Places Known For

long study


Middlesbrough

) Brian Davies , Terry Eagleton, Alasdair MacIntyre, Anthony Kenny and Seamus Heaney '''Herbert McCabe''' (1926–2001) was an English Dominican (Dominican Order) priest, theologian (Roman Catholic theology) and philosopher, who was born in Middlesbrough in the North Riding of Yorkshire. After studying chemistry and philosophy at Manchester University, he joined the Dominicans in 1949, where under Victor White he began his life-long study of the works of Thomas Aquinas. He was also a student of Columba Ryan. Horace King was born in Grangetown (Grangetown, North Yorkshire) near Middlesbrough. His father John William King was an insurance salesman and Methodist local preacher. He was educated at Stockton Secondary School (Stockton-on-Tees) from 1912 to 1917 and never lost touch with these local roots. Horace attended King's College London and graduated with a first-class Bachelor's degree in English. Upon graduating in 1922 Mr King worked as a teacher in Taunton's school in Southampton. He became head of the English department in 1927. He left in 1947 to become headteacher of Regent's Park Grammar in 1947. Whilst working as a teacher, King studied part-time for his Ph.D. His thesis was on the Folios of Shakespeare. He received his doctorate from King's College London in 1940. He had been excused from military service during World War II due to a duodenal ulcer. He and his family - first wife Victoria Florence (née Harris); daughter Margaret - and Taunton's school were evacuated to Bournemouth from Southampton in 1940. Among the many pupils was 15 year old Benny Hill. Dr King "''Doc''" was always a keen musician - piano;piano-accordion and organ - and during the 2nd World War he formed various concert parties - "The V Concert Party" was one - which toured the smaller outlying military bases and entertained troops not often reached by ENSA. He also raised funds by organising concerts to "buy" Spitfires and send aid to Russia. He is believed to have instigated fund raising in Hampshire by letters he wrote to the ''Hampshire Chronicle'' in July and August 1940. His "Spitfire Song" was recorded by Joe Loss and his orchestra. This is still available on HMV ''Songs of the 2nd World War'' (Track 18). He and a teacher colleague also were the first to translate "Lili Marlene" but were too slow to get their version to the song-publishing market. '''Christopher Quinten''' (born '''Christopher Bell''' on 12 July 1957, Middlesbrough, is a British actor, best known for his role as Brian Tilsley on ''Coronation Street'', which he played from 1978 to 1989. DATE OF BIRTH 12 July 1957 PLACE OF BIRTH Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire, England DATE OF DEATH Between 1879 and 1882, as Art Superintendent at the Linthorpe Art Pottery in Linthorpe in Middlesbrough he designed over 1,000 pots. If his ceramic work from the 1860s onwards (for firms such as Mintons, Wedgwood, Royal Worcester, Watcombe (Watcombe Pottery), Linthorpe, Old Hall at Hanley (Hanley, Staffordshire) and Ault (William Ault)) is considered, he must be amongst the most influential ceramic designers of any period. Much of his work remains to be identified, although wallpaper designs for American, and textiles for French and German manufacturers have recently been located. background group_or_band origin Middlesbrough Leeds, Yorkshire, England genre Post-punk *Bowes and the rest of Startforth Rural District was transferred from the North Riding to County Durham *Middlesbrough, Redcar and nearby areas were transferred from the North Riding to Cleveland (Cleveland, England). The area was returned to Yorkshire in 1996 as part of the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire. *most of the East Riding was transferred to Humberside. The area became the larger part of the new ceremonial county of the East Riding of Yorkshire in 1996. Early years and formation (1978–1984) Simon Toulson-Clarke formed his first band at age thirteen with school friend Paddy Talbot, playing covers of Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple as well as some self-penned material. Other early influences are cited as being Marc Bolan, David Bowie, Cream (Cream (band)), Pink Floyd, Cat Stevens and particularly Buffy Sainte-Marie. WikiPedia:Middlesbrough Dmoz:Regional Europe United Kingdom England Cleveland Middlesbrough Commons:Category:Middlesbrough


