Places Known For

metal production


Nizhny Tagil

in Sverdlovsk Oblast. One of the cornerstones of metal production in Russia, Tagil is also known for regular military exhibitions showcasing latest examples of arms and ammunition. While the city is in no way pretty, it has its own charm, vibrant atmosphere, and a bunch of interesting museums, as well as fine examples of Soviet architecture. Understand Nizhny Tagil stands at the confluence of the ''Vyya'' (Выя) and ''Tagil'' (Тагил) rivers on the eastern slopes of the Ural ridge. The city

-blown railway that was eventually commissioned in Saint Petersburg only few years later. In the second half of 19th century, the steelmaking was launched. The diverse metal production triggered the development of related crafts, such as ''tray painting''. Altogether, the 19th-century Nizhny Tagil was arguably the leading city of the Urals. The development of Tagil was seriously retarded at the turn of 20th century, when the old factories based on the serf's toil could not withstand rapid technological progress. The city got a new impetus only in 1930s, after the Soviet government commissioned the construction of new factories, the '''Nizhny Tagil Iron and Steel Plant''' (abbreviated as '''НТМК''') and '''Uralvagonzavod''' ('''УВЗ''', machine factory). These new factories were essential to support the Soviet army during WWII. They were also strongly reinforced by the plants evacuated from the west in 1941. Particularly, Uralvagonzavod, which was originally designed for manufacturing train cars (''vagony''), launched the ''production of tanks'' and remained one of the main tank manufacturers ever since. After 1945, the industrial area was extended by incorporating the third big factory, ''Uralkhimplast'' (production of plastic), and a plethora of smaller side plants manufacturing refractory materials, concrete, boilers and radiators, etc. The whole industrial area eventually exceeded the residential part of the city. Present-day Nizhny Tagil is not just a city standing next to the big industry. It is a city merged with the industry, which is tangible in the history and architecture, and even in the air: once you don't see the smoke, you sense the smell, and once the smell vanishes, the smoke re-appears. Many people deem Tagil an intimidating city, and you may even notice Russians (outside the Urals) using "Nizhny Tagil" as a synonym for an awful and disgusting place. This is in fact the wrongest attitude to be conceived. Nizhny Tagil is a unique place where you can stand on the hillock, which was once an important supply of iron ore, see the old factory (museum) at your feet, and the full-blown modern industry in a short distance. It is an absolutely genuine city that did not get any clean and fragrant enterprises to replace the hard-core and somewhat stinky industry. The essential basis of the Russian economy for nearly 300 years, this city can not be exactly pleasant: it is a bit gloomy, very stern, and nevertheless beguiling. Get in Get around See Do Buy Eat Drink Sleep * WikiPedia:Nizhny Tagil commons:Нижний Тагил


Cherepovets

Cherepovets' is the largest city in Vologda Oblast, founded in the 14th century as a monastery. Although not the administrative capital of Vologda Oblast', it certainly serves as the economic one solely due to the large company it hosts, OAO Severstal' (Northern Steel), which dominates the entire city. As a result of this company and its steel, Cherepovets has fared much better than most Russian cities and is therefore a bit more expensive than one would expect in a provincial Russian city of its size. Although there are not many sites to see in the city itself, it serves as a good base to see the many attractions of Vologda Oblast'. Get in The easiest and most inexpensive way to get to Cherepovets is by train from either St. Petersburg or Moscow. From St. Petersburg, the best option is the Vologda "Belye Nochi (White Nights)" Train 688я, which leaves at 22:40 and arrives at 6:18 the next day. There are also trains going to other locations, such as Arkhangelsk, Sverdlovsk, and Almaty which go through Cherepovets. From Moscow, there is only really one option, unless travelling to Vologda first, which can be quite difficult. That option is the Moscow - Cherepovets train, which leaves at 21:05 daily, and arrives at 08:35 the next day. Both trains are "firmenny" or of better quality. Like on most trains, there are "Platskart" (open sleeper car), "Kupe" (closed compartment car), and a couple of forms of "Lyuks" (Deluxe cars). Full train schedules can be seen on (in Russian). By air, the only company serving Cherepovets is Severstal' Airlines (in Russian). They have flights from Moscow (Vnukovo) daily, some flights from Domodedovo airport in Moscow, and occasionally flights to from St. Petersburg, Penza and Sochi, Petrozavodsk, and Helsinki. With enough plannign and if you know how to work with Russian travel agents, then you can find reasonbly priced flights. Get around Taxis are by far the most convenient way to travel around Cherepovets. Depending on how far you want to go, prices range from 60 - 90 RUR per trip. From the train station the prices are a bit higher. What is nice is that the prices are set and are determined


