Places Known For

made excellent


Antigua and Barbuda

comosus ''), corn (maize), sweet potatoes (white with firmer flesh than the bright orange "sweet potato" used in the United States), chiles (chili pepper), guava, tobacco, and cotton. The indigenous West Indians made excellent seagoing vessels which they used to sail the Atlantic and the Caribbean. As a result, Caribs and Arawaks were able to colonize much of South America and the Caribbean Islands. Their descendants still live there, notably in Brazil, Venezuela


Greater Sudbury

and smokestacks. Wharton renamed the Camden plant the American Nickel Works, and his office there became his center of operations. However, the use of nickel in coinage was temporarily halted, and soon the Camden plant burned. Wharton rebuilt it in 1868 and made excellent profits from producing nickel because it became favored for coinage. Wharton won wide acclaim for his malleable nickel, the first in the world, and also for nickel magnets, and received the Gold Medal at the Exposition Universelle


Samarkand

; ref The Karotegin consisted of a highland district bounded on the north by Samarkand and Kokand, on the east by Ferghana, on the south by Darvaz and on the west by Hissar (Hisor) and other Bokharian provinces. Traditionally rough woolen cloth and mohair were woven by the natives, who also made excellent firearms and other weapons. Gold was mined in various places and there were salt-pits in the mountains. The chief town, Garm (Garm, Tajikistan), situated on a hill on the right bank of the Vakhsh River, was a place of some 2,000 inhabitants, Commons:Category:Samarkand Wikipedia:Samarkand


Hamburg

route homeward to Hamburg. She made excellent time with her combination of two masts and engines, and by 7 May was nearing her first port of call at Plymouth on the Devon coast. '''Rolf Danneberg''' (born March 1, 1953 in Hamburg) is a former Germa (Germany)n athlete who, representing West Germany, won the gold medal in discus throw at the 1984 Summer Olympics (Athletics at the 1984 Summer Olympics) with 66.60 metres. He won the Olympic bronze medal in 1988 (Athletics at the 1988 Summer Olympics) in Seoul. **Munich - Franz Josef Strauss Airport **Hamburg - Fuhlsbüttel Airport * '''Greece In 1930, following the Prussian Concordat, the Prefecture of Schleswig-Holstein and the Northern Missions of Germany, comprising several Protestant areas of Northern Germany, were added to the diocese: Hamburg, Bremen, Schleswig-Holstein, Mecklenburg-Schwerin (Free State of Mecklenburg-Schwerin), Mecklenburg-Strelitz and Schaumburg-Lippe (the latter ceded to Hildesheim diocese in 1965). On the same occasion Osnabrück became again a suffragan of Cologne (Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Cologne). - align "center" 2004 Commissionong of the upgrades to the Hamburg–Berlin rail line (LZB with CE2 system software) 5 controllers - In protest at the Peace of Prague (Peace of Prague (1635)), Arnim left the Saxon forces in 1635. He was kidnapped by Axel Oxenstierna, for alleged intrigues with Wallenstein against Sweden, and was taken to Stockholm in 1637, but escaped to Hamburg in November 1638 and thereafter devoted himself to freeing Germany from foreign domination. He was carrying on a campaign, as lieutenant general of the imperial and Saxon forces against the French and Swedes, when he died in Dresden. The ''Dana Regina'' was ordered in 1969 by DFDS, the oldest operational Danish shipping company. The ship was completed in 1974 and christened MS ''Dana Regina''. After a promotional cruise from Copenhagen to Esbjerg via Harwich and London she started scheduled service on the Harwich–Esbjerg route on 8 July 1974. In January 1977 the ship was rebuilt at Hamburg, Germany with an enlarged car capacity. In October 1983 the ''Dana Regina'' was transferred to Copenhagen–Oslo route. '''''Rickmer Rickmers''''' is a sailing ship (three masted bark) permanently moored as a museum ship in Hamburg, near the ''Cap San Diego''. The ''Rickmer Rickmers'' was built in 1896 by the Rickmers shipyard (Rickmers Reederei) in Bremerhaven, and was first used on the Hong Kong route carrying rice and bamboo. In 1912 she was bought by Carl Christian Krabbenhöft, renamed '''''Max''''', and transferred to the Hamburg - Chile route. After rebuilding at Blohm & Voss, Hamburg where a second storey was added to her nightclub, ''Viking Song'' emerged as Fred. Olsen's new MS ''Braemar''. She was initially set on a route connecting Oslo, Norway with Harwich, UK, although her route varied a lot during the next five years, with Hirtshals, Denmark replacing or appearing alongside Harwich as the main destination. In December 1990 Fred. Olsen sold their ferry operations to the new Color Line (Color Line (ferry operator)), however ''Braemar'' was not included in the sale and she was laid up. '''Anastasia "Tasoula" Kelesidou''' ( Commons:Category:Hamburg Wikipedia:Hamburg Dmoz:Regional Europe Germany States Hamburg


