Places Known For

major focus


Salmon Arm

. A major focus of the novel is "to give an unflinching portrait of the caregiver, how very hard it is on the caregiver and on all family relationships." Canadian Living : Life : Community : Interview with author Gail Anderson-Dargatz * Osoyoos (Osoyoos, British Columbia) - CJOR (CJOR (AM)) * Salmon Arm - CKXR-FM * Revelstoke (Revelstoke, British Columbia) - CKCR-FM To the north-west it is fed by the Adams River (Adams River (British Columbia)), which drains Adams Lake. Shuswap Lake connects to Mara Lake at the Sicamous Channel. The Shuswap River connects via Mara Lake. In the south-west the Salmon River flows into the lake at Salmon Arm. The Eagle River (Eagle River (Shuswap)) runs down from the Eagle Pass (Eagle Pass (British Columbia)) in the Monashees to enter the lake at Sicamous, in the east. The Seymour River (Seymour River (Shuswap)) empties into the northern end of the Seymour Arm. In addition to these rivers, numerous creeks feed the lake, including Scotch Creek, which runs south to the north shore of the main arm, near the community of the same name. demo-cd Columbia-Shuswap Regional District demo-csd Salmon Arm, Enderby (Enderby, British Columbia), Armstrong (Armstrong, British Columbia), Spallumcheen (Spallumcheen, British Columbia), Sicamous (Sicamous, British Columbia) demo-cd demo-csd Vernon (Vernon, British Columbia), Armstrong (Armstrong, British Columbia), Coldstream (Coldstream, British Columbia), Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen (Spallumcheen, British Columbia), North Okanagan C (North Okanagan C, British Columbia), North Okanagan F (North Okanagan F, British Columbia), Columbia-Shuswap C (Columbia-Shuswap C, British Columbia), Columbia-Shuswap D (Columbia-Shuswap D, British Columbia), Thompson-Nicola P (Rivers and the Peaks) (Thompson-Nicola P (Rivers and the Peaks), British Columbia), North Okanagan–Shuswap consists of Subdivision C of Columbia-Shuswap Regional District, and the North Okanagan Regional District. This electoral district includes the towns of Salmon Arm, Vernon (Vernon, British Columbia), Coldstream (Coldstream, British Columbia), Lumby (Lumby, British Columbia) and Armstrong (Armstrong, British Columbia). '''South:''' Columbia-Shuswap D (Columbia-Shuswap D, British Columbia), Salmon Arm, North Bay 5 (North Bay 5, British Columbia) birth_date Wikipedia:Salmon Arm, British Columbia Dmoz:Regional North_America Canada British_Columbia Localities S Salmon_Arm


Gomel

as ''Belarusian Institute of Technology''. Upgraded to university level in 1993. Currently has 9 departments. *Minsk State Linguistic University. Specialised in foreign languages. Founded in 1948 as ''Minsk Institute for Foreign Languages''. In 2006 had 8 departments. Major focus on English, French, German and Spanish. The trolleybus system in Minsk (since 1952) is the second-largest in the world. Trolleybuses also work in Brest (Brest (Belarus)), Vitebsk


Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

was the Menomonee Valley (Menomonee Valley#Rejuvenation) in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where the agency evaluated potential health effects of contamination at the site and worked closely with developers and the city. Community partnerships A major focus of the work ATSDR does involves interacting with communities. ATSDR often establishes partnerships with state and local health departments to assist them with their public health duties. In 2008, ATSDR had cooperative agreements with 29 states and one tribal government, providing technical assistance to help those partners address local environmental health concerns. * Cleanup needed (updated by bot) ** 732 - 0-0-1-3, 2003 US Air Force Academy sexual assault scandal, 4Kids Entertainment, 67th Combat Support Hospital, 689th Radar Squadron, AM General, AN APQ-174, ANCHORY, Aaron Burr, Abercrombie & Fitch, Abraham Simpson, Abrams v. 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Ball, United States v. Booker, United States v. Harris, University Channel, Unsigned Iowa State Highways, Use of the word American, VF-31, Varney Airlines, Vernon L. Smith, Veterans' truth project, Vets For Freedom, Vietnam Syndrome, Vincente Minnelli, W. Edwards Deming, Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska, Wall Street Crash of 1929, Walter A. Coslet, War Powers Act, Ward Kimball, Ward Weaver III, Washington Assessment of Student Learning, Wednesdays in Mississippi, West Memphis 3, Westminster, Colorado, Westwood Hills, Kansas, Whistle stop train tour, White Order of Thule, White people, Whitney Young High School, William H. Pitsenbarger, Williams Traditional Magnet Elementary School, World War II atrocities in Poland, YouthQuake, Zabdiel Adams, Zavala County, Texas * Expansion needed (updated by bot)


