Places Known For

part documentary


Barentsburg

, geologists, archeologists, biologists, glaciologists, geographers, etc. Year-round meteorological observatory and the northernmost cosmic rays station work in the town too. Film, Dream Town Adrian Briscoe completed Dream Town, a feature-length film about Barentsburg in 2014. Part documentary, part fantasy, Dream Town examines the stark reality of the miners, scientists, and children who live there and contrasts their unusual existence with fictional interludes they created with the director


El Alamein

, reporting on a two-part documentary series then being broadcast on Germany's ZDF television channel, entitled ''Rommels Krieg, Rommels Schatz'' authored by Jörg Müllner and Jean-Christoph Caron. The MI5 file records that Rauff was posted to Tunis in 1942 as head of the ''Sicherheitsdienst'', where he led an ''Einsatzkommando'' (an SS task force) which conducted a "well-organised persecution campaign against the country's Jews and Partisans (Partisan (military))". The Jewish community was particularly hard hit: El Alamein was the beginning of the end of German successes in the desert. Now vastly outnumbered, the war became a battle of attrition which the Germans could not win. The British were now equipped with new M4 Sherman tanks armed with a 75 mm (75 mm gun (US)) high velocity gun, making it capable of penetrating the armour of any German vehicle. * 21 June: Tobruk captured by Axis forces * 30 June: Axis reaches El Alamein and attack, the First Battle of El Alamein begins * 4 July: First Battle of El Alamein continues as Axis digs in and Eighth Army launch series of attacks The 164th Light Afrika Division fought at El Alamein and took heavy casualties in the westward retreat. It was sent to Tripoli for rehabilitation, but the necessary resources were not available, so it was sent to Tunisia to build fortifications. It was almost entirely destroyed there, and the remnants were lost in general Axis surrender in May. The German siege of the Libyan Mediterranean Sea port town of Tobruk began on 10 April 1941. After desperate fighting, most of the Australian forces were relieved by October 1941. However, the town was continuously contested until the Allied victory at El Alamein in 1942. The Allied defence of Tobruk lengthened German supply lines and diverted troops who might have been deployed against Allied troops elsewhere. This memorial commemorated the endurance of those who were besieged, who were given the honorific title, "Rats of Tobruk". : More seriously, there were two battles of El Alamein, the First (First Battle of El Alamein) (July 1942) and Second (Second Battle of El Alamein) (October 1942). The First prevented a German breakthrough to Alexandria, which would have essentially destroyed the British hold on Egypt and blocked access to the Eastern Mediterranean; the Second broke the back of the Italian and German forces in the Egyptian area, and drove them back as far as North-West Africa, working with the Allied landings in the west to clear North Africa completely. The strategic effect of either of these should be apparent if you look at a map. * '''Point 204''': This little-known clash occurred in the Alem Hamza area of the Gazala Line on 5 June 1942. The single company involved suffered heavy casualties in a clash with Italian troops. Among the six killed was H.P. Masterton-Smith, the 1931 Comrades Marathon winner. * '''El Alamein defence''': Following the breaching of the Gazala Line and the fall of Tobruk, British and Commonwealth forces retired to El Alamein, not far from Alexandria. Here a comprehensive series of defences were prepared. In July 1942 the Carbineers played its part in denying the Germans the breakthrough here that they needed to attain victory in this theatre. * '''Qattara''': On 26–27 July 1942 a detachment of the Carbineers was involved in this subsidiary action in the Alamein defensive battles of July 1942. * '''Point 204''': This little-known clash occurred in the Alem Hamza area of the Gazala Line on 5 June 1942. The single company involved suffered heavy casualties in a clash with Italian troops. Among the six killed was H.P. Masterton-Smith, the 1931 Comrades Marathon winner. * '''El Alamein defence''': Following the breaching of the Gazala Line and the fall of Tobruk, British and Commonwealth forces retired to El Alamein, not far from Alexandria. Here a comprehensive series of defences were prepared. In July 1942 the Carbineers played its part in denying the Germans the breakthrough here that they needed to attain victory in this theatre. * '''Qattara''': On 26–27 July 1942 a detachment of the Carbineers was involved in this subsidiary action in the Alamein defensive battles of July 1942. * '''Qattara''': On 26–27 July 1942 a detachment of the Carbineers was involved in this subsidiary action in the Alamein defensive battles of July 1942. * '''El Alamein''': The Carbineers played a small but eventful part in the huge and decisive Second Battle of El Alamein in October–November 1942. The Carbineer participation was confined mainly to the initial phase launched on 23 October. Italy, 1944–1945 On 1 September 1942, as the ''Afrikakorps'' assaulted Allied positions at El Alamein, ''JG 27'' had their best day. ''Hpt.'' Marseille alone claimed 17, destroying eight P-40s in 10 minutes during one sortie over Alam Halfa. However it believed that at least two, and as many as four of Marseille's "kills" were not shot down. Weal 2003, p. 86. At the end of 1941 the regiment was made part of the 5th South African Infantry Brigade. In March of the same year additional personnel was received from the 3rd battalion of the Transvaal Scottish Regiment and in April Lieutenant-Colonel W. P. Minnaar succeeded McHardy as its commanding officer. Minnaar commanded the regiment during the El Alamein fighting in June. In January 1943 the unit was sent back to the then-Union of South Africa and placed under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel A. S. Nel, who became the commanding officer of the amalgamated Regiment Botha (Regiment Botha) President Steyn in August of the same year. After the collapse of Tobruk in June 1942, the regiment lost its headquarters unit as well as its 8th and 9th batteries, except for one troop of 8th Battery. This troop, together with the Coldstream Guards, were the only units to drive out in formation. The remaining (7th) battery of the regiment was first attached to 7 Field Regiment and took part in the fighting at El Alamein in October 1942. It subsequently joined 4 22nd Field Regiment, South African Artillery and saw action throughout the Italian Campaign (Italian Campaign (World War II)). commons:العلمين


Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

to live under 19th-century conditions. During the voyage, the footage was aired (beginning in June 2001) as a 16-part documentary on Life Network, and later on other networks like the UK incarnation of the ''Travel Channel''. Topsail Entertainment, which produced the series, later went on to produce the popular series Trailer Park Boys. Younghusband had made a guest appearance on the Topsail-produced series Black Harbour in 1998. During Father Le Loutre’s War, the conflict


Abu Ghraib

series by Vladimir Kara-Murza (in Russian). a four-part documentary on the Soviet dissident movement. In 2005, with the revelations about captives in the Guantánamo Bay detention camp, Abu Ghraib and the CIA secret prisons, Bukovsky criticized the rationalization of torture. Torture's Long Shadow, ''The Washington Post'', 2005. Bukovsky warned about some parallels between the formations of the Soviet Union and the European Union. Former Soviet Dissident Warns For EU Dictatorship, interview with Bukovsky by Paul Belien. Transcript of Mr Bukovsky’s Brussels speech. The Brussels Journal, 27 February 2006. thumb right 180px Baghdad Central Prison cell block (File:Abu Ghraib cell block.jpg) The '''Baghdad Central Prison''', formerly known US releases scores from Baghdad prison, ''Google News'' ''Agence France-Presse'', February 12, 2009 as '''Abu Ghraib prison''' ( *Sure; with Guantanamo (w:Guantanamo) and Abu Ghraib (w:Abu Ghraib), and headlines about Michael B. Mukasey (w:Michael B. Mukasey) such as ''Is It Torture? The Nominee Won’t Say'', why wouldn't an examination of BDSM and torture in the popular culture be appropriate? --David Shankbone (User:David Shankbone) 20:50, 21 October 2007 (UTC) ::This is Wikinews...not Wikipedia :) And I think its a GREAT interview...this should bring in some readers. I like to have something a bit controversial every now and then. :) ''DragonFire1024 (User:DragonFire1024)'' ('''Talk to the Dragon (User talk:DragonFire1024)''') 20:51, 21 October 2007 (UTC) :'''Michael:''' It’s all ridiculous. I don’t get embarrassed being an American, but I definitely avoid going places where Americans aren’t popular. :'''EW:''' But aside from all that, just living here year after year when you have a government that you hate, and that is systematically destroying the fabric of our society, and just taking apart everything they can think of. “Health care for children? Veto that. School system? Let’s destroy that.” Whatever you can think of. “Prisoners rights (w:Prisoners rights)? Let’s create Guantanamo Bay (w:Guantanamo Bay) and Abu Ghraib (w:Abu Ghraib).” Everything! I just sent a check today to the ACLU (w:ACLU). It’s really the time to be doing that. '''DS: Nadine Strossen is such a believer (ACLU President Strossen on religion, drugs, guns and impeaching George Bush). I guess you need to be a believer to be President of the ACLU. What trait do you deplore in yourself? The reports undermine claims made by several Bush-era officials that the leaked events of Abu Ghraib (w:Abu Ghraib) and Guantanamo Bay (w:Guantanamo Bay) were the result of "bad apples" from the bottom of both the CIA and the Pentagon's command structure. Says Carl Levin (w:Carl Levin), chair of the intelligence committee: "The paper trail on abuse leads to top civilian leaders, and our report connects the dots."