Fushun

and Yongling Tomb are now preserved as tourist attractions and are UNESCO world heritage sites. In the early 20th century, the area came under first Russian and then Japanese control. Fushun was developed as a major coal mining and heavy industrial area. This city was called 'Coal Capital of China'. Fushun was also the site of China's first non-ferrous metal production plant - Fushun Aluminium Plant. During the 1980's, a significant petrochemical industry was developed. It is now the largest


Sverdlovsk Oblast

center of Serovsky District, although it is not administratively a part of it. Population: In 1926, Nadezhdinsk was granted town status. In the 1930s, the ferrous metal production in Nadezhdinsk was expanded and diversified. In 1934, the town was renamed '''Kabakovsk''', after I. D. Kabakov, the leader of the Bolshevik Party in Sverdlovsk Oblast. In 1937 Kabakov was dismissed as a result of Joseph Stalin


Bethlehem, Pennsylvania

and World War II, including the manufacture of 1,100 warships. After roughly 140 years of metal production at its Bethlehem plant, Bethlehem Steel ceased operations there in 1995, in the face of overseas competition and declining demand. On December 7, 1937, at a grand ceremony during the Great Depression, Mrs. Marion Brown Grace pulled a large switch to turn on the new Christmas street lights and a large wooden

, Pennsylvania , based on land formerly owned by Bethlehem Steel. The company discontinued its steelmaking activities at the main Bethlehem plant in 1995 after about 140 years of metal production. With the closing of its local operations, Bethlehem Steel decided to help redevelop the South Side of Bethlehem, and hired outside consultants to develop concept plans on the reuse of the property. The plan was to rename the site "Bethlehem Works" and to use the land for cultural, recreational, educational, entertainment and retail development - including the Smithsonian Institution - an educational and research institution. Reading, Pennsylvania An outlying UHF station (rimshot (broadcasting)) which barely reaches Philadelphia despite applying for ever-increasing amounts of power, WTVE was near-bankrupt. Instead of building one main digital transmitter, WTVE is instead constructing a distributed transmission system composed nominally of eight co-channel transmitters in Reading (Reading, Pennsylvania), Bethlehem (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania), North East MD (North East, Maryland), Quarryville (Quarryville, Pennsylvania), Myerstown (Myerstown, Pennsylvania), Lambertville (Lambertville, New Jersey), Philadelphia (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) and Brockton (Brockton, Massachusetts) for a combined total of 136.67kW (kilowatt) of digital TV. As the bulk of this power (126 kW) is assigned to the Philadelphia transmitter site alone, effectively this configuration is a full-power Philadelphia station with a series of small low-power on-channel boosters (broadcast translator) covering the original service area and city of license. (Reading itself will get 760 watts.) - - '''W07DC-D''' 7 Allentown (Allentown, Pennsylvania) Bethlehem (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania) (Philadelphia (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) market) near South Mountain in Mountainville section of Allentown - From the Lehigh Gap, the river flows southeast to Allentown (Allentown, Pennsylvania), where it is joined by Little Lehigh Creek, then northeast past Bethlehem (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania), where it joins the Delaware River in Easton (Easton, Pennsylvania), along Pennsylvania's border with New Jersey. *Milton S. Hershey—Derry Church (Hershey (Hershey, Pennsylvania)) *Alfred Hunt (Alfred Hunt (steel magnate))—Bethlehem (Bethlehem, Pennsylvania), Brownsville (Brownsville, Pennsylvania) and Philadelphia *Lee Iacocca—Allentown (Allentown, Pennsylvania) Manslaughter charges On February 14, 2002, 55-year-old limousine driver Costas "Gus" Christofi was shot to death at Williams's estate in Alexandria Township, New Jersey. Hanley, Robert. "Reporter's Notebook; At Former Nets Star's Trial, A Tangle of Contradictions", ''The New York Times'', February 29, 2004. Accessed December 20, 2007. "Five friends and four Harlem Globetrotters were in various parts of Jayson Williams's country home in Alexandria Township, N.J., when a chauffeur, Costas Christofi, was killed two years ago by a blast from a shotgun held by Mr. Williams." Christofi had been hired to drive Williams's NBA charity team from a Bethlehem, Pennsylvania event to his mansion, about '''Bethlehem Hungarian''' was an American soccer club based in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania that was a member of the American Soccer League.