Bahawalpur


Dera Ghazi Khan


Sakha Republic

Republic Mirny , Neryungri, Pokrovsk (Pokrovsk, Sakha Republic), and Udachny. The diamond, gold and tin ore mining industries are the major focus of the economy. Uranium ore is beginning to be mined. Turkic-language Sakha are in politics, government, finance, economy and cattle-breeding (horses and cows for milk and meat). The Paleoasian indigenous peoples are hunters, fishermen, and reindeer herders. As of 2008, Sakha Republic is the 19th most developed federal subject in Russia. Transportation Water transport ranks first for cargo turnover. There are six river ports, two sea ports (Tiksi and Zelyony Mys). Four shipping companies, including the ''Arctic Sea Shipping Company'', operate in the republic. The republic's main waterway is the Lena River, which links Yakutsk with the rail station of Ust-Kut in Irkutsk Oblast. Air transport is the most important for transporting people. Airlines connect the republic with most regions of Russia. Yakutsk Airport has an international terminal. Two federal roads pass the republic. They are Yakutsk–Skovorodino (Skovorodino, Amur Oblast) (M56 Lena highway (M56 Lena highway (Russia))) and Yakutsk–Magadan (M56 Kolyma Highway). However, due to the presence of permafrost, use of asphalt is not practical, and therefore the roads are made of clay. When heavy rains blow over the region, the roads often turn to mud, sometimes stranding hundreds of travellers in the process. EnglishRussia.com – ''Russian Roads'' The Berkakit–Tommot railroad is currently in operation. It links the Baikal Amur Mainline with the industrial centers in South Yakutia. Construction of the Amur Yakutsk Mainline continues northward; the railway was completed to Nizhny Bestyakh, across the river from Yakutsk, in 2013. Education The most important facilities of higher education include North-Eastern Federal University (previously Yakutsk State University) and Yakutsk State Agricultural Academy. Culture thumb Yakut dance with traditional clothing. (File:Ohuokhai.jpeg) The cultural life of Yakutsk is constantly developing. There are many places worth visiting. These include: the State Russian drama theatre named after A. S. Pushkin; the Sakha Theater named after P. A. Oiyunsky; the State Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre named after D. K. Sivtsev; and Suorun Omoloon, Young Spectator's Theatre. There are a number of interesting museums as well. These include the National Fine Arts Museum of Sakha, the Museum of Local Lore and History named after E. Yaroslavsky, and the Khomus Museum and Museum of Permafrost. National days *27 April — Republic Day *21 June — Ysyakh festival See also *Cuisine of Sakha *Lena Pillars * List of rural localities in the Sakha Republic * Music in the Sakha Republic Notes ; (March 2, 1908 - May 28, 1968), was a Soviet (Soviet Union) sniper during World War II, credited with as many as 429 kills. He was born in the village of Krest-Khaldzhay of what is now Tomponsky Ulus of the Sakha Republic, Russian Federation.


