Places Known For

nearby stone


Baalbek

of stones which are still in the order of 350 t. In the quarry nearby, two Roman building blocks (Stone of the Pregnant Woman), which were intended for the same podium, even surpass 1,000 t, lying there unused since their extraction in ancient times. Wikipedia:Baalbek Commons:Baalbek


Fort Collins, Colorado

at the nearby stone quarries (quarry) in the area. The Union Pacific Railroad invested in quarrying operation in the valley around the town, and at one time built a spur of their rail line from Fort Collins up to the town in to transport stone for its own use. The town was abandoned in 1949 to make way for the inundation of the valley by Horsetooth Reservoir as part of the Colorado-Big Thompson Project. Some of the former town site is located under the southern end of the reservoir


Works Progress Administration

Bowman's Hill and nearby stone fences. Quarries in Lumberville, Pennsylvania and Lawrenceville, New Jersey provided cut stone to be used for the sills and balustrades. Over 2,400 tons of materials were used in its construction, including; 1,200 perch (perch (volume)) of stone, 517 tons of sand and 225 tons of cement. In order to provide a solid foundation for the tower, the base was excavated 15 feet (4.57&nbsp


Lebanon

. The supporting stone layer beneath features a number of stones which are still in the order of 350 t. In the quarry nearby, two Roman building blocks (Stone of the Pregnant Woman), which were intended for the same podium, even surpass 1,000 t, lying there unused since their extraction in ancient times.


Jerusalem

reasons and due to the lack of a nearby stone pit, brick was chosen as building material. Construction began in 1468. Since the cash resources were exhausted in 1479 Pope Sixtus IV granted an indulgence. The two towers were completed in 1488 and the church was consecrated


United States

in the 1880s as a camp for workers at the nearby stone quarries (quarry) in the area. The Union Pacific Railroad invested in quarrying operation in the valley around the town, and at one time built a spur of their rail line from Fort Collins up to the town in to transport stone for its own use. The town was abandoned in 1949 to make way for the inundation of the valley by Horsetooth Reservoir as part of the Colorado-Big Thompson Project. Some of the former town site is located


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