Austrian Empire

Republic , the West Ukrainian People's Republic, and numerous Bolshevik revkoms (Ukrainian SSR). The Thirty Years' War brought new hardship, but under the Bourbons, Haute-Marne suffered relatively little. It had valleys with rich soils, plentiful supplies of wood for construction, iron for metal production, and a growing wine industry. There were Jesuit colleges in Langres and Chaumont. -- In March 1814 the departmental prefecture (Prefectures in France), Chaumont, was the unwitting witness to the end of the First Empire (First French Empire). On 1 March, Prussia, Russia (Russian Empire), the United Kingdom and Austria (Austrian Empire) signed an accord forbidding any individual peace deal with Napoleon I (Napoleon I of France), and to fight until his final defeat. Early years He was born George Leslie Goebel in Chicago, Illinois, TCM Overview His father, Hermann Goebel, was a butcher and grocer who had emigrated to the United States with his parents in the 1890s from the Austrian Empire. His mother, Lillian (MacDonald) Goebel, was born in Illinois to immigrant parents from Scotland. He was an only child. 1920 census, Chicago, Cook Co., Illinois, enumeration district 1640, sheet 5B History Through the history, territory of present-day Burgenland was part of the Roman Empire, the Hun Empire, the Kingdom of the Ostrogoths, the Italian (Italy) Kingdom of Odoacer, the Kingdom of the Lombards, the Avar Khaganate, the Slavic (Slavs) State of Samo, the Frankish Empire, Great Moravia, the Kingdom of Hungary, the Habsburg Monarchy, the Austrian Empire, Austria-Hungary, Austria, and the World War II German Empire. The Napoleonic and Austrian rule In 1797, most of the Venetian Republic was annexed to the Habsburg Empire, including Slavia Veneta. The Habsburg authorities abolished the ancient privileges of the local Slovene populations, as they had already done with a similar system of autonomy in neighboring Tolmin County (Tolmin) in 1717. In 1805, the region was submitted to the Napoleonic rule, which did not restore the privileges, but replaced the old boroughs with French-style townships, led by government-appointed mayors. The old legal system based on common law was replaced by the Code Napoleon. In 1813, the region fell again under Habsburg domain and in 1815 it was included in the Austrian (Austrian Empire) administrative unit of Lombardy-Venetia. Most of the reforms introduced by the French authorities were kept. In 1866, the region became part of Italy (Kingdom of Italy (1861-1946)) by a referendum, with the exception of the villages of Breginj and Livek which were included in the Austrian (Austria-Hungary) County of Gorizia and Gradisca (Gorizia and Gradisca). The white-blue-red Slovenian flag was first exposed on April 7, 1848, on a building between Congress Square and Prešeren Square in Ljubljana, by a group of nationally minded students led by the renowned national conservative activist and poet Lovro Toman. Despite opposition from the local Ethnic Germans it was subsequently recognized by the Austrian (Austrian Empire) Government as the official flag of Carniola. This formal recognition, albeit on a regional level, was an exception to the policy of the Austrian Government which tended to persecute national symbols of the non-German nationalities in the Empire (Austrian Empire). In addition, Austrian authorities saw all tricolours as basically nationalist and potentially revolutionary symbols, so Austrian provinces (as the Empire itself) were only allowed to use bicolour (Gallery of bicolor flags)s (the only exception being the flag of the Kingdom of Croatia and Slavonia, since it was interpreted to be a combination of the Croatian (Kingdom of Croatia (Habsburg)) and Slavonian (Kingdom of Slavonia) bicolours). So the official recognition of the Carniolan white-blue-red tricolour instead of the traditional white-blue bicolour was seen as a major achievement by the Slovenes and it quickly became the symbol representing the idea of United Slovenia. In the second half of the 19th century, the Slovenian national tricolour became the only truly all-Slovenian symbol, representing all Slovenes, regardless of the historical region in which they lived. The white-blue-red Slovenian flag was first exposed on April 7, 1848, on a building between Congress Square and Prešeren Square in Ljubljana, by a group of nationally minded students led by the renowned national conservative activist and poet Lovro Toman. Despite opposition from the local Ethnic Germans it was subsequently recognized by the Austrian (Austrian Empire) Government as the official flag of Carniola. This formal recognition, albeit on a regional level, was an exception to the policy of the Austrian Government which tended to persecute national symbols of the non-German nationalities in the Empire (Austrian Empire). In addition, Austrian authorities saw all tricolours as basically nationalist and potentially revolutionary symbols, so Austrian provinces (as the Empire itself) were only allowed to use bicolour (Gallery of bicolor flags)s (the only exception being the flag of the Kingdom of Croatia and Slavonia, since it was interpreted to be a combination of the Croatian (Kingdom of Croatia (Habsburg)) and