Places Known For

part based


Komárom

at the confluence of the Danube and the Váh rivers. Komárno was formed from part of a historical town in Hungary situated on both banks of the Danube. Following World War I, the border of the newly created Czechoslovakia cut the historical, unified town in half, creating two new towns. The smaller part, based on the former suburb of Újszőny, is in present-day Hungary as Komárom (the historical Hungarian town had the same name). Komárno and Komárom are connected by the Elizabeth


Zinder

into modern Nigeria. In the 18th century, Fula (Fula people) pastoralists moved into the Liptako area of the west, while smaller Zarma kingdoms, siding with various Hausa (Hausa people) states, clashed with the expanding Fulani Empire of Sokoto from the south. The colonial border with British Nigeria was in part based on the rupture between the Sokoto Caliphate to the south, and Hausa ruling dynasties which had fled to the north. In the far east around the Lake Chad basin, the successive expansion of the Kanem Empire and Bornu Empire spread ethnically Kanuri (Kanuri people) and Toubou rulers and their subject states as far west as Zinder and the Kaouar Oases from the 10th to the 17th centuries. Road Road transport, especially shared taxis, buses, and trucks, are the primary form of long distance transport for most Nigeriens. There were 10,100 km of roads in the nation in 1996, but only 798 km were paved. Most of this total was in large cities and in two main highways. The first major paved highway was constructed in the 1970s and 80s to transport uranium from the far northern mining town of Arlit to the Benin border. (Much of Niger's export economy relies upon ports in Cotonou, Lomé, and Port Harcourt.) This road, dubbed the ''Uranium Highway'' runs through Arlit, Agadez, Tahoua, Birnin-Konni, and Niamey, and is part of the Trans-Sahara Highway system. The paved '''RN1''' ("Routes Nationale") runs east-west across the south of the nation, from Niamey via Maradi and Zinder towards Diffa in the far east of the nation, although the stretch from Zinder to Diffa is only partially paved. Other roads range from all-weather laterite surfaces to grated dirt or sand pistes, especially in the desert north. These form a more extensive numbered highway system. In June 2008, the government transferred the Agadem block rights to CNPC. Niger announced that in exchange for the US$5 billion investment, the Chinese company would build wells, 11 of which would open by 2012, a wikipedia:Zinder


Sokoto

'''Sir Ahmadu Bello''' (June 12, 1910 – January 15, 1966) was a Nigerian politician, and was the first premier of the Northern Nigeria region from 1954-1966. He was the Sardauna of Sokoto and one of the prominent leaders in Northern Nigeria alongside Abubakar Tafawa Balewa, both of whom were prominent in negotiations about the region's place in an independent Nigeria. As leader of the Northern People's Congress, he dominated Nigerian politics throughout the early Nigerian Federation and the First Nigerian Republic. His assassination in a coup on January 15, 1966 ultimately precipitated into the Nigerian civil war. Early life He was born in Rabbah, Sokoto State. The son of a district head and heir to the Sokoto Caliphate, his great-grandfather was Sultan Bello, the founder of Sokoto and son of the revered Shaykh Usman Dan Fodio. Ahmadu Bello received his education first at the Sokoto Provincial School, the only modern school at the time in the Sokoto province. Then, he proceeded to the Katsina Teacher's Training College. After spending five years at Katsina, he was appointed by the Sultan to become a teacher at the Sokoto Middle School, his former school which had undergone rapid transformation. In 1934, he was made the district head of Rabbah, four years later, he was promoted and sent to Gusau to become a divisional head. In 1938, he made an unsuccessful bid to become the new Sultan of Sokoto. The successful sultan immediately conferred upon Sir Ahmadu Bello the traditional, now honorary, title of '''Sarduna''', alternatively spelled '''Sardauna''', and elevated him to the Sokoto Native Authority Council. In 1948, he was offered a scholarship to study local government administration in England. Ahmadu Bello took the scholarship sensing he needed to shore up his knowledge about the process of governance. Early life He was born in Rabbah, Sokoto State. The son of a district head and heir to the Sokoto Caliphate, his great-grandfather was Sultan Bello, the founder of Sokoto and son of the revered Shaykh Usman Dan Fodio. Ahmadu Bello received his education first at the Sokoto Provincial School, the only modern school at the time in the Sokoto province. Then, he proceeded to the Katsina Teacher's Training College. After spending five years at Katsina, he was appointed by the Sultan to become a teacher at the Sokoto Middle School, his former school which had undergone rapid transformation. In 1934, he was made the district head of Rabbah, four years later, he was promoted and sent to Gusau to become a divisional head. In 1938, he made an unsuccessful bid to become the new Sultan of Sokoto. The successful sultan immediately conferred upon Sir Ahmadu Bello the traditional, now honorary, title of '''Sarduna''', alternatively spelled '''Sardauna''', and elevated him to the Sokoto Native Authority Council. In 1948, he was offered a scholarship to study local government administration in England. Ahmadu Bello took the scholarship sensing he needed to shore up his knowledge about the process of governance. Successor to be decided Within the next couple of days, the kingmakers will assemble and draw up a list of three possible candidates to be the next Sultan Sultan. This list is then presented to Sokoto (w:Sokoto) State Governor Attahiru Bafarawa (w:Attahiru Bafarawa), who will choose the next Sultan from the list of three. He is expected to choose the person who is placed at the top of the list. The list from the Kingmakers could come as early as Tuesday, and a decision by the State Governor by the end of the week.