Wikipedia:Teahouse/Questions/Archive 1

on this website?" 1) Wikipedia is an encyclopedia, not a fancy MySpace dance floor, and 2) It's a big drain on the servers, 3) you probably have seen a number of complicated things and just not realized how complex they are, such as the ancestry chart for the famous Cleopatra (Cleopatra_VII#Ancestry). The software that runs Wikipedia is continually being optimized behind the scenes to support the large load placed on it by templates and parsers. That was the major focus of the last big update. I don't want to beat a dead horse, but it's complex because wiki language is as powerful as a moon rocket (Saturn V) -- and these complex tools are literally open to everyone to use (you don't even need an account). :) Banaticus (User:Banaticus) (talk (User talk:Banaticus)) 09:39, 9 March 2012 (UTC) Slideshow In Creole How can I create a slideshow of images in Wiki Mark up language? --Tito Dutta (User:Titodutta) (Send me a message) (User_talk:Titodutta) 20:25, 7 March 2012 (UTC) :Hello Tito! I'm a little confused on your question. I'm assuming you're asking to create a image gallery for a list of images to combine images. You can look at Wikipedia:Gallery tag for help creating a gallery. Basically, you can build off this example gallery: File:Wiki.png File:Wiki.png Captioned File:Wiki.png File:Wiki.png Links (Help:Contents Links) can be put in captions. File:Wiki.png File:Wiki.png Full MediaWiki syntax may now be used… Hope this helps! -- ''' Luke (User:LuK3) (Talk) (User_talk:LuK3)''' 01:35, 8 March 2012 (UTC) :You can't create a moving slideshow of images on Wikipedia, but you can create an animated GIF (Graphics Interchange Format) image. Most big 3rd party web editors can create one. A Google search will help you find some free programs to try out. We don't have a Wikipedia article on creating gif images -- someone should write one (maybe you)? If you do, let me know on my talk page (User talk:Banaticus) please. :) Banaticus (User:Banaticus) (talk (User talk:Banaticus)) 09:48, 9 March 2012 (UTC) Coffee Shop in Wikipedia? thumb right I'm being bold, and serving up double espressos today for our Teahouse friends who would prefer a coffee over tea. Enjoy! -- User:Rosiestep Rosiestep (File:Linea doubleespresso.jpg) (talk (User talk:Rosiestep)) 02:09, 9 March 2012 (UTC) Is there any coffee shop in Wikipedia? --Tito Dutta (User:Titodutta) (Send me a message) (User_talk:Titodutta) 20:23, 7 March 2012 (UTC) :Heh, I'm afraid not, though I'm sure you can get some coffee here. ItsZippy (User:ItsZippy) (talk (User Talk:ItsZippy) • contributions (Special:Contributions ItsZippy)) 20:56, 7 March 2012 (UTC) ::Hi. If we're out of coffee, you'll have to settle for a tea or perhaps a glass of milk or water. I hope that's OK! . -- Trevj (User:Trevj#top) (talk (User talk:Trevj#top)) 11:52, 4 March 2012 (UTC) ::::Thank you all! These are all really helpful suggestions, and I will try them all out. Mel290 (User:Mel290) (talk (User talk:Mel290)) 21:39, 5 March 2012 (UTC) :::::Another option is to check out a WikiProject you might be interested in. WikiProjects consist of groups of editors who edit articles on specific topics; for example, Wikipedia:WikiProject Computing (see a list of WikiProjects here (Wikipedia:WikiProject Council Directory)). There are often to-do lists on these project pages; for WikiProject Computing, see Wikipedia:WikiProject Computing Tasks Expand stubs. WikiProjects are also a great way to find editors with common interests. Inverse Hypercube (User:InverseHypercube) 04:51, 6 March 2012 (UTC) upload a photograph User Wil0717 received a Teahouse email and responded with a question which I thought others might be asking too so hoping we could respond here... "I need to know how to upload a photograph to support an entry I made on a wiki page." Thanks! Rosiestep (User:Rosiestep) (talk (User talk:Rosiestep)) 03:32, 14 March 2012 (UTC) :Hello Rosiestep! You can tell Wil0717 that there are three important documents to read regarding the uploading and use of images at Wikipedia: :*Wikipedia:Image use policy discusses when (and, more importantly when '''not''') to upload and use images at Wikipedia. It is very important, to prevent misunderstandings and certain heartache, that a person understands what images are and are not appropriate for uploading. :*Wikipedia:Uploading images discusses how to actually upload the image to Wikipedia. :*Wikipedia:Picture tutorial discusses how to insert and format images in articles. :Does that help, Rosiestep? -- Jayron (User:Jayron32)''''' 32 (User talk:Jayron32)''''' 04:40, 14 March 2012 (UTC) ::Thanks for the great answer, Jayron! --Rosiestep (User:Rosiestep) (talk (User talk:Rosiestep)) 05:05, 14 March 2012 (UTC)