Tangier

Artefact,” ''Portuguese Studies Review'' 15 (1–2) (2007; publ. 2009): 103–192; a long study of the previous Portuguese Breakwater at Tangier, and interesting notes on the English Mole and its contractors are found in Elbl, ''Portuguese Tangier,'' Chapter Eight. An attempt of Sultan Moulay Ismail (Ismail Ibn Sharif) of Morocco to seize the town in 1679 was unsuccessful; but a crippling blockade by his Jaysh al-Rifi ultimately forced the English to withdraw. The English destroyed the town and its port facilities prior to their departure in 1684. Under Moulay Ismail (Ismail Ibn Sharif) the city was reconstructed to some extent, but it gradually declined until, by 1810, the population was no more than 5,000. thumb left The American Legation, Tangier American Legation (File:American-legation-tangier-2.jpg) courtyard 300px thumb left View of the old medina of Tangier (File:Tanger1.JPG) thumb right Cabo Espartel light house (File:Faro de Cabo Espartel.jpg) The United States dedicated its first consulate in Tangier during the George Washington administration (Presidency of George Washington). ''Power, Faith, and Fantasy: In the beginning, for America, was the Middle East'', Matt Buckingham, Wweek, February 14, 2007. In 1821, the Legation Building (Tangier American Legation Museum) in Tangier became the first piece of property acquired abroad by the U.S. government (Federal government of the United States)—a gift to the U.S. from Sultan Moulay Suliman (Slimane of Morocco). In 1828, Great Britain blockaded the port in retaliation for piracy. WikiPedia:Tangier Commons:Category:Tangier Dmoz:Regional Africa Morocco Localities Tanger


Kiev

, and Jonah (Jonah of Kiev) (1472) Shortly after becoming a monk, Justin, along with several other students traveled to Petrograd, Russia for a year-long study in the Orthodox Seminary there. It was here the young monk Justin first dedicated himself more fully to Orthodoxy and the monastic way of life. He learned of the great Russian ascetics: St. Anthony (Anthony of Kiev) and Theodosius (Theodosius of Kiev) of the Caves in Kiev, St. Seraphim of Sarov, St. Sergius of Radonezh, St. John of Kronstadt and others. Liberation In mid-August 1943, the Germans started building the Panther-Wotan (Panther-Wotan line) defence line along the Dnieper from Kiev to Crimea, and retreated back to it in September 1943. The Germans held the city as a bridgehead over the Dnieper, with elements of 40th Panzer and 17th Corps. The Eastern Front, Timeline 1943 The Soviet Southwestern Front (Southwestern Front (Soviet Union)), commanded by Army General (Army General (Soviet Union)) Rodion Malinovsky, attacked the city on 10 October 1943. Whilst the defenders held against the attacks, the Red Army reinforced its troops and launched a surprise night attack at 22:00 on 13 October, ''Moscow-Stalingrad-Berlin-Prague, Memories of Army Commander'' ("Москва-Сталинград-Берлин-Прага". Записки командарма), by Dmitri Danilovich Lelyushenko (Лелюшенко Дмитрий Данилович), pub Nauka, Moscow, 1987, chapter 4. "laying down a barrage of shellfire bigger than anything... seen to date (it was here that entire 'divisions' of artillery appeared for the first time) and throwing in no fewer than ten divisions strongly supported by armour", the Red Army broke into the bridgehead forcing the Germans to abandon it on 14 October. The retreating Germans destroyed the Zaporizhstal steel plant almost completely; they demolished the big railway bridge again, and demolished the turbine building and damaged 32 of the 49 bays of the Dnieper hydro-electric dam. The city has a street between Ordjonikidzevkij and Zhovtnevyj Districts and a memorial in Zhovtnevyj District dedicated to Red Army Lieutenant Yatsenko (RU (:ru:Яценко, Николай Лаврентьевич)) who commanded the tank, which first entered the city; he and his crew were killed in the battle for the city. Lieutenant Nikolai Lavrent'evich Yatsenko (Яценко Николай Лаврентьевич) (1923–1943) was a platoon commander in 39 Tank Brigade (23rd Tank Corps, South-Western Front); early on 14 October 1943 his tank entered the city and destroyed three enemy tanks in street fighting; Yatsenko was killed. He was posthumously made a Hero of the Soviet Union in 1944. His crew members were: Sergeant Varecun (driver), Lebedev (gunner), and Shepelev (radio-operator). See: ''Zaporizhia Streets – The Mirror of History: brief biographical directory and lists of streets, alleys, boulevards, avenues and streets of the town'' (Вулиці Запоріжжя – дзеркало історії: довідник і короткі бібліографічні списки про вулиці, провулки, проспекти, бульвари та майдани міста), by Uklad O Dutova (Уклад О Дутова), pub Дике Поле, 2008. Commons:Category:Kiev WikiPedia:Kiev Dmoz:Regional Europe Ukraine Provinces Kyiv Oblast Kyiv