NKVD

Evidently, arrests were arbitrary and in part based on denunciations. ref name Weber99 >

Evidently, arrests were arbitrary and in part based on denunciations


Tangier

left the convent to marry D. Luís de Silva, captain of Tangier, while the broken-hearted Cristóvão told his sad story in some beautiful lyrics and particularly in the eclogue ''Chrisfal''. During the 16th and 17th centuries, horses moved continually between Spain and Portugal, and horses from the studs of Andalusia were used to improve the Portuguese cavalry. Portugal's successful restoration war (Portuguese Restoration War) against Spain (1640–1668) was in part based on mounted


East Germany

nid 660374 1dqc2hs swr2-wissen-20100507.pdf title Die Lüge vom Werwolf. Warum Tausende Jugendliche in sowjetischen Lagern landeten last Fruth first Pia date 7 May 2010 work Südwestdeutscher Rundfunk 2 language German accessdate 16 May 2010 Evidently, arrests were arbitrary and in part based on denunciations. The arrested boys were either "shot at dawn" or interned in NKVD special camps. ref name


Alexandria

a water wheel ( Wikipedia:Alexandria Dmoz:Regional Africa Egypt Localities Alexandria commons:الإسكندرية


Czechoslovakia

banks of the Danube. Following World War I, the border of the newly created Czechoslovakia cut the historical, unified town in half, creating two new towns. The smaller part, based on the former suburb of Újszőny, is in present-day Hungary as Komárom (the historical Hungarian town had the same name). Komárno and Komárom are connected by the Elizabeth bridge, which used to be a border crossing between Slovakia and Hungary until border checks were lifted due to the Schengen Area rules. With the disintegration of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy after World War I, Komárom found itself under new rule. The forming of Czechoslovakia, whose natural border in the south became the Danube River, separated Komárom from its southern half. In 1919 (confirmed by the Treaty of Trianon in 1920), the territory to the north of the Danube was ceded to Czechoslovakia with the territory to the south of the Danube remaining in Hungary. The town on the northern shore was renamed to Komárno (today the Slovak name of the town), and in 1923 it was reduced from a county seat to a district seat. Although this resulted in a dramatic change in the national composition of Komárno, the majority remained Hungarian. The town was also a foremost center of innovation in mining industry. In 1627, gun powder was used here for the first time in the world in a mine. To drain water from the flooded mines, a sophisticated system of water reservoirs and channels, known as tajchy, was designed and built by the local scientists Jozef Karol Hell, Maximilian Hell, and Samuel Mikovíny in the 18th century. Tajchy not only saved the mines from being closed, but also provided energy for the early industrialization. In 1735, the '''first mining school in the Kingdom of Hungary''' was founded there by Samuel Mikovíny. In the years 1762-1770, the Hofkammer in Vienna, with support from Queen Maria Theresa (Maria Theresa of Austria), transformed the school into the famous '''Mining Academy''', creating the '''first technical university in the world'''. Slovakia in the UNESCO Treasury - Banská Štiavnica In 1919, after the creation of Czechoslovakia, the Academy was moved to Sopron in Hungary. The student traditions of the Academy are still living in the "successors": University of Miskolc, and colleges in Sopron, Székesfehérvár, and Dunaújváros. In 1918 (confirmed by the Treaty of Trianon 1920), most of the county became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, except 7,5% of its area (around Putnok), which became temporarily part of the Hungarian county Borsod-Gömör-Kishont (presently part of Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén). The Czechoslovakian part of the county was part of the Slovak Land (''Slovenská krajina zem''). During World War II, when Czechoslovakia was split temporarily, most of the county became part of Hungary under the First Vienna Award, and the Gömör-Kishont County was recreated. This situation lasted until the end of the war, when 92.5% of the area became part of Czechoslovakia again. Today in Hungary the name of Gömör Gemer preserved only in the name of a small village, Gömörszőlős and in that of Gömöri station (Gömöri Railway Station), the smaller railway station of Miskolc. Since 1993, when Czechoslovakia was split, Gemer and Malohont are part of Slovakia, Banská Bystrica Region. Spiš after the creation of Czechoslovakia In 1918 (and confirmed by the Treaty of Trianon in 1920), the county became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia. A tiny part of the territory (situated in today's Poland below the Rysy), amounting to 195 km² after an internal border dispute had been confirmed to be part of Galicia (Central Europe) (at that time the western part of Austria-Hungary) as early as 1902. After World War I northern Spiš was united with Poland and became the subject of a long-running border dispute between Poland and Czechoslovakia. (See separate article, Czechoslovak-Polish