Places Known For

made large


Ivanovo

government, contribute to the development of youth initiatives, arrange socially topical activities, like the charity marathon “Ty nam nuzhen” (“We need you”) aimed at supporting children with disabilities. There are several opportunities for the talented youth as well, e.g. awards and grants from the Head of the city. In 2012 schoolchildren of Ivanovo supported the city’s bid to the contest “The European Youth Capital 2015” and organized a flash mob and made large patchwork cloth. As a candidate


Norilsk

in 1920, and in the Merensky Reef, South Africa in 1924 made large-scale production of nickel possible. ** Komatiite hosted Ni-Cu-PGE deposits (Kambalda type komatiitic nickel ore deposits) ** Subvolcanic (Subvolcanic rock) feeder subtype, typified by Noril'sk-Talnakh (Norilsk) and the Thompson Belt, Canada ** Intrusive-related Ni-Cu-PGE, typified by Voisey's Bay (Voisey's Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador), Canada and Jinchuan, China Ore


Yinchuan

of the industry, universities and colleges, is huddled around the main train station while the old city, the more livable of the two, lies 8 km to the east. Rapid growth over recent years has been quickly drawing these two distinct centers together as foreign investment grows. Yinchuan historically served as a trade route town made large for its convenient location between Western Chinese cities such as Urumqi and the Eastern ones such as Beijing and Shenyang. Get in By plane


Kerman

Aḥmad founded the Būyid confederation (Buyid dynasty). Originally a soldier in the service of the Ziyārīds (Ziyarids) of Ṭabaristān (Tabaristan), ‘Alī was able to recruit an army to defeat a Turkish general from Baghdad named Yāqūt (Yaqut) in 934. Over the next nine years the three brothers gained control of the remainder of the caliphate, while accepting the titular authority of the caliph in Baghdad. The Būyids made large territorial gains. Fars (Fars Province) and Jibal were


Hungarian Soviet Republic

a revolutionary wave of socialist and communist uprisings across Europe, most notably the German Revolution, the Hungarian Revolution (Hungarian Soviet Republic), Biennio Rosso and the revolutionary war in Finland (Finnish Civil War) with the short lived Finnish Socialist Workers' Republic, which made large gains and met with considerable success in the early stages; see also Revolutions of 1917-23. thumb 200px left Carantania Kingdom of Carantania (File:Regnum Carantanum.PNG) The region has had a turbulent history: it has been inhabited since the Stone Age, it was later included into the Roman Empire and subsequently into the Odoacer's Kingdom of Italy, the Kingdom of the Ostrogoths, the Kingdom of the Lombards, the Kingdom of the Avars (Eurasian Avars), the Slavic state of Samo, the Frankish Empire, the Principality of Lower Pannonia (9th century), and Arnulf (Arnulf of Carinthia)'s Kingdom of Carantania (Carantania) (9th-10th century). In the late 10th century it was invaded by the Hungarians and was under administration of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary (Kingdom of Hungary (medieval)) until the 16th century, when former territories of this kingdom were divided between the Habsburg Monarchy and the Ottoman Empire. Since then, Prekmurje was mostly under administration of the Habsburg Monarchy, with brief periods of Ottoman administration. Following the dissolution of the Habsburg Monarchy in 1918, the region was firstly included into the Hungarian Democratic Republic and subsequently into the Hungarian Soviet Republic. In 1919, it proclaimed independence as the short-lived Republic of Prekmurje and was subsequently included into the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes (later known as Yugoslavia). From 1941 to 1945, Prekmurje was temporarily occupied by the Axis Powers and in 1945 it was included into the new socialist Yugoslavia (SFRY). Since 1991, it is part of an independent Slovenia. After break-up of Austria-Hungary, the town was occupied by the Czechoslovak Legions in January 1919. However, the army of the Hungarian Soviet Republic came to the town in May 1919, but control reverted to Czechoslovakia in July 1919. After the First Vienna Award in 1938, the town belonged to Hungary to the end of 1944. During the Socialist Czechoslovakia, food industry developed here, for example sugar factory was established in 1966 and meat processing plant in 1977. After Eisner's USPD had lost the elections, he decided to resign from his office. On 21 February 1919, as he was on his way to parliament to announce his resignation, he was shot by the right-wing (Right-wing politics) nationalist (Nationalism) Anton Graf von Arco auf Valley, who was rejected from membership in the Thule Society because of Jewish (Judaism) ancestry on his mother's side. This assassination caused unrest and lawlessness in Bavaria, and the news of a soviet revolution (Hungarian Soviet Republic) in Hungary encouraged communists (communism) and anarchists (anarchism) to seize power . The Romanian control of Transylvania, which had also a Hungarian-speaking population of 1,662,000 (31,6%, according to the census data (Treaty of Trianon#Demographic consequences) of 1910), was widely resented in the new nation state of Hungary. A war (Hungarian-Romanian War of 1919) between the Kingdom of Romania and the Hungarian Soviet Republic, who also had parallel conflicts (Revolutions_and_interventions_in_Hungary_(1918–1920)) with Czechoslovakia and the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, was fought mainly in 1919 and ended with a partial Romanian occupation of Hungary. The Romanian army provided weapons C. Kiriţescu: Istoria războiului pentru întregirea României, Vol. II, ed. Romania Noua, 1923, pp. 612 to support the army of Admiral Horthy, who became the regent of Hungary after the Romanian troops left Hungary in early 1920.


