Places Known For

promoting public


Santa Cruz, Rio de Janeiro

adapted to the functions of space real - Royal Palace of Santa Cruz. Feeling comfortable in the Royal Treasury of Santa Cruz, the Prince Regent prolonged his stay for several months, shipping, promoting public hearings and approvals from the same. It grew up and were educated princes Don Pedro (Pedro II of Brazil) and Dom Miguel (Miguel I of Portugal). '''Sepetiba''' is a neighborhood in the western zone of Rio de Janeiro, surrounded by Santa Cruz (Santa Cruz, Rio de Janeiro) and Guaratiba, and by the Sepetiba Bay. It occupies an area of 1,162.13 ha, and has a population of 35,892 (according to Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística, IBGE, 2000 demographic census).


Federal Housing Administration

of Reagan's Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Samuel Pierce and the neglect of the president were obstacles from the start, and Kemp was unsuccessful at either of his major initiatives: enacting enterprise zones and promoting public housing tenant ownership. The goal of these two plans was to change public housing into tenant-owned residences and to lure industry and business into inner cities with federal incentives.


French colonial empire

around anti-imperialism, with his government eschewing all foreign aid, pushing for odious debt reduction, nationalizing all land and mineral wealth, and averting the power and influence of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank. His domestic policies were focused on preventing famine with agrarian self-sufficiency and land reform, prioritizing education with a nation-wide literacy campaign, and promoting public health by vaccinating 2.5 million children against meningitis, yellow fever and measles. Commemorating Thomas Sankara by Farid Omar, ''Group for Research and Initiative for the Liberation of Africa'' (GRILA), November 28, 2007 Other components of his national agenda included planting over ten million trees to halt the growing desertification of the Sahel, doubling wheat production by redistributing land from feudal landlords (feudalism) to peasants, suspending rural poll taxes and domestic rents, and establishing an ambitious road and rail construction program to "tie the nation together." On the localized level Sankara also called on every village to build a medical dispensary and had over 350 communities construct schools with their own labour. Moreover, his commitment to women's rights led him to outlaw female genital mutilation, forced marriages and polygamy; while appointing females to high governmental positions and encouraging them to work outside the home and stay in school even if pregnant. thumb left Jules Ferry, by Nadar (artist) Nadar (Image:Jules Ferry Nadar.jpg). Two important works are associated with his administration, the non-clerical organization of public education, and the beginning of the colonial expansion of France (French colonial empire). Following the republican programme he proposed to destroy the influence of the clergy in the university and found his own system of republican schooling. He reorganized the committee of public education (law of 27 February 1880), and proposed a regulation for the conferring of university degrees, which, though rejected, aroused violent polemics because the 7th article took away from the unauthorized religious orders the right to teach. He finally succeeded in passing his eponymous laws (Jules Ferry laws) of 16 June 1881 and 28 March 1882, which made primary education in France free (free education), non-clerical (secular education) (laïque (Laïcité)) and mandatory. In higher education, the number of professors, called the "hussards noirs de la République" ''("Republic's black hussars")'' because of their Republican support, doubled under his ministry Further unique points included her Cafe Terrasse (:File:The Terrace Café of the SS France (1912).jpg) and the Salon Mauresque, the latter a reference to the French colonial empire in Africa. The ship also had a gymnasium, an elevator as well as a hair salon, all great novelties at the time. Style Louis seize (Louis XVI) (Louis XVI) was also used within the private apartments of the grand luxe suites onboard. According to a 1912 booklet publicising the liner, her second class accommodation was credited as "match ing the richness and comfort of first class on the old liners." Passengers in this class could also utilise a hair dressing salon. Third and steerage classes were also praised as being well-appointed. Recreation The game of ''El Koura'' is a traditional game that was played in Miliana, Laghouat and other places prior to French colonization (French colonial empire). Similar to association football, Sato, Daisuke. "Sport and Identity in Tunisia." International Journal of Sport and Health Science Vol 3 (2005): 27-34. Retrieved October 3, 2010. the game was played during the spring and times of extreme drought because it was believed to bring rain. Hartland, E. Sidney. "Games." Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics Part 11. Whitefish, Montana: Kessinger, 2003. 167-71. After French colonization, European sports, especially association football, became more popular.