Slavonian (Kingdom of Slavonia) bicolours). So the official recognition of the Carniolan white-blue-red tricolour instead of the traditional white-blue bicolour was seen as a major achievement by the Slovenes and it quickly became the symbol representing the idea of United Slovenia. In the second half of the 19th century, the Slovenian national tricolour became the only truly all-Slovenian symbol, representing all Slovenes, regardless of the historical region in which they lived. After 1814, Vicenza passed to the Austrian Empire. In 1848, however, the populace rose against Austria, more violently then in any other Italian centre apart from Milan and Brescia (the city would receive the highest award for military valour for the courage displayed by revolutionaries in this period). As a part of the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia, it was annexed to Italy (unification of Italy) after the 3rd war of Italian independence (Austro-Prussian War). thumb 240px Participants in the 1920 games, with the nations in blue participating for the first time. (Image:1920 Olympic games countries.PNG) A total of 29 nations participated in the Antwerp Games, only one more than in 1912, as Germany, Austria, Hungary, Bulgaria and Turkey were not invited, having lost World War I. From the newly created European states, only Estonia took part, and Czechoslovakia, succeeding Bohemia which had sent athletes prior to World War I as part of the Austrian Empire. Poland was busy with the Polish-Soviet War and therefore was unable to form an Olympic team. Argentina, Finland, Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, Brazil, Monaco competed as nations at the Olympic Games for the first time. New Zealand, which had competed as part of a combined team with Australia in 1908 and 1912, competed on its own for the first time. The '''Battle of Austerlitz''', also known as the '''Battle of the Three Emperors''', was one of Napoleon's (Napoleon I of France) greatest victories, where the French Empire (First French Empire) effectively crushed the Third Coalition. On 2 December 1805 (20 November Old Style (Old Style and New Style dates), 11 Frimaire An XIV, in the French Republican Calendar), a French (French people) army, commanded by Emperor Napoleon I (Napoleon I of France), decisively defeated a Russo (Russian Empire)-Austrian (Austrian Empire) army, commanded by Tsar Alexander I (Alexander I of Russia) and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II (Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor), after nearly nine hours of difficult fighting. The battle took place near Austerlitz (Slavkov u Brna) (Slavkov u Brna) about 10 Km (6 mi) south-east of Brno in Moravia, at that time in the Austrian Empire (present day Czech Republic). The battle is often regarded as a tactical masterpiece. The '''Battle of Austerlitz''', also known as the '''Battle of the Three Emperors''', was one of Napoleon's (Napoleon I of France) greatest victories, where the French Empire (First French Empire) effectively crushed the Third Coalition. On 2 December 1805 (20 November Old Style (Old Style and New Style dates), 11 Frimaire An XIV, in the French Republican Calendar), a French (French people) army, commanded by Emperor Napoleon I (Napoleon I of France), decisively defeated a Russo (Russian Empire)-Austrian (Austrian Empire) army, commanded by Tsar Alexander I (Alexander I of Russia) and Holy Roman Emperor Francis II (Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor), after nearly nine hours of difficult fighting. The battle took place near Austerlitz (Slavkov u Brna) (Slavkov u Brna) about 10 Km (6 mi) south-east of Brno in Moravia, at that time in the Austrian Empire (present day Czech Republic). The battle is often regarded as a tactical masterpiece. The central factor which precipitated the intervention of the three Great Powers in the Greek conflict were Russia's ambitions to expand in the Black Sea region at the expense of the Ottoman Empire and her emotional support for the fellow-Orthodox Christian (Orthodox Christianity) Greeks, who had rebelled against their Ottoman overlords in 1821. As Russia's intentions in the region were seen as a major geostrategic (geostrategy) threat by the other powers, British and Austrian (Austrian Empire) diplomacy aimed at preventing Russian intervention in the hope that the Ottoman government would succeed in suppressing the rebellion. But in late 1825, the accession to the Russian throne of Tsar Nicholas I (Nicholas I of Russia), who adopted a more aggressive foreign policy, forced Britain (United Kingdom) to intervene, for fear that an unrestrained Russia would dismantle the Ottoman Empire altogether and establish Russian hegemony in Greece, the Balkans and the Near East. France joined the other two powers in order to restore her leading role in European affairs after her defeat in the Napoleonic Wars. The governments of all three powers were also under intense pressure from their philhellenic (philhellenism) home public opinion to help the Greeks, especially after the invasion of the Peloponnese in 1825 by Ottoman vassal Ibrahim Pasha of Egypt and the atrocities committed by his forces against the Greeks. birth_date