Quetta

at the time Bush had planned to present it, in an attempt to quell civilian dissent. Dubai is a major focus city for the airline with flights to Bahawalpur, Dera Ghazi Khan, Faisalabad, Islamabad, Karachi, Lahore, Multan, Peshawar, Quetta and Sialkot. Hajj and Umrah operations PIA operates a two-month (pre- and post-) Hajj operation each year to and from Jeddah and sometimes Madinah in Saudi Arabia. PIA transports over 130,000 intending pilgrims each year from Karachi, Lahore, Islamabad, Peshawar, Quetta, Faisalabad, Multan, Sialkot, and Sukkur to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Saudi Arabia) with its fleet of Boeing 747-300 (Boeing 747) and Boeing 777-200ER (Boeing 777#777-200ER). Aided U.S. forces Mr. Noorzai was in Quetta when the September 11 attacks occurred, and soon afterwards returned to Afghanistan. In November 2001, he met with men he described as American military officials at Spinboldak, near the Afghan-Pakistani border. Small teams of U.S. Special Forces and intelligence officers were in Afghanistan at the time, seeking the support of tribal leaders (Afghani tribal leaders). According to his lawyer, Noorzai was taken to Kandahar, where he was detained and questioned for six days by the Americans about Taliban officials and operations. He agreed to work with them and was freed, and in late January 2002 he handed over 15 truckloads of weapons, including about 400 anti-aircraft missiles, that had been hidden by the Taliban in his tribe's territory Latest News - An Afghan's Path From Ally Of U.S. To Drug Suspect Mullah Nooruddin Turabi Minister of Justice * Allegedly sheltered in Quetta by Pakistani officials by the end of 2001; captured by United States forces and then set free and given general amnesty in early January 2002 US begins transferring terror prisoners to Cuban base: Gunfire errupts [sic] as plane with al-Qaida members takes off, ''Boston Globe'', January 10, 2002 High-Ranking Taliban Leaders Surrender, Are Set Free, ''Fox News'', January 9, 2002 - * '''Government House of Pakistan''' in Islamabad. * '''Government House of Baluchistan''' in Quetta, Baluchistan (Balochistan (Pakistan)). * '''Government House of North-West Frontier Province''' in Peshawar, N.W.F.P. Army career Zia was commissioned in the British Indian Army in a cavalry regiment on May 12, 1943 and served against Nazi Germany and its allies in World War II. After Pakistan gained its independence, Zia joined the newly formed Pakistan Army as a Major. His regiment was now the Guides Cavalry Frontier Force Regiment. He was trained in the United States in 1962–1964 at the US Army (United States Army) Command and General Staff College (United States Army Command and General Staff College) Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. After that, he returned to take over as Directing Staff (DS) at Command and Staff College, Quetta. A.H. Amin. "Interview with Brig (retd) Shamim Yasin Manto" ''Defence Journal'', February 2002 During the Indo-Pakistani War of 1965, Zia was a tank commander. The Consequences of Nuclear Proliferation: Lessons from South Asia By Devin T. Hagerty Published by MIT Press, 1998, ISBN 0-262-58161-2, pp 114 *In Karachi, Pakistan, an estimated 40,000 people protested against potential U.S. strikes on Afghanistan. Four protesters were killed and ten police officers were injured. Other protests in Peshawar (10,000 protesters), Quetta (3,000 protesters), and Islamabad (1,500 protesters) occurred without incident. * '''Monday, October 8''' - Protest rallies lead to three casualties in the Gaza Strip and one in Pakistan. Palestinian authorities shoot and kill two students, one a 13-year old. Crowds then ransack Palestinian police buildings. In Pakistan, protests take place in Islamabad, Peshawar, Lahore, Karachi, Quetta, and near the Khyber Pass border crossing. The