Sri Lanka

WikiPedia:Sri Lanka Dmoz:Regional Asia Sri Lanka commons:Sri Lanka


Vienna

Lipscomb offers a handful of study abroad programs, which the university terms global learning. In the mid 1990s a semester-long, study abroad program in Vienna, Austria, was first offered, and is the flagship trip for the university. Several academic departments take short trips to various sites around the world. These trips are usually for fewer than 10 hours credit and a shorter time abroad. The university also partners with the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities


Moscow

located (from February 19, 1967, until the beginning of March, 1967) in the empty apartment of the author, Hans Magnus Enzensberger, in Fregestraße 19, as well as in the studio apartment of the author, Uwe Johnson, who was staying in the USA, at Niedstraße 14 in the Berlin district of Friedenau. After Enzensberger's return from a long study trip to Moscow, they left his apartment and occupied the home of Johnson at Stierstraße 3 for a short time and then finally moved to the second floor of the back of a tenement house in Stephanstraße 60 in the Stephankiez area of the Berlin district of Moabit. Ulrich Enzensberger, ''Die Jahre der Kommune I'', pp. 105, 108 Khan Yusuf allied himself with Tsar Ivan the Terrible, but the former allies eventually became enemies. Khan Yusuf's daughter Sumbecca was Queen of Kazan, and when Kazan was razed by Ivan, Khan Yusuf's daughter was taken as prisoner to Moscow. After Khan Yusuf died, another period of infighting between his descendants followed until the 17th century, when Abdul Mirza, another descendant, converted from Islam to Orthodox Christianity (Orthodox Church) under the name of Dmitry. After the conversion, Tsar Feodor I bestowed upon him the title of Prince Yusupov. The second son of the Steward (Steward (office)) Prince Dmitri Seyushevich Yusupov-Knyazhevo (died 1694) (twice married to Ekaterina Yakovlevna Sumarokova and to Princess Tatiana Fyodorovna Korkodinova (died 1719)) (the first one, Prince Matvei Dmitrievich Yusupov, Steward, died young), Prince Grigori Dmitrievich Yusupov (November 17, 1676, Moscow - September 2, 1730, Moscow), General in Chief and Minister of Defense, was a friend of Peter the Great and helped him with the construction of the Russian Navy. Married to Anna Nikitichna Akinfova (died 1735), daughter of Okolnichi Nikita Ivanovich Akinfov, the couple had, besides Prince Boris, three more children: *Prince Grigori Grigorievich Yusupov (died 1737), Colonel, married firstly to Princess Maria Petrovna Korkodinova, and married secondly to Princess Yevdokia Nikolaievna Shahovskaya, without any issue from both marriages Khan Yusuf allied himself with Tsar Ivan the Terrible, but the former allies eventually became enemies. Khan Yusuf's daughter Sumbecca was Queen of Kazan, and when Kazan was razed by Ivan, Khan Yusuf's daughter was taken as prisoner to Moscow. After Khan Yusuf died, another period of infighting between his descendants followed until the 17th century, when Abdul Mirza, another descendant, converted from Islam to Orthodox Christianity (Orthodox Church) under the name of Dmitry. After the conversion, Tsar Feodor I bestowed upon him the title of Prince Yusupov. The second son of the Steward (Steward (office)) Prince Dmitri Seyushevich Yusupov-Knyazhevo (died 1694) (twice married to Ekaterina Yakovlevna Sumarokova and to Princess Tatiana Fyodorovna Korkodinova (died 1719)) (the first one, Prince Matvei Dmitrievich Yusupov, Steward, died young), Prince Grigori Dmitrievich Yusupov (November 17, 1676, Moscow - September 2, 1730, Moscow), General in Chief and Minister of Defense, was a friend of Peter the Great and helped him with the construction of the Russian Navy. Married to Anna Nikitichna Akinfova (died 1735), daughter of Okolnichi Nikita Ivanovich Akinfov, the couple had, besides Prince Boris, three more children: *Prince Grigori Grigorievich Yusupov (died 1737), Colonel, married firstly to Princess Maria Petrovna Korkodinova, and married secondly to Princess Yevdokia Nikolaievna Shahovskaya, without any issue from both marriages Khan Yusuf allied himself with Tsar Ivan the Terrible, but the former allies eventually became enemies. Khan Yusuf's daughter Sumbecca was Queen of Kazan, and when Kazan was razed by Ivan, Khan Yusuf's daughter was taken as prisoner to Moscow. After Khