permit it, generally on the ridge tops and the valley bottoms. Both fields and pastureland are common in the region. The hillsides and narrow ravines that are unsuitable for agriculture are covered in forests. Oak, hickory, maple, and birch trees dominate the woodlands of the Western Upland. Several small cities (city) are scattered along the ridges and valleys. With a population of 59,498, the largest city in the Western Upland is Janesville (Janesville, Wisconsin) in the extreme southeast corner of the region. La Crosse (La Crosse, Wisconsin), with a population of 51,818, occupies a more central position along the Mississippi River. Other principal cities include Beloit (Beloit, Wisconsin), Monroe (Monroe, Wisconsin), Platteville (Platteville, Wisconsin), and Sparta (Sparta, Wisconsin). The resolution of these Indian conflicts opened the way for Wisconsin's settlement. Many of the region's first settlers were drawn by the prospect of lead mining in southwest Wisconsin. This area had traditionally


Buttevant

February 1499), "Betomam" (12 March 1499), and "Buttomam" (15 January 1500). Edmund Spencer, in ''Colin Clouts Come Home Againe'' (1595), gives an early example of the modern name and associates it with ''Mullagh'', his name for the river Awbeg: "Historical and Topographical Notes, Etc. on Buttevant, Castletownroche, Doneraile, Mallow", 1905 :"


Volokolamsk

. Other historical towns of Moscow Oblast are Balashikha, Chekhov (Chekhov, Moscow Oblast), Dmitrov, Istra, Kashira, Klin, Kolomna, Mozhaysk, Noginsk, Ozyory, Orekhovo-Zuyevo, Pavlovsky Posad, Podolsk, Ruza, Sergiev Posad, Serpukhov, Vereya, Volokolamsk, Yegoryevsk, Zarayzk and Zvenigorod. The national register of "historical towns", first established in 1970, has been


Serpukhov

Posad , Serpukhov, Vereya, Volokolamsk, Yegoryevsk, Zarayzk and Zvenigorod. The national register of "historical towns", first established in 1970, has been expanded to 478 settlements in 2002 - ''Decree of the government of Russian Federation of November 26, 2001 no. 815 "Federal target program on preservation and development of historical towns for 2002–2010" (Постановление Правительства РФ от 26 ноября 2001 г N 815 "О федеральной целевой программе


Bronnitsy

, Orekhovo-Zuyevo, Pavlovsky Posad, Podolsk, Ruza (Ruza, Ruzsky District, Moscow Oblast), Sergiev Posad, Serpukhov, Vereya, Volokolamsk, Yegoryevsk, Zarayzk and Zvenigorod. The national register of "historical towns", first established in 1970, has been expanded to 478 settlements in 2002 - ''Decree of the government of Russian Federation of November 26, 2001 no. 815 "Federal target program on preservation and development of historical towns


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