border dispute (1918-1947)). In 1923 Slovak Spiš was divided between the newly formed Sub-Tatra county (''Podtatranská župa'') and Košice county (''Коšická župa''). In 1928-1939 and 1945-1948 it was part of the newly created Slovak Land (''Slovenská krajina''). History Liptó county as a Hungarian comitatus (Comitatus (Kingdom of Hungary)) arose before the 15th century. In the aftermath of World War I, the area became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, as recognized by the concerned states in the 1920 Treaty of Trianon. History Zemplén was one of the oldest counties of the Kingdom of Hungary. In the aftermath of World War I, the northern part of Zemplén county became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, as recognized by the concerned states in the 1920 Treaty of Trianon. The southern half (including the bigger part of the divided Sátoraljaújhely) stayed in Hungary as the county Zemplén. Following the provisions of the controversial First Vienna Award, an additional part came under Hungarian control in November 1938. The Trianon borders were restored after World War II. '''Hont''' (-Hungarian (Hungarian language) and Slovak (Slovak language) and German (German language), in Latin: ''Honthum'', in Hungarian also: ''Honth'') is the name of a historic administrative county (comitatus (Comitatus (Kingdom of Hungary))) of the Kingdom of Hungary and then shortly of Czechoslovakia. Its territory is presently in southern Slovakia (3 4) and northern Hungary (1 4). In Czechoslovakia, the county continued to exist as the Hont county (''Hontianska župa''). In 1923, it became part of the Zvolen county. In 1928, it became part of the newly created Slovak Land (''Slovenská krajina zem''). Following the provisions of the controversial First Vienna Award, the southern part of Czechoslovak Hont came under Hungarian control in November 1938. The remaining northern part became part of the newly created Hron county (1940–1945) of Slovakia. After World War II, the Trianon borders were restored. In 1949, it became part of the newly created Nitra region and Banská Bystrica region of Czechoslovakia. In 1960, it became part of the newly created Western Slovak region and Central Slovak region. In 1993, Czechoslovakia was split and in 1996 Hont became part of the newly created Nitra region and Banská Bystrica region of Slovakia. During World War II, when Czechoslovakia was temporarily split, most of the Czechoslovak part of the county was returned to Hungary under the First Vienna Award, and added to the county Abaúj-Torna, with capital Košice. After World War II, the pre-war border was restored. Fastest_lap 1:49.770 The '''Czechoslovakian Grand Prix''' (Czech: Velká cena Československa) was a Grand Prix motor racing event first held on September 28, 1930 at the Masaryk Circuit now referred to as the Brno Circuit. It was held in the town of Brno in Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic). History The county arose in the 11th century. The southern part of this county was occupied by Ottoman Empire between 1663 and 1685 and managed as Uyvar (Nové Zámky) eyalet (Subdivisions_of_the_Ottoman_Empire#Eyalets_established_1609–1683) by her. In the aftermath of World War I, the area became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, as recognized by the concerned states in the 1920 Treaty of Trianon. After World War II, the Trianon borders were restored and the area was completely in Czechoslovakia again. In 1993, Czechoslovakia was split and Tekov became part of Slovakia. After World War II, the Trianon borders were restored and the area was completely in Czechoslovakia again. In 1993, Czechoslovakia was split and Tekov became part of Slovakia. right 200px thumb Coat of Arms of Turóc (File:Turiec.jpg) Turóc county as a Hungarian comitatus (Comitatus (Kingdom of Hungary)) arose before the 15th century. In the aftermath of World War I, the area of the now defunct Turóc county became part of newly formed Czechoslovakia, as recognized by the concerned states in the 1920 Treaty of Trianon. The territory of the county is now part of Slovakia.


Slovakia

the historical, unified town in half, creating two new towns. The smaller part, based on the former suburb of Újszőny, is in present-day Hungary as Komárom (the historical Hungarian town had the same name). Komárno and Komárom are connected by the Elizabeth bridge, which used to be a border crossing between Slovakia and Hungary until border checks were lifted due to the Schengen Area rules. '''Banská Štiavnica''' ( Commons:Category:Slovakia WikiPedia:Slovakia Dmoz:Regional Europe Slovakia eo:Slovakio


Syria

Libyan desert. The modern borders of Egypt, therefore, are not a creation of European powers, and are at least in part based on historically definable entities which are in turn based on certain cultural and ethnic identifications. In 972 he turned against the Abbasid empire and its vassals, beginning with an invasion of Upper Mesopotamia. A second campaign, in 975, was aimed at Syria, where John's forces took Emesa, Baalbek, Damascus, Tiberias, Nazareth


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