French colonial empire

African Connection (2013)'', 3 part documentary series by Al Jazeera * ''French Colonial History'' an annual volume of refereed, scholarly articles * L'Afrique francophone * French Colonialism, lecture on the colonial period 1871 to 1914, via Open Yale Courses (45-min audio video text) * Area Of French Empire in 1940 Further unique points included her Cafe Terrasse (:File:The Terrace Café of the SS France (1912).jpg) and the Salon Mauresque, the latter a reference to the French colonial empire in Africa. The ship also had a gymnasium, an elevator as well as a hair salon, all great novelties at the time. Style Louis seize (Louis XVI) (Louis XVI) was also used within the private apartments of the grand luxe suites onboard. According to a 1912 booklet publicising the liner, her second class accommodation was credited as "match ing the richness and comfort of first class on the old liners." Passengers in this class could also utilise a hair dressing salon. Third and steerage classes were also praised as being well-appointed. Recreation The game of ''El Koura'' is a traditional game that was played in Miliana, Laghouat and other places prior to French colonization (French colonial empire). Similar to association football, Sato, Daisuke. "Sport and Identity in Tunisia." International Journal of Sport and Health Science Vol 3 (2005): 27-34. Retrieved October 3, 2010. the game was played during the spring and times of extreme drought because it was believed to bring rain. Hartland, E. Sidney. "Games." Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics Part 11. Whitefish, Montana: Kessinger, 2003. 167-71. After French colonization, European sports, especially association football, became more popular.