France

of the picaresque technique in Central Europe. J.B. Priestley made excellent ''The Good Companions'' (1929) and won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction. Many other novels of vagabond life were consciously written as picaresque novels, such as Henry Miller's ''Tropic of Cancer (Tropic of Cancer (novel))'' (1934).

studied the effects of the institutions and system of life which prevailed in each region, on the material and moral condition of its inhabitants. In this way he gained an extensive and accurate acquaintance with continental rural economy, of which he made excellent use in studying parallel phenomena at home. The accounts he gave of the results of his observations were among his happiest efforts; no one, said Mill, was able to write narratives of foreign visits at once so instructive and so interesting. In these excursions he made the acquaintance of several distinguished persons, amongst others of M. Lonce de Lavergne and M. Émile de Laveleye (Émile Louis Victor de Laveleye). To the memory of the former of these he afterwards paid a graceful tribute in a biographical sketch (''Fortnightly Review'', February 1881); and to the close of his life there existed between him and M. de Laveleye relations of mutual esteem and cordial intimacy. Commons:Category:France WikiPedia:France Dmoz:Regional Europe France


Canada

the Camden plant the American Nickel Works, and his office there became his center of operations. However, the use of nickel in coinage was temporarily halted, and soon the Camden plant burned. Wharton rebuilt it in 1868 and made excellent profits from producing nickel because it became favored for coinage. Wharton won wide acclaim for his malleable nickel, the first in the world, and also for nickel magnets, and received the Gold Medal at the Exposition Universelle (1878) Paris Exposition


Germany

. He studied the effects of the institutions and system of life which prevailed in each region, on the material and moral condition of its inhabitants. In this way he gained an extensive and accurate acquaintance with continental rural economy, of which he made excellent use in studying parallel phenomena at home. The accounts he gave of the results of his observations were among his happiest efforts; no one, said Mill, was able to write narratives of foreign visits at once so instructive and so interesting. In these excursions he made the acquaintance of several distinguished persons, amongst others of M. Lonce de Lavergne and M. Émile de Laveleye (Émile Louis Victor de Laveleye). To the memory of the former of these he afterwards paid a graceful tribute in a biographical sketch (''Fortnightly Review'', February 1881); and to the close of his life there existed between him and M. de Laveleye relations of mutual esteem and cordial intimacy. '''Wilhelm Georg Friedrich Roscher''' (October 21, 1817 – June 4, 1894) was a German (Germany) economist from Hanover. '''Johannes Peter Müller''' (14 July 1801 – 28 April 1858), was a German (Germany) physiologist, comparative anatomist (comparative anatomy), ichthyologist (ichthyology), and herpetologist (herpetology), known not only for his discoveries but also for his ability to synthesize knowledge. right thumb Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle. (Image:Jakob henle.jpg) '''Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle''' (9 July 1809 - 13 May 1885) was a German (Germany) physician, pathologist and anatomist. He is credited with the discovery of the loop of Henle in the kidney. His essay "On Miasma and Contagia" was an early argument for the germ theory of disease. He was an important figure in the development of modern medicine. Commons:Category:Germany Wikipedia:Germany Dmoz:Regional Europe Germany


United States

the American Nickel Works, and his office there became his center of operations. However, the use of nickel in coinage was temporarily halted, and soon the Camden plant burned. Wharton rebuilt it in 1868 and made excellent profits from producing nickel because it became favored for coinage. Wharton won wide acclaim for his malleable nickel, the first in the world, and also for nickel magnets, and received the Gold Medal at the Paris Exposition of 1878 (Exposition Universelle (1878)). His


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