Papua New Guinea

operations are located around Australia, Indonesia, Ivory Coast, and Papua New Guinea. The Telfer Mine is a large open cut and underground mine in Western Australia. The mine has the potential to become the largest gold mine in Australia with expected average production of 800,000 ounces (25,000 kg) of gold per year. Ridgeway is a large underground mine being developed by Newcrest. In its first full year of operation and metal production of 377,539 ounces (11,742.8


Kazakhstan

Commons:Category:Kazakhstan WikiPedia:Kazakhstan Dmoz:Regional Asia Kazakhstan


Kenya

thumb right A traditional Swahili culture Swahili (File:Lamu door.jpg) carved wooden door in Lamu. The Kenyan coast had served host to communities of ironworkers and communities of Bantu subsistence farmers, hunters and fishers who supported the economy with agriculture, fishing, metal production and trade with foreign countries.


Hamburg

October 9, 2001 Recorded at Hansen Studio, Hamburg, Germany Genre Power metal Production * Mixed at: Hansen Studio, Hamburg, Germany * Engineered by: Dirk Schlächter, Kai Hansen From 1675 to 1689, Christian Albert lived in exile in Hamburg. However, with the aid of the Holy Roman Emperor and the European allies, he managed to force the Danish king to sign the so-called ''Altonaer Vergleich'', which allowed to him regain his former position. thumb left ''Allegory of salvation and sin'', 1596 (File:Vredeman de Vries Allegory.jpg) Born in Leeuwarden and raised in Friesland, in 1546 Vredeman de Vries went to Amsterdam and Kampen Commons:Category:Hamburg Wikipedia:Hamburg Dmoz:Regional Europe Germany States Hamburg


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