most violent protests in Pakistan are in Quetta (60 miles from Afghan border), where one person is shot and killed, the central police station, United Nations buildings, and several shops and movie theaters are set on fire and looted, and a police subinspector is kidnapped. Ten thousand students at three universities protest without incident in Cairo, Egypt. In 1966, Zia was appointed military instructor at the Pakistan Military Academy, later going on to attend the prestigious Command and Staff College in Quetta, where he completed a course in command and tactical warfare. Advocating that the Pakistan Army make greater efforts to recruit and encourage Bengali military officers, Zia helped raise two Bengali battalions during his stint as instructor. Trained for high-ranking command posts, Zia joined the 2nd East Bengal regiment as its second-in-command at Joydevpur in 1969. Although sectarian tensions between East and West Pakistan were intensifying, Zia travelled to West Germany to receive advanced military and command training with the German Army. Afghanistan's classical singers include the late Ustad Mohammad Hussain Sarahang (1924-1983), who is one of the master singers of Patiala Gharana in North Indian classical music and is also well-known throughout India and Pakistan as a contemporary of Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan. His composition "Pai Ashk" was used in the theme song of the Hindi film ''Mera Saya''. Ubaidullah Jan Kandaharai (Ubaidullah Jan) is regarded as the king of Pashto music in the southern Afghanistan region. He died in the 1980s but his music is still very much enjoyed by the Pashtun diaspora around the world, mainly by the Pashtuns in the Kandahar (Kandahar Province)-Quetta regions. Other classical singers are Ustad Qasim, Ustad Rahim Bakhsh, and Ustad Nato. The commission set up eight regional offices in Jalalabad (Jalalabad, Afghanistan), Herat, Kunduz, Kabul, Gardez, Kandahar, Mazar and Bamyan (Bamyan, Afghanistan) as well as in the Pakistani cities of Peshawar and Quetta, and in the Iranian cities of Tehran and Mashhad. In 1825 Nott was promoted to the command of his regiment of native infantry; and in 1838, on the outbreak of the First Afghan war, he was appointed to the command of a brigade. From April to October 1839 he was in command of the troops left at Quetta, where he rendered valuable service. In November 1840 he captured Khelat, and in the following year compelled Akbar Khan and other tribal chiefs to submit to the British. The Rawalpindi Railway Station is located in the Saddar (Saddar, Rawalpindi). The Railway Station was built in the 1880s by the government of British India. The British built many railways across South Asia to help facilitate trade and more importantly to help consolidate their rule. The routes the British built from Rawalpindi, which contained a major military base, linked to Lahore, Karachi, Peshawar, Quetta, Multan, Faisalabad, Hyderabad, Sindh, Sukkur, Bahawalpur, Jhelum (Jhelum (city)), Gujrat, Gujranwala, Kohat, Khanewal, Nawabshah, Nowshera (Nowshera, Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa) and the Malakand Pass. Rawalpindi is on the ancient Grand Trunk Road (also known as G.T. Road or, more recently, N-5) which links Rawalpindi to nearly every major city in northern Pakistan, from Karachi, to Peshawar, Lahore, Quetta, Multan, Faisalabad, Hyderabad (Hyderabad, Sindh), Sukkur, Bahawalpur, Jhelum (Jhelum (City)), Gujrat, Gujranwala, Kohat, Khanewal, Nawabshah, Nowshera (Nowshera, Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa) and the Malakand Pass. In 1926, Slim was sent to the Indian Staff College (Command and Staff College) at Quetta. On 5 June 1929, he was appointed a General Staff Officer, Second Grade WikiPedia:Quetta Dmoz:Regional Asia Pakistan Provinces Balochistan Localities Quetta


Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission

CTV (CTV Television Network), the terrestrial broadcaster that holds the Canadian rights to the Super Bowl, has the right to invoke simultaneous substitution (to date, CTV and all networks that have held rights to the Super Bowl have invoked simultaneous substitution over every Super Bowl), blacking out all U.S. commercials on cable and satellite. Changing careers again, he became a moderator for the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) program ''Nightline'' from 1960 to 1963. From 1963 to 1968, he was a supervisor in the Department of Public Affairs (Radio & TV) at the CBC. From 1968 to 1969, he served as the Chief Consultant to the Canadian Radio Television Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission). Next, from 1968 to 1970, he was the Commissioner for the Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau's Task Force on Government Information. Canada's (Canada)'s regulatory Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) issued a policy order on July 21, 2009 requiring Canadian telecommunication (List of Canadian telephone companies), wireless service (List of Canadian mobile phone companies), and VoIP providers to implement IP-based (Internet Protocol) text relay services by July 21, 2010, and also delaying a decision on the national provision of video relay services in both official languages (ASL & LSQ) for three years. Family Network for Deaf Children Newsletter, Family Network for Deaf Children, Burnaby, B.C., Fall 2009, pg.11. Retrieved from FNDC.ca website March 6, 2010. CRTC. Broadcasting and Telecom Regulatory Policy CRTC 2009-430, Canadian Radio and Telecommunications Commission, Ottawa, July 21, 2009, file number: 8665-C12-200807943. Retrieved March 6, 2010. According to deaf-community organizations Canada is lagging far behind its neighbour, the United States, with respect to video relay service for the deaf, hard-of-hearing and deaf-blind. CAD. News and Events: CRTC Finally Approves Video Relay Service, Canadian Association of the Deaf, 2008. Retrieved March 8, 2010. WKNR's dominance was challenged when CKLW-AM got a makeover courtesy of Bill Drake and Paul Drew in April 1967. With 50,000 watts behind it and a lightning-fast pace based on Drake's "Boss Radio" model, The Big 8 became the number one Top 40 station in the region, and some of Keener's top DJs, including Dick Purtan and Scott Regen, would eventually move over to CKLW. However, WKNR did not go down without a fight, continuing to battle the Big 8 for five more years despite dropping ratings. During this time, the station attempted to distinguish itself from CKLW by playing less bubblegum pop and more rock album cuts, and promoting itself as "Rock and Roll The American Way" (a jab at CKLW's location in Windsor, Ontario, and Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission-mandated "Canadian content" regulations imposed at the start of 1971). Sister station WKNR-FM, which had previously simulcast the AM programming, switched to a more adventurous progressive rock (progressive rock (radio format)) format starting in 1969, followed by an MOR (Middle of the road (music)) "Stereo Island" format in 1971. :''For the original station "CKFI-AM", see CFOB-FM.'' '''CKFI-FM''' (97.1 FM (FM broadcasting), "Magic 97.1") is a radio station broadcasting an active rock format. Licensed to Swift Current, Saskatchewan, it serves southwestern Saskatchewan. It first began broadcasting in late 2005 after receiving approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) on February 3, 2005. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-37 The station is currently owned by Golden West Broadcasting. In 1988, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) renewed the network licence for CKPG-TV and CFTK-TV Terrace (Terrace, British Columbia), which allowed the two CBC affiliates to use the Corporation's microwave equipment to transfer syndicated programming, when it wasn't being used for CBC programming. In 2000, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved the sale of Monarch's radio and television holdings (including CHAT-TV) to the Jim Pattison Broadcast Group, a division of the Jim Pattison Group. History Toronto-based company Lively Arts Market Builders Inc. was one of several companies that received a licence from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to provide a subscription television service for Canadian cable (Cable television) companies. The company's offering, C Channel, would feature artistic content such as theatrical, opera and ballet performances. This format was distinct from the other new pay-movie services, First Choice (now The Movie Network) and Superchannel (now Movie Central). In April 1994, the company which held CKLM's licence (CKLM Radio Laval-Montréal Inc., controlled by Gérard Brunet), went bankrupt and all assets were transferred to a guaranteed creditor (2754363 Canada Inc.). That company rented the station to Réseau RadioCom Inc., a company operated by René Bourdelais which was already operating the station since January 1, 1994. All of this posed a problem as such changes legally have to be approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), and no approval was sought by any of these companies. On July 15, 1994, the CRTC determined that there were too many irregularities going on, and it ordered CKLM to go off the air by July 17. CKLM initially ignored that order, but early on July 20, 1994, the station's transmitter was apparently hit by lightning and CKLM went off the air. Daniel Lemay. "CKLM 1570 a quitté les ondes", ''La Presse'', July 22, 1994. "En bref... CKLM n'est plus", ''Le Devoir'', July 23, 1994. The CRTC was willing to authorize CKLM to go back on the air if a proper application would have been made; there is however no record of any such application ever being made, and in any case the station never returned to the air. CJAV, an affiliate of CBC Radio (CBC Radio One) since sign-on in 1946, was authorized by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Decision CRTC 84-466 on June 5, 1984 to disaffiliate from the network after CBC established Port Alberni repeater station '''CBTQ-FM''', originally a rebroadcaster of