Sausalito, California

Operational history SS ''Mission Buenaventura'' was laid down 29 March 1944 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marinship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 28 May 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Fred W. Boole; and delivered 28 June 1944. Chartered to Deconhill Shipping Company, for operations, she spent the remainder of the War supporting the victorious Allied forces in the Pacific. She was returned to the Maritime Commission in March 1946 and on 30 March was laid up in the Maritime Commission Reserve Fleet at Mobile, Alabama. Halpin became composer in residence at the Headlands Center for the Arts, in Sausalito, California, and played with a number of bands over the years, including: The Sponges, Funhouse, Folklore, SnakeDoctor and Plank Road. While on the West Coast, Halpin and his wife managed a New Wave (New Wave music) punk rock night club, The Roosevelt, before moving to Indiana in 1995 to pursue opportunities in the visual arts. Career ''Mission San Francisco'' was laid down on 5 May 1945 as ''Contocook'' under a Maritime Commission contract by Marinship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched on 18 September 1945, sponsored by Mrs. John J. Manning; and delivered on 11 October 1945. Chartered to Deconhill Shipping Company, upon her delivery, for operations, she served until 14 April 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Mobile, Alabama. Career ''Mission Santa Ynez'' was laid down 9 September 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marinship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 19 December 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Ralph K. Davies; and delivered 13 March 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers, Inc., for operations, she spent the remainder of the War carrying fuel to our forces overseas. She remained in this capacity until 28 March 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime reserve Fleet at James River, Virginia. Service history ''Mission Purisma'' was laid down on 10 June 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marinship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 25 August 1943, sponsored by Mrs. John Collins; and delivered 23 November 1943. Chartered to Deconhill Shipping Company for operations, she carried fuel to allied forces in the Pacific (Pacific Ocean) and the Atlantic (Atlantic Ocean) theaters until 27 April 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Suisun Bay, California. Career ''Mission Loreto'' was laid down on 27 April 1944 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito (Sausalito, California), California; launched 28 June 1944; sponsored by Mrs. S. D. Bechtel; and delivered 22 July 1944. Operated, under charter, by Los Angeles Tanker Operators Inc., she spent the remainder of the War transporting fuel to Allied forces in the western Pacific (Pacific Ocean), during which time she was awarded the National Defense Service Medal. She continued in these duties until 26 April 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Mobile (Mobile, Alabama), Alabama. Career ''Mission San Antonio'' was laid down on 15 January 1944 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marinship Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 8 April 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Marian McClure; and delivered 24 May 1944. Chartered to Los Angeles Tanker Operators Inc., on her delivery date for operations, she spent the remainder of the War carrying vital fuel products to Allied forces in the western Pacific (during which time she was awarded the National Defense Service Medal). She was returned to the Maritime Commission on 30 April 1946 and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Mobile, Alabama. As oiler, 1943–1957 ''Mission San Fernando'' was laid down on 26 August 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched on 25 November 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Ruth B. Krohn; and delivered on 29 February 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers Inc., for operations, she served the remainder of the War carrying fuel to Allied forces in the western Pacific (Pacific Ocean) (during which time she was twice awarded the Battle Efficiency Award as well as the National Defense Service Medal). She remained in service until 10 May 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Reserve Fleet at Olympia, Washington. Career ''Mission San Jose'' was laid down 17 July 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 7 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Robert L. Bridges and delivered 29 January 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers, Inc. for operations, she spent the remainder of the war carrying fuel to Allied forces overseas. She served in this capacity until 3 May 1946, when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Mobile, Alabama. Career ''Mission San Luis Obispo'' was laid down on 18 April 1944 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched on 18 June 1944, sponsored by Mrs. George A. Patterson; and delivered on 15 July 