Places Known For

passing close


Gällivare

route E10 E10 road, connecting Luleå with Norway and passing close by Gällivare (south of Kiruna) and Narvik (on the Norwegian coast). A short road connects to Kurravaara at the Torne river and ends there. Another road connects Kiruna with Nikkaluokta close to Kebnekaise and is used by tourists to get to the mountains. It also passes by or nearby several villages in the Kalix river valley. The central activities of Laestadians are haps (gatherings of teenagers and young


Luleå

thumb right View from just outside Kiruna, with European route E10 left to Luleå (File:Sweden Kiruna 3.jpg) and right to Narvik, Norway (and to Kiruna's railway station) Kiruna is located at the E10 (European route E10) road, connecting Luleå with Norway and passing close by Gällivare (south of Kiruna) and Narvik (on the Norwegian coast). A short road connects to Kurravaara at the Torne river and ends there. Another road connects Kiruna with Nikkaluokta close to Kebnekaise

and is used by tourists to get to the mountains. It also passes by or nearby several villages in the Kalix river valley. thumb right View from just outside Kiruna, with European route E10 left to Luleå (File:Sweden Kiruna 3.jpg) and right to Narvik, Norway (and to Kiruna's railway station) Kiruna is located at the E10 (European route E10) road, connecting Luleå with Norway and passing close by Gällivare (south of Kiruna) and Narvik (on the Norwegian coast). A short road


Ciudad del Este

, where Rio Paraná and Rio Iguaçu join, is a ferry crossing to Puerto Iguazú in Argentina without crossing Brazilian territory. The ferry runs hourly during daylight hours for AR$5. There's a bus to Ciudad del Este passing close-by. From the centre (Av. General Bernardino Caballero), take a bus labeled ''Tres Fronteras'' (destination, not the company name) and ask to be dropped at ''la balsa'' (the ferry). * It is also possible to take a bus from the Puerto Iguazú bus terminal through