Yaroslavl

WikiPedia:Yaroslavl commons:Ярославль


Kingston, Ontario

of ''Building the Impossible'', a four part documentary commissioned by the BBC in which a team of experts undertook the challenge of building historical inventions to their original specification to see if they really worked. Baillie was formerly deputy director of the UK Centre for Materials Education at Liverpool University, Liverpool, United Kingdom. The '''Battle of Fort Frontenac''' took place on August 26–28, 1758 during the Seven Years' War (referred to as the French and Indian War in North America) between France (Early Modern France) and Great Britain (Kingdom of Great Britain). The location of the battle was Fort Frontenac, a French fort (fortification) and trading post which is located at the site of present-day Kingston, Ontario, at the eastern end of Lake Ontario where it drains into the St. Lawrence River. Steve Fonyo Drive in Kingston, Ontario is named after him, as is Steve Fonyo Beach in Victoria, British Columbia where he ended his run. Fonyo Road was also named in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. '''Kingston Collegiate and Vocational Institute''' (K.C.V.I.) is a secondary school in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario, Canada. Founded in 1792 by Reverend John Stuart based upon a grant for secondary education in the colony of Upper Canada, it moved to its present location in 1892. It is considered the oldest public (Public school (government funded)) secondary school in Ontario. Girls were first admitted as students in January, 1877 and the school has remained co-educational since. The oldest remaining wing of the school is the 1915 wing, which now houses science laboratories. The original wing was destroyed by fire and has since been replaced * Samuel D. Purdy 1816 - founder of first stagecoach line in Upper Canada from York to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) * William Weller 1832 - from Coffin Block to Kingston, Ontario and also operated services in Cobourg, Ontario, Port Hope, Ontario, Peterborough, Ontario, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario)-Prescott (Prescott, Ontario); Weller was mayor of Cobourg, Ontario * John Playter (Playter Estates) 1828-1832 from York to Newmarket, Ontario * Samuel D. Purdy 1816 - founder of first stagecoach line in Upper Canada from York to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) * William Weller 1832 - from Coffin Block to Kingston, Ontario and also operated services in Cobourg, Ontario, Port Hope, Ontario, Peterborough, Ontario, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario)-Prescott (Prescott, Ontario); Weller was mayor of Cobourg, Ontario * John Playter (Playter Estates) 1828-1832 from York to Newmarket, Ontario Other significant urban areas along the corridor include: Lévis (Lévis, Quebec), Cornwall (Cornwall, Ontario), Brockville, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Belleville (Belleville, Ontario), Mississauga, Niagara Falls (Niagara Falls, Ontario), Chatham–Kent, Sherbrooke, Laval (Laval, Quebec), Gatineau, Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), Guelph, Brantford, Barrie, and Sarnia. left thumb 400-series highways (Ontario) 400-series (File:Queensway east of Riverside Drive Ottawa.jpg) freeways are the major transportation system in Southern (Southern Ontario) Ontario. *Farr, Dorothy. ''Horatio Walker 1858-1938'' Kingston, Ontario: Agnes Etherington Art Centre, 1977. In popular culture Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario band, the Tragically Hip, released a song called "Speed River" on their 2009 album ''We Are The Same (We Are the Same)''. Richardson was born in Winnipeg (Winnipeg, Manitoba), Manitoba and attended St. John's-Ravenscourt School. After attending Queen's University (Queen's University, Kingston) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He served as an anti-submarine pilot based in Iceland and Labrador during World War II. He finished his War service with the rank of pilot officer. '''The Pita Pit''' is a quick-service restaurant franchise serving pita sandwiches. Its headquarters are in Kingston, Ontario, Canada. "Contact." The Pita Pit. Retrieved on February 23, 2010. Its United States headquarters is in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. "Contact Pita Pit." The Pita Pit. Retrieved on February 23, 2010. The first shop was opened by John Sotiriadis and Nelson Lang in 1995 near Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario. In 1997, The Pita Pit started to expand within Canada and in 1999 they began franchising in the United States. There are about 350 restaurants across the United States and Canada. - * University of Ottawa, Program in Epidemiology, Ottawa, Canada * Queen's University, Community Health and Epidemiology, Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Canada * Lakehead University, Master of Public Health (MPH) Thunder Bay, Canada At Havana 1965, Ivkov shared 2nd-4th places with Geller and Fischer, and defeated Fischer for the second time in their game; the winner was Smyslov. In fact he was leading before he blew an easily won game against a tail ender; this would have been his greatest victory. Ivkov shared 2nd-3rd places in the Yugoslav Championship at Titograd (Podgorica) 1965 with 11.5 18 as Gligoric won. Then at Zagreb 1965, Ivkov scored perhaps his most impressive career victory, sharing the title with Wolfgang Uhlmann on 13.5 19, ahead of World Champion Tigran Petrosian, Lajos Portisch, Larsen, and Bronstein. Ivkov won at Venice 1966 with 5 7. He ended 4th at Beverwijk 1966 on 10 15 as Polugaevsky won. Ivkov won at Eersel 1966 with 4 5. He had a disappointing result at the elite Piatigorsky Cup tournament at Santa Monica, California, finishing with a minus score, as Spassky won. But then he nearly won the 1966 Open Canadian Chess Championship at Kingston (Kingston, Ontario). He shared 3rd-4th at Sarajevo 1966 with 10 15, behind winners Mikhail Tal and Dragoljub Ciric. He was 4th at Palma de Mallorca 1966 with 9.5 15 behind winner Tal. The Queen’s Principalship (1936-1951) After nearly eight years as the President of the University of Alberta, Robert Wallace was offered the Principalship at Queen’s University in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario by chancellor James Richardson. Wallace accepted the offer, and was installed as the University’s eleventh Principal on September 1, 1936. He was the first scientist to ever hold the position. (Nine of the previous 10 Principals were ministers, the other was a Classics professor.) He would hold the position until his formal retirement in 1951. *Robert Malcolm Memorial Pipe Band (Burnaby, BC (British Columbia)) *Rob Roy Pipeband and Highland dancers (Kingston (Kingston, Ontario), Ontario) *Rocky Mountain Pipe Band (Calgary, Alberta) In 2000, Corus Entertainment acquired the stations. In February 2001, Corus converted CKDO to its short-lived talk radio network (also consisting of CHML (CHML (AM)) in Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario), CFPL (CFPL (AM)) in London (London, Ontario), CKRU in Peterborough (Peterborough, Ontario), CFFX (CFFX-FM) in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) and CJOY in Guelph), but the station returned to the oldies format by the summer of that year. On the outbreak of the War of 1812 he joined the 2nd Regiment of York Militia as a Subaltern and was seriously wounded at the Battle of Queenston Heights. He crawled from the battlefield to a nearby village where his wounds were hurriedly dressed. Because of an infection caused by the late removal of a bullet he was not fit to fight when the Americans attacked York in April, 1813. McLean buried the York militia’s colours in the woods and escaped to Kingston, Ontario. He fought again at Battle of Lundy's Lane, but was captured by the Americans and held prisoner for the remainder of the war. He was born in Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) in Upper Canada in 1791, the son of a Scottish (Scotland) immigrant who served with Joseph Brant during the American Revolution. The family moved from Kingston to Newark (Niagara-on-the-Lake) and then York (Toronto), where Thomson began work as a clerk in a general store. In 1810, he was transferred to Kingston. Although a member of the local militia, he did not serve in the War of 1812 due to poor health. In 1815, his employer returned to France and Thomson purchased the Kingston store. In 1819, he became editor and owner of the ''Upper Canada Herald'', a weekly newspaper, which soon had the largest circulation of any newspaper in Upper Canada. He also printed pamphlets, books and reports, including ''The statutes of the province of Upper Canada'' in 1831. He was born in New Jersey in 1785 and later settled in Nelson Township (Nelson, Ontario), Halton County (Halton County, Ontario). He founded a settlement called Hannahville with his brothers, help set up the first school in the area and served on the district council. In 1828, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Upper Canada for Halton as a Reformer (Reform Party (pre-Confederation)); he did not run in 1830 but was reelected in 1834. He was elected to the 1st Parliament of the Province of Canada in East Halton. He opposed the move of the capital from Kingston (Kingston, Ontario) to Montreal. In 1841, he supported the District Councils Act (District Councils Act (1841)), which was opposed by the other Reformers. He also expressed his disapproval after the Reform government resigned in protest in 1843. So, another Reform candidate was chosen to run in East Halton in 1844; when Hopkins ran as well, the vote was split and the Conservative (Conservative Party of Canada (historical)) candidate, George Chalmers, won. In 1850, he was elected again in East Halton as a Clear Grit, defeating the incumbent Reformer, John Wetenhall. After 1851, he retired from politics. He moved to Hamilton (Hamilton, Ontario) in 1870. Follow-up reports indicate that rumbles could be felt as far as Kingston, Ontario (w:Kingston, Ontario), Montreal, Quebec (w:Montreal) and New York (w:New York). The Canadian Geological Survey stated 14 seismometer (w:Seismometer) stations revising a magnitude of 4.5 from 2.99 on the Richter Scale (w:Richter_magnitude_scale). The USGS pronounced it to be a 4.0 tremor.