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers, Inc. for operations, she spent the remainder of the War carrying fuel to our forces in the Pacific (Pacific Ocean) (during which time she was awarded the National Defense Service Medal). She remained in this capacity until 27 March 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at James River, Virginia. Career ''Mission San Luis Rey'' was laid down 15 October 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 29 January 1944; sponsored by Mrs. T. L. Phillips; and delivered 31 March 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers, Inc. for operations, she spent the remainder of the War carrying fuel to Allied bases overseas (during which time she was awarded the National Defense Service Medal). She served in this capacity until 29 March 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at James River, Virginia. Career ''Mission San Miguel'' was laid down 11 August 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 31 October 1943; sponsored by Mrs. John W. Hardie; and delivered 19 February 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers, Inc. for operations, she spent the remainder of the War carrying fuel to Allied forces overseas. She remained in this capacity until 20 May 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Mobile, Alabama. Career ''Mission Santa Barbara'' was laid down 8 April 1944 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 8 June 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Carl H. Nilson; and delivered 8 July 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers, Inc. for operations, she spent the remainder of the War carrying fuel to Allied bases in the Pacific (Pacific Ocean). She remained in this capacity until 8 May 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Olympia, Washington. Career ''Mission Santa Clara'' was laid down 15 March 1944 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 18 May 1944; sponsored by Mrs. Donald E. Reed; and delivered 21 June 1944. Chartered to Los Angeles Tanker Operators, Inc. for operations, she spent the remainder of the War carrying fuel to Allied forces in the western Pacific (Pacific Ocean). She remained in this capacity until 8 April 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Mobile, Alabama. Career ''Mission Santa Cruz'' was laid down 26 June 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 8 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Frank C. Sewell; and delivered 31 December 1943. Chartered to Deconhill Shipping Corporation for operations, she spent the remainder of the War carrying fuel to our forces fighting in the Pacific (Pacific Ocean) (during which time she was awarded the National Defense Service Medal). She remained in this capacity until 3 June 1946 when she was returned to the Maritime Commission and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Mobile, Alabama. Career ''Mission Soledad'' was laid down 12 July 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marine Ship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched 28 September 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Atholl McBean; delivered 16 January 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers, Inc. for operations, she spent the remainder of the War carrying fuel to Allied forces in the western Pacific (Pacific Ocean). She remained in this capacity until mid-February 1946, when she returned to her building yard and was laid up in reserve. Service history ''Mission Carmel'' was laid down on 1 January 1944 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marinship Corporation, Sausalito, California; launched on 28 March 1944, sponsored by Mrs. W. B. Lardner; and delivered on 17 May 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers, Inc. for operations, she spent the remainder of the war providing fuel to allied forces overseas (during which time she was awarded the National Defense Service Medal). Returned to the Maritime Commission on 11 April 1946 she was laid up in the Reserve Fleet at Portland, Oregon. Career ''Mission San Carlos'' was laid down on 1 November 1943 under a Maritime Commission contract by Marinship Corporation, Sausalito, California: launched 12 February 1944; sponsored by Mrs. J. H. Pomeroy; and delivered 15 April 1944. Chartered to Pacific Tankers, Inc. for operations on 15 April, she spent the remainder of the War providing allied forces overseas with the vital fuel needed to keep America's armies on the move (during which time she was awarded the National Defense Service Medal). She was returned to the Maritime Commission on 20 April 1946 and laid up in the Maritime Reserve Fleet at Mobile, Alabama.


Concord, New Hampshire

; In 2004, Democrats made large gains in Concord (Concord, New Hampshire), winning the governorship, adding 30 seats in the House, 1 seat in the Senate, winning an Executive Council (New Hampshire Executive Council) seat in District 5 for the first time since the 1960s, one of many races won by Democrats for the first time in decades. The speed limit on Interstate 93 through Franconia Notch State Park falls to 45 mph where the highway narrows to one lane in each