Antipolo

Creek (which serves as the boundary between Pasig's barangays Dela Paz-Manggahan-Rosario-Sta. Lucia and the Municipality of Cainta), the Kasibulan Creek (situated at Vista Verde, Brgy. San Isidro, Cainta), the Palanas Creek (leaving Antipolo through Brgy. Muntindilao), the Bulaw Creek (on Brgy. Mambungan, besides the Valley Golf and Country Club), and the "Hinulugang Taktak" Falls of Brgy. Dela Paz (fed by the Taktak Creek passing close to the Antipolo Town Square), thus being the detached and long-abandoned Antipolo River. Since the early 1600s up to the period of Japanese Imperialism, over a thousand Catholic devotees coming from "Maynilad" (Manila), "Hacienda Pineda" (Pasay), "San Juan (San Juan, Metro Manila) del Monte", "Hacienda de Mandaloyon" (Mandaluyong), "Hacienda Mariquina" (Marikina), "Barrio Pateros (Pateros, Metro Manila)", "Pueblo de Tagig" (Taguig), and "San Pedro de Macati" (Makati), followed the trail of the Parian Creek to the Pilgrimage Cathedral on the mountainous pueblo of Antipolo, Morong (Morong, Rizal) (the present-day Rizal Province). The Antipoleños and several locals from the far-reached barrios of "Poblacion de San Mateo", "Montalban" (Rodriguez (Rodriguez, Rizal)), "Monte de Tanhai" (Tanay), "Santa Rosa-Oroquieta" (Teresa (Teresa, Rizal)), and "Punta Ibayo" (Baras (Baras, Rizal)), had also navigated this freshwater creek once to go down to the vast "Kapatagan" (Rice plains) of lowland Pasig. Even the marian (marian devotions) processions of the Our Lady of Peace and Good Voyage passed this route back and forth eleven times. The creek has been also used during the British Occupation of Manila in 1762 to 1764 by the Royal British army, under the leadership of General William Draper (William Draper (British Army officer)) and Vice Admiral Sir Samuel Cornish, 1st Baronet, to transport their red troops (and also the Sepoys they've brought from East India) upstream to take over the nearby forest-surrounded villages of Cainta and Taytay (Taytay, Rizal). They even did an ambush at the "Plaza Central" in front of the Pasig Cathedral, and turned the Roman Catholic Parish into their military headquarters, with the church's fortress-like "Campanilla" (belfry (belfry (architecture))) serving as a watchtower against Spanish defenders sailing from the walled city of Intramuros via the Pasig River. But ironically, the Sepoys backstabbed their abusive British (Great Britain) lieutenants and sided with the combined forces of the Spanish Conquistadors (assigned by the Governor-General Simon de Anda y Salazar), local rice farmers, fisherfolk, and even Chinese traders. After the British Invasion, the Sepoys remained and intermarried with Filipina women, and that explains the Hindu features of some of today's citizens of Pasig, especially Cainta and Taytay. History The city was named after the ''tipolo'' (breadfruit) tree (''Artocarpus incisa''), which was in abundance in the area. Franciscan missionaries (missionary) arrived in Antipolo in 1578, and built a small church on what is now Boso-Boso Church (Nuestra Señora Dela Annunciata Church (Antipolo)). They were soon replaced in 1591 by the Jesuits, who organized the village into a parish. By 1601, The Christian population of Antipolo had grown to about 3,000 as the indigenous Dumagat population dwindled and moved deeper into the interiors. An uprising (Philippine revolts against Spain#The Chinese revolt of 1602) of Manila's Chinese residents reached Antipolo in 1602 that lead to the razing of the church. On March 25, 1626, the image now known as the ''Virgin of Antipolo'' was brought from Acapulco, New Spain (now Mexico) by Governor-General (Governor-General of the Philippines) Juan Niño de Tabora, who relinquished the image to the Jesuits for Antipolo's church. In 1650, the village was organized into a town and became part of Tondo Province. When the province was divided in 1853, Antipolo became a part of the District of San Mateo de los Montes, which later became the District of Morong. The Recollects took over Antipolo in 1864. It was during these years that the Virgin of Antipolo gained a following of devotees. Devotees from Manila and nearby towns and provinces flock to Antipolo on foot or on hammocks, trekking along mountain trails and springs. During the First Republic (First Philippine Republic), the town served as the capital of Morong, until it was occupied by the America (United States)ns on June 4, 1899; the Revolutionary Government then transferred Morong's capital to Tanay. Soon after, the Americans established a civil government in 1901, Valentin Sumulong became the first municipal president. On June 11, 1901, Antipolo was incorporated into the newly established Province of Rizal, which included towns of Morong District and Manila Province. In 1903, Antipolo, Boso-Boso and Teresa (Teresa, Rizal) were merged. The town's territory was expanded again in 1913 to add the sitios of Mayamot and Bulao; just to lose Teresa six years later to become an independent municipality. The Manila Railroad Company (currently Philippine National Railways) inaugurated a railway service to Antipolo on December 24, 1908. Long before the LRT Line 2 (Manila Light Rail Transit System Line 2) finally opened its services in Santolan in the Pasig-Marikina border in 2004, steam train services had once served those places in the past, even before World War II. In Marikina, there is a street named "Daangbakal", also called by the names of "Shoe Avenue Extension", "Munding Avenue" and "Bagong Silang". There is also a similar "Daangbakal" in the San Mateo (San Mateo, Rizal)-Montalban (Rodriguez (Rodriguez, Rizal)) area, and on the maps one can notice that the two roads should have been connected with each other. In fact, as the name suggests in Tagalog, these streets were once a single railway line. The two sides of the "Daangbakal" roads were once connected by a bridge in the San Mateo-Marikina border. However, as the railroad tracks have been largely ignored after the Japanese Occupation and was transformed into separate highways, the railway connection was abandoned. The old railroad tracks, called the Marikina Line, was connected from Tutuban station in Manila, passing through Tramo (Brgy. Rosario, Pasig) coming all the way to the town of Marikina up to Montalban. On the northern end of the "Daangbakal" road in Montablan is a basketball court. That basketball court which stands today, surrounded by the Montalban Catholic Church and Cemetery, was once the railway station terminus of that particular line. The present-day Santo Niño Elementary School in Marikina was said to be a train depot. And also it was said that a railroad station once stood in the Marikina City Sports Park. The Marikina Line was completed in 1906, and continued its operation until 1936. It was said that the Japanese Imperial Army made use of this railway line during the Second World War. These railways were dismantled during the 1960s and were converted into ordinary roads. Today, the citizens are dependent on Tricycles, Jeepneys, Taxis, FX, Buses, and AUV's which contribute to the everyday unusual and unbearable traffic of Metropolitan Manila. Even now, there is uncertainty in the Northrail project, which links Manila to the northern provinces of Luzon, because of corruption within the project's construction. Aside from the Marikina Line, two other lines have existed before but are now removed permanently. First is the Cavite Line, which passed through Paco (Paco railway station), Parañaque, Bacoor and up to Naic, Cavite. Completed in 1908, its operation continued until 1936. Second is the Antipolo Line, which passed through Santa Mesa (Santa Mesa railway station), Mandaluyong, Pasig, Cainta, Taytay (Taytay, Rizal), up to Antipolo near the "Hinulugang Taktak" Falls. There is also a street named "Daangbakal" in Antipolo, where like the "Daangbakal" roads on Marikina and San Mateo, a railway line once existed. The railroad tracks also passed through what is now the Ortigas Avenue Extension. Its operation ceased in 1917. During the start of the Second World War in the Philippines, Antipolo became a refugee destination for many citizens from Manila and its suburbs to avoid the Japanese invaders vying for the occupation of the Philippine capital. Also, two guerrilla units operated in the town against the Japanese. They were the Hunters ROTC under Miguel Ver and Terry Adevoso and the Marking Filipino and American Troops, which were established and led by Marcos Villa Agustin, more popularly known under the name Brig. Gen. Agustin Marking. Many inhabitants were tortured and killed by the Japanese, including Mayor Pascual Oliveros and his son Reynaldo, Padre Eusebio Carreon, Padre Ariston Ocampo, Sis. Ma. Elizabeth Cagulanas, RVM, Sis. Ma. Consuelo Recio, RVM; Ambrosio Masangkay, Alfonso Oliveros and Atty. Francisco C. Gedang Sr. The liberation of Antipolo from the Japanese forces was bloody and devastating. On February 17, 1945, Antipolo was heavily bombarded by American planes. Antipolo residents evacuated to Sitio Colaique and up to the towns of Angono (Angono, Rizal), Santolan, and Marikina (Marikina City). To protect the image from being destroyed, Stevenson Sayson, then the sacristan mayor, and members of the community brought with them the Virgin of Antipolo. The bombings on March 6–7, 1945 destroyed the church and after twelve days of battle, the American and Filipino soldiers and aided the local recognized guerrillas liberated the town on March 12, 1945. After the war, a temporary church was built and the Virgin of Antipolo was returned from the Quiapo (Quiapo, Manila) Church on October 15, 1945. Started the Allied Invasion of Antipolo on February to August 1945, the stronghold of all combined military forces of the Filipino soldiers of the Philippine Commonwealth Army 4th and 42nd Infantry Division and the American soldiers of the United States Army 43rd Infantry Division and aided the local guerrilla resistance fighters of the Marking's Filipino-American Troops and the Hunters ROTC was liberated and invaded the municipal town of Antipolo and defeats Japanese Imperial armed forces and ended World War II. After independence Devotees started to flock to the town and on May 6, 1947; the first procession of the Virgin of Antipolo was held starting at the hills of Pinagmisahan. In 1948, a national committee was formed to undertake a nationwide fund-raising campaign to build the Cathedral of Antipolo. On June 15, 1952, Hinulugang Taktak was proclaimed a National Park by Pres. (President of the Philippines) Jessie Roxas, and on January 14, 1954, the Bishops of the Philippines proclaimed the Cathedral of Antipolo as the official shrine of the Virgin of Antipolo. In 1960s, the town proper, or ''poblacion'', was widened and the Sumulong Highway was constructed. In the 1970s, the Marikina (Marikina City)-Infanta (Infanta, Quezon) Road, better known as the Marcos Highway, was constructed, traversing the mountains of Antipolo. The Roman Catholic Diocese of Antipolo was created on June 25, 1983, with Rev. Protacio G. Gungon, D.D. as the first bishop of the diocese. Cityhood On February 13, 1998 (along with Parañaque, Former Pres. Fidel V. Ramos signed Republic Act No. 8508, making the Municipality of Antipolo into a component city (Cities of the Philippines) of Rizal Province and on April 4, 1998, it was ratified in a plebiscite. In the election that followed, Angelito Gatlabayan was elected as its first city mayor. Demographics Wikipedia:Antipolo Commons:Category:Antipolo City