Uzbekistan

: 24,000 on the Romanian side, and 3,000 on the Bulgarian side . As the Soviet Union collapsed, Podnieks cooperated with British (Great Britain) TV to give them a first-hand insight on the events in Soviet Union. Over three years, Podnieks in collaboration with the British, filmed a five part documentary titled ''Hello, do you hear us?''. It showed civil unrest in Uzbekistan, survivors of the earthquake (1988 Spitak earthquake) in Armenia


Milwaukee

paul_l.html ''American Masters—Les Paul'' . and was broadcast on October 17, 2008, on BBC Four as part of its Guitar Night. The première coincided with the final part of a three-part documentary by the BBC broadcast on BBC ONE ''The Story of the Guitar''. Chicago, Illinois Flight 706 was on a routine flight from Milwaukee to Miami, with stops in Chicago, Tampa, and Ft. Lauderdale. While departing from Chicago, the plane banked to the right and gradually descended until hitting the ground. The cause of the crash was mechanical failure in the ailerons 37 upright thumb 100px US stamp issued on Leif Erikson Day, 1968. (File:LeifErikson1968stamp.jpg) Stories of Leif's journey to North America had a profound effect on the identity and self-perception of later Nordic Americans (Scandinavian American) and Nordic immigrants to the United States. The first statue of Leif (by Anne Whitney) Forbes, Alan and Ralph M. Eastman, ‘’Some Statues of Boston: Reproductions of some of the statues for which Boston is famous, with information concerning the personalities and events memorialized’’, State Street Trust Company, Boston MA 1946 and Forbes, Alan and Ralph M. Eastman, ''Other Statues of Boston'', State Street Trust Company, Boston MA 1947. was erected in Boston in 1887, as many believed that Vinland could have been located at Cape Cod; not long after, another casting of Whitney's statue (Leif, the Discoverer (Whitney)) was erected in Milwaukee. Buck, Diane M and Virginia A Palmer ''Outdoor Sculpture in Milwaukee: A Cultural and Historical Guidebook'', The State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison 1995 pp. 9 - 12. A statue was also erected in Chicago in 1901, having been originally commissioned for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition to coincide with the arrival of a reconstructed Viking ship from Bergen, Norway. Another work of art made for the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition, the painting ''Leiv Eiriksson oppdager Amerika'' by Christian Krohg, was in the possession of a Leif Erikson Memorial Association in Chicago before being given back to the National Gallery of Norway in 1900. WikiPedia:Milwaukee Dmoz:Regional North America United States Wisconsin Localities M Milwaukee commons:Milwaukee, Wisconsin


Austin, Texas

Canaanite, Luciferian, Babylon mystery religion ceremony." The Grove and Jones' investigation were covered by Jon Ronson in Channel 4's four-part documentary, ''Secret Rulers of the World''. Ronson documented his view of the ritual in his book, ''Them: Adventures With Extremists'', writing "My lasting impression was of an all-pervading sense of immaturity: the Elvis impersonators, the pseudo-pagan spooky rituals, the heavy drinking. These people might have


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