Vancouver station CBU (CBU (AM)) (now rebroadcasting CBCV-FM in Victoria), in December 1983. On December 13, 1984, CJAV increased its transmission power to 1000 watts day and night, and in early 1987, the station began broadcasting 24 hours a day, with overnight programming coming from the Toronto-based Satellite Radio Network. On June 25, 2004, CJAV was purchased by Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (now Island Radio). On April 18, 2005, Island Radio received approval from the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2005-160 to switch CJAV over to the FM band at 93.3 MHz with operating power of 6000 watts; the switch took place on September 2 (with simulcasting on its old 1240 AM frequency continuing until early December) and the station adopted its current mixed format of adult contemporary music and active rock. On June 22, original CJAV owner Harold Warren died at age 90. On June 21, 1978, CFOS opened a semi-satellite station CFPS-AM (CFPS-FM) at Port Elgin (Port Elgin, Ontario) and CFPS was given approval by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) in 2005 to convert to the FM band at 97.9 MHz. History In 1987, Bayshore Broadcasting Corp., owner of 560 CFOS, filed an application with the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) for a new FM station to serve Owen Sound. The application was approved by the CRTC on October 26 the same year. Decision CRTC 87-859 Transmitter testing at 106.5 MHz began in late 1988 and was launched on January 3, 1989 as '''K106.5'''. In 1986, Nanaimo Broadcasting sold CHUB and CHPQ to Benchmark Ventures Inc. (headed by Gene Daniels, who became general manager of both stations); by 1992, CHPQ was producing 43 hours of local programming each week, with the rest of its schedule originating at CHUB. In 1994, Benchmark Ventures merged with Central Island Broadcasting Ltd. (later Island Radio), and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) granted CHUB permission to move to 102.3 FM (as CKWV) and to place a rebroadcaster in Parksville (CKWV-FM-1) at 99.9 FM. The switch took effect in early-1995, at which point two other switches took place; Nanaimo station CKEG (CHWF-FM) moved to the old CHUB frequency of 1570, and CHPQ took over CKEG's former spot on the dial at 1350 AM and became CKCI on July 31, increasing its transmission power from 1000 watts to 10,000. In 1999, CKCI began simulcasting CKEG's oldies format as the two stations took the on-air name '''Good Time Oldies'''. On January 14, 2002, CKCI moved to 88.5 FM and became CIBH, adopting its current adult contemporary (Adult contemporary music) format. Decision CRTC 2001-577 In 2006, CJKX was approved by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission to add a rebroadcaster (CJKX-FM-2) in downtown Toronto, to operate on 95.9 FM, the same frequency as the main station. CRTC Decision 2006-107 Live broadcasting began in December 2000. In 2002, the Greater Toronto Airports Authority was given approval by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to increase power. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2002-394 On May 31, 2005 the radio service reverted from live broadcasting to recorded airport information. On April 9, 2007, the station adopted the business format, but continued to broadcast airport traffic reports and advisories along with the business programming Greater Toronto Airports Authority - Travel Updates Among programming heard on CFBN beginning April 2007 was syndicated American programming such as Dennis Miller and the Glenn Beck Program, which had never before been heard in Canada. Broadcasting Decision CRTC 2006-202 On June 25, 1997, the station was licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) to move to the FM band. Decision CRTC 97-271 It completed the move on May 25, 1998, launching on 92.9 FM with the new call sign '''CIZN-FM''' and a hot adult contemporary format branded as "The Zone". Licensed by the CRTC (Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) in 2001 CRTC Decision 2001-353 , the station airs a community radio format for the area's First Nations community. * Pierre Marc Johnson, FRSC, former Premier of the Province of Quebec * André Bureau, O.C., former Chair of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and current Chair of Astral Media * The Honourable Michel Bastarache, C.C., former Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada History On December 3, 1986, Mervyn Russell, representing a company to be incorporated received approval from the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to operate a new FM radio station at Saint John. Decision CRTC 86-1174 The station began broadcasting in 1987 with Gary Crowell as the GM, and Jim Goldrich returned to K100 from working at CJYQ in Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador). K100's original studios and offices were on 400 Main Street in Place 400. In the mid-1990's, K100 moved their studios and offices to Union Street, where they are still located as of August 2011. In 1997, the station was purchased by Newcap Broadcasting and was re-purchased by MBS Radio (Maritime Broadcasting System) in 2005. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission) (CRTC) announced that it is setting August 31, 2011 as the deadline for over-the-air (w:over-the-air) (OTA) television transmissions to go digital. In Broadcasting Public Notice CRTC 2007-53, the commission outlines that OTA broadcasts should be digital in all markets, with possible exceptions in northern and remote communities where analog transmissions will not cause interference. CAVCO is the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office, part of the Department of Canadian Heritage. The CRTC is the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (w:Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission), a communications authority like the Federal Communications Commission (w:Federal Communications Commission) (FCC) in the United States, Independent Television Commission (w:Independent Television Commission) (ITC) in the UK (excluding Wales), and the Australian Communications and Media Authority (w:Australian Communications and Media Authority).


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