Harbin

in Harbin Medical University to remember his contributions in promoting public health, preventive medicine and medical education. After the plague epidemic Harbin's population continued to increased sharply, especially inside the Chinese Eastern Railway Zone. In 1913 the Chinese Eastern Railway census


Burkina Faso

were centered around anti-imperialism, with his government eschewing all foreign aid, pushing for odious debt reduction, nationalizing all land and mineral wealth, and averting the power and influence of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank. His domestic policies were focused on preventing famine with agrarian self-sufficiency and land reform, prioritizing education with a nation-wide literacy campaign, and promoting public health by vaccinating 2.5 million children against meningitis, yellow fever and measles. Commemorating Thomas Sankara by Farid Omar, ''Group for Research and Initiative for the Liberation of Africa'' (GRILA), November 28, 2007 Other components of his national agenda included planting over ten million trees to halt the growing desertification of the Sahel, doubling wheat production by redistributing land from feudal landlords (feudalism) to peasants, suspending rural poll taxes and domestic rents, and establishing an ambitious road and rail construction program to "tie the nation together." On the localized level Sankara also called on every village to build a medical dispensary and had over 350 communities construct schools with their own labour. Moreover, his commitment to women's rights led him to outlaw female genital mutilation, forced marriages and polygamy; while appointing females to high governmental positions and encouraging them to work outside the home and stay in school even if pregnant. In 1984, on the first anniversary of his accession, he renamed the country Burkina Faso, meaning "the land of upright people" in Moré (Mossi language) and Djula (Bambara language), the two major languages of the country. He also gave it a new flag and wrote a new national anthem (''Une Seule Nuit''). Twenty years later, on October 15, 2007, Thomas Sankara was commemorated around the world in ceremonies that took place in Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal, Niger, Tanzania, Burundi, France, Canada, and the USA. - Burkina Faso National Assembly (National Assembly of Burkina Faso) - The '''Dagaaba''' people (singular '''Dagao''') Constancio Nakuma. An Introduction to the Dagaare Language. on DagaareLinguists' HomePage, update as of 25th May 2003, retrieved 2009-02-12. Dagara, Southern in Gordon, Raymond G., Jr. (ed.), 2005. Ethnologue: Languages of the World, Fifteenth edition. Dallas, Tex.: SIL International. Online version: http: www.ethnologue.com . Retrieved 2009-02-12. ) are an ethnic group in the West African nations of Ghana and Burkina Faso. They speak the Dagaare language, made up of the related Northern Dagaare language, Southern Dagaare language, a number of sub dialects. They are related to the Birifor people and the Dagaare Diola. The language is collectively known as Dagaare (also spelled Dagare, Dagari, Dagarti, Dagaran or, Dagao) and historically some non-natives have taken this as the name of the people. Dr. A. B. Bodomo. Dagaare Language and Culture, Introduction: The Dagaare language and its speakers , from The Structure of Dagaare (1994) Posted by author March 9, 2004. Retrieved 2009-02-12. One historian, describing the former usage of "Dagarti" to refer to this community by colonials, writes : "The name 'Dagarti' appears to have been coined by the first Europeans to visit the region, from the vernacular root ''dagaa''. Correctly 'Dagari' is the name of the language, 'Dagaaba' or 'Dagara' that of the people, and 'Dagaw' or 'Dagawie' that of the land." Ivor Wilks. Wa and the Wala: Islam and Polity in Northwestern Ghana (African Studies) # Cambridge University Press ( 2002) ISBN 978-0-521-89434-0 p. 15. History The source of Dagaaba communities in the pre colonial era remain a point of debate. The evidence of oral tradition is that the Dagaaba are an outgrowth of the Mole-Dagbani group which migrated to the semi-arid Sahel region in the fourteenth century CE. They are believed to have further migrated to the lower northern part of the region in the seventeenth century. From well before the appearance of Europeans, the Dagaaba lived in small scale agricultural communities, not centralised into any large state like structure. Ethnological studies point to oral literature which tells that the Dagaaba periodically, and ultimately successfully, resisted attempts at conquest by states in the south of modern Ghana, as well as the Kingdoms of Dagbon (Dagomba people), Mamprugu and Gonja (Gonja people) in the north. One thesis based on oral evidence is that the Dagaaba formed as a break away faction of Dagbon under Na Nyanse. Benjamin Kunbuor. “Customary Law of the Dagara” of Northern Ghana: Indigenous Rules or a Social Construction, Journal of Dagaare Studies, Vol 2 ( 2002). On early history, he cites: Tuurey, G. (1982) An Introduction to the Mole-Speaking Community. Catholic Press: Wa.; Lentz, C. (1994) “A Dagara Rebellion against Dagomba rule?: Contested Stories of Origin in North-Western Ghana”, in ''Journal of African Law'' Vol. 35: 457-492 The colonial borders, demarcated during the Scramble for Africa, placed them in northwestern Ghana and southern Burkina Faso, as well as small populations in Côte d'Ivoire. The instrument Believed to have been developed independently of the Southern African and South American instruments now called the marimba, oral histories of the balafon date it to at least the rise of the Mali Empire in the 12th century CE. Balafon is a Manding name, but variations exist across West Africa, including the ''Balangi'' in Sierra Leone Cootje Van Oven. Music of Sierra Leone, in African Arts, Vol. 3, No. 4 (Summer, 1970), pp. 20-27+71. and the Gyil of the Dagara (Dagara people), Lobi and Gurunsi from Ghana, Burkina Faso and Côte d'Ivoire. similar instruments are played in parts of Central Africa, with the ancient Kingdom of Kongo denoting the instrument as ''palaku''. The ancient African religion of Vodoun (West African Vodun) is an established religion with its ancient roots in West Africa. Its modern form is practiced across West Africa in the countries now known as Benin, Togo, and Burkina Faso, among others. In Haiti, Cuba, and other Caribbean islands (Caribbean), the worship of the Vodoun gods (called ''lwa'' or ''loas'' (Loa)) is practiced in a syncretic (syncretism) form that has been greatly modified by contact with Catholicism. The Voodoo (Haitian Vodou) of Haiti and Louisiana Voodoo are better known to many English speakers; similar practices among Spanish speakers in Cuba are called Santería. - valign "top" width "25%" Albania Algeria Argentina Armenia Australia Austria Azerbaijan The Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Brazil Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Canada Chad Chile China Colombia Comoros Republic of the Congo Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Croatia Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic width "25%" Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Estonia Finland France Gabon The Gambia Georgia (Georgia (country)) Germany Ghana Greece Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Honduras Hungary Hong Kong Iceland India Indonesia Iran Ireland (Republic of Ireland) Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kenya Kyrgyz Republic Latvia - Benin, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Senegal, Togo The Communaute Financiere Africaine franc is pegged to the euro. Before 1999, it was pegged to the French Franc. CFA franc **French protectorate over the Sultanate of Bangassou, 1894 *Burkina Faso was since 20 February 1895 a French protectorate named Upper Volta (French Upper Volta) (Haute-Volta) *Chad: Baghirmi state 20 September 1897 a French protectorate - BF (ISO 3166-2:BF) Burkina Faso ''13 regions (regions of Burkina Faso)'' 45 provinces (provinces of Burkina Faso) - - id "BF" BF Burkina Faso 1984 .bf


Staten Island

Will Never Die: A Study of Jehovah's Witnesses publisher Constable & Co, London year 1969 pages 51 isbn 09-455940-6 The traditional Bible Student prayer and testimony meetings were divided into two parts with one becoming a "service meeting", devoted to promoting public preaching. M. James Penton, ''Apocalypse Delayed'', University of Toronto Press, 1997, page 63. In 1924 he expanded his means of spreading the Watch Tower message


Food and Drug Administration

., Commissioner of Food and Drugs accessdate August 30, 2012 publisher US FDA website The '''Food and Drug Administration''' ('''FDA''' or '''USFDA''') is a federal agency (List of United States federal agencies) of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, one of the United States federal executive departments. The FDA is responsible for protecting and promoting public health through the regulation


Japan

: ieas.berkeley.edu ccs history.html "CCS History" , Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley He was also president and co-founder of the Japan Policy Research Institute (now based at the University of San Francisco), an organization promoting public education about Japan and Asia.


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017