Bossier City, Louisiana

enters the Shreveport (Shreveport, Louisiana)-Bossier City (Bossier City, Louisiana) metropolitan area, intersecting Interstate 49 near downtown Shreveport and passing close to Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier city. Webster Parish is part of the Minden Micropolitan Statistical Area as well as the Shreveport (Shreveport, Louisiana)–Bossier City (Bossier City, Louisiana)–Minden Shreveport-Bossier City-Minden combined statistical area Combined


Tristan da Cunha


Palmerston North

New Zealand Koru Lounge in the terminal. By road Palmerston North is 7 hr by car from Auckland and 2 hr from the capital Wellington. The city is located on State Highway 3 (SH 3), with State Highways 56 and 57 passing close by. *''From Auckland'', follow State Highway 1, turning off onto State Highway 3 at Sanson. You'll approach the city from the north. *''From Napier and Hastings (Hastings (New Zealand))'', follow State Highway 2, turning off onto State Highway 3


Derby

;ref name "WC" ''. '''Shardlow''' is a village in Derbyshire, England about 6 miles southeast of Derby and 11 miles southwest of Nottingham. It is part of the civil parish of Shardlow and Great Wilne, and the district of South Derbyshire. It is also very close to the border with Leicestershire which follows the River Trent, passing close by the south of the village. Just across the Trent is the Castle Donington parish of North West Leicestershire. Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Derbyshire Derby wikipedia:Derby


Palau

Commons:Category:Palau WikiPedia:Palau Dmoz:Regional Oceania Palau


Shreveport, Louisiana

the Shreveport (Shreveport, Louisiana)-Bossier City (Bossier City, Louisiana) metropolitan area, intersecting Interstate 49 near downtown Shreveport and passing close to Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier city. *Shreveport, Louisiana - I-220 (Interstate 220 (Louisiana)) *Jackson, Mississippi - I-220 (Interstate 220 (Mississippi)) '''Interstate 49''' (I-49) is currently an intrastate (List of intrastate Interstate Highways) Interstate Highway located entirely within


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