Works Progress Administration

building in San Francisco. In 1925, he designed the commemorative half dollar for the California Diamond Jubilee. During this period he also illustrated a number of books, made large murals, and published charts, maps (cartes) and diagrams of the West and Western themes. Beginning in 1937, Mora wrote and illustrated children's books about the West. In 1939, a Works Progress Administration project was completed, with Mora bas-relief sculpture adorning the King City High School theater building. Mora died October 10, 1947 in Monterey, California. thumb alt Poppy Girl, 1915 (File:J Mora - Poppy Girl.jpg) thumb The facade of the Robert Stanton Theater at King City High School (File:KingCityHS-RobertStantonTheater.jpg) in King City, California. Completed in 1939, this Works Progress Administration project featured bas-relief sculpture by Jo Mora Construction and history The building was opened in 1937 to replace the original library building (the "Old Libe," Fenton Hall, completed in 1907), which the University's collections had outgrown. Construction of the library was financed as a Depression-era (Great Depression) Works Progress Administration (WPA) project, spearheaded by Oregon senator (United States Senate) Frederick Steiwer and took more than two years to complete. "The New Libe" as the ''Oregon Daily Emerald'' student newspaper had christened the building, was designed by Ellis F. Lawrence of the Oregon-based architectural firm Lawrence, Holford, and Allyn. Lawrence was also a driving force in much of the core architecture of the UO campus and was the first Dean of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts (University of Oregon School of Architecture and Allied Arts). The rich architecture of the building reflects an Art Deco aesthetic with "modernized Lombardy and Greco-Roman" elements as well as many integrated artistic embellishments including "the fifteen stone heads by Edna Dunberg and Louise Utter Pritchard, ornamental memorial gates by O. B. Dawson, carved wooden panels by Arthur Clough, and two large murals painted by Albert and Arthur Runquist." http: libweb.uoregon.edu knight history.html ...that the '''Nivelle Offensive''' during World War I involved around 1.2 million French (France) troops and over 7,000 guns? ...that American (United States) comics writer and artist '''Don Rico''' started his creative career in the Works Progress Administration Federal Art Project during the Great Depression? History The first building to house Lake Orion students was built in 1893 and served grades K-12. It was demolished in the 1930s by a Works Progress Administration project as part of the program designed by the Franklin Roosevelt administration as a way to provide jobs. In 1927 a new building was constructed that would house students for the next 30 years. Located within the Village of Lake Orion (Lake Orion), that building is still in use today as the Ehman Center, and is used by various businesses. In 1938, the WPA (Works Progress Administration) photographer Marion Post Wolcott took a photo of Geneva Varner Clark of Varnertown, the only area resident who at the time identified as Native American, and her three children. Theirs is the only photo of Lowcountry Indians in the Library of Congress. Its caption is "Indian (mixed breed -- 'brass ankles (Brass Ankles)') family near Summerville, South Carolina." She stands, her arms wrapped around her in the cold, with three children and a dog in the dirt and rocks in front of a pine-board house with a roof of tattered wooden shingles and thin stick porch columns that lean in on each other holding it up. Marion Post Wolcott, "Indian (mixed breed - brass ankle) family near Summerville, South Carolina", Library of Congress History Initially built in 1936 by the Works Progress Administration, over old tennis courts. It has undergone many renovations. In 1951 a lunchroom and 2 classrooms were added. In 2001 a renovation of Clairemont was completed. Improvements included new heating and air conditioning, a new media center, new classrooms and paving over most of the athletic field to expand the parking lot. In 2005, four new classrooms were added. Currently the school enrolls students in kindergarten through the third grade. History The area around Roxana began offering education in 1802 with the construction of '''Gilham's Pasture School''' on the northeast corner of what is now 13th Street and Edwardsville Road in Wood River, the current site of a Dairy Queen. Other general schools opened and closed throughout the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century; these include '''Brushy Grove School''' (not to be confused with its later incarnation, '''Brushey Grove School''') from 1858 to 1969, '''Roxana School''' from 1918 to 1926, '''Edison School''' from 1926 to 1936, and '''Burbank School''' starting in 1936. Burbank was built as a WPA (Works Progress Administration) project, and was named after botanist Luther Burbank. thumb 250px right Saint Paul Central High School, Marshall Ave and Lexington Parkway, 1912–1980 (Image:CHS-Marshall-Lexington-1912-1980-2-Approx-1912-opt10.jpg) A new school, designed by Clarence H. Johnston, Sr., was built in 1912 on the corner of Marshall Avenue and Lexington Parkway, and was attempted to be renamed Lexington High School; alumni, however, wanted to keep the moniker '''Central High School'''. A compromise was reached when the Minuteman (Minutemen) was adopted as a logo and mascot. In other words, the name of the school was retained, but for those who wanted the school to be named "Lexington," its logo and mascot were named after the colonial militia men of 1775 at Lexington, Massachusetts, who fought against the British in the first skirmishes of the War of Independence, and were required to be ready at a minute's notice. The adjacent stadium was built in the early 1940s by the WPA (Works Progress Administration), as denoted by a plaque on the brick facade of the stands. It was renamed James Griffin Stadium in 1998. Relief While local relief before 1932 focused on providing small sums of cash or baskets of food and coal for the neediest, the federal programs launched by Hoover and greatly expanded by the New Deal tried to use massive construction projects with prevailing wages to jumpstart the economy and solve the unemployment crisis. ERA, FERA (Federal Emergency Relief Administration), WPA (Works Progress Administration) and PWA (Public Works Administration) built and repaired the public infrastructure in dramatic fashion but did little to foster the recovery of the private sector. In sharp contrast to Britain, where private housing construction pulled the country out of depression, American cities saw little private construction or investment, and so they languished in the economic doldrums even as their parks, sewers, airports and municipal buildings were enhanced. The problem in retrospect was that the New Deal's investment in the public infrastructure had only a small "multiplier" effect, in contrast to the high multiplier for jobs that private investment might have created. Richard J. Jensen, "The Causes and Cures of Unemployment in the Great Depression." There were also small camps called hoovervilles that had very poor people living in them. , ''Journal of Interdisciplinary History'' (1989) 19:553-83. *1928: A home economics building is added to the campus. *1934: Depression-era WPA (Works Progress Administration) funding allows Chamblee High School to add eight new classrooms, a new gymnasium, a canning plant and a machine shop. The school becomes the first in DeKalb County to be accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. *December 8, 1941: the entire campus burns to the ground after fire breaks out. Classes are relocated to the area hospitals and Baptist and Methodist churches. In January 1937, Voorhis's first legislative initiative was to propose a dramatic increase in spending for the Works Progress Administration in order to increase employment. plot on which the school is situated cost $35,000. The school opened in the fall of 1939 with fifty faculty members and 1,250 pupils. In 1959, Kenmore East High School was opened as the district continued to grow. At that time, the Highland Parkway school officially became Kenmore West High School. Raymond S. Frazier was appointed to the position of principal of Kenmore West in 1952. ''A Brief History of Kenmore West High School''. Accessed July 16, 2006. * Nikolai Trubetzkoi Trubetskoy, Nikolai S. .''Grundzüge der Phonologie''. ''Principles of Phonology'' . ''Travaux du Cercle Linguistique de Prague'', 7. Prague, 1939. *WPA (Works Progress Administration) Federal Writers' Project, ''Life History Manuscripts from the Folklore Project'', 1936-1940. Online version: Library of Congress ''American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936 - 1940'', Item 27 of 312 (Nebraska), "Charles Blooah" '''Sheboygan Municipal Auditorium and Armory''' (commonly known as '''The Armory''') is an indoor arena in Sheboygan (Sheboygan, Wisconsin), Wisconsin built in 1942 on the city's lakefront as a WPA (Works Progress Administration) project. Mead Public Library timeline ''The Sheboygan Press'' "City may shut down Armory", Sept. 20, 2006, pages A1–A2 '''Harry Lloyd Hopkins (w:Harry Hopkins)''' (August 17, 1890 – January 29, 1946) was one of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's closest advisers. He was one of the architects of the New Deal, especially the relief programs of the Works Progress Administration (w:Works Progress Administration) (WPA), which he directed and built into the largest employer in the country. In World War II he was Roosevelt's chief diplomatic advisor and troubleshooter and was a key policy maker in the $50 billion Lend-Lease (w:Lend-Lease) program that sent aid to the allies.


Oman

Aḥmad founded the Būyid confederation (Buyid dynasty). Originally a soldier in the service of the Ziyārīds (Ziyarids) of Ṭabaristān (Tabaristan), ‘Alī was able to recruit an army to defeat a Turkish general from Baghdad named Yāqūt (Yaqut) in 934. Over the next nine years the three brothers gained control of the remainder of the caliphate, while accepting the titular authority of the caliph in Baghdad. The Būyids made large territorial gains. Fars (Fars Province) and Jibal were


Mauritius

in that it is generally thinner and larger. In Trinidad and Tobago there are two ways of having paratha the first is made large and can be eaten hot of the tawa, this is the common home version. The most popular is commonly called "buss up shot", an onomatopoeia referring to the method of making it; generally this involves the finished, hot roti being struck to break it up into smaller strip-like pieces. "Burst-up shirt" is a misnomer used by people unfamiliar with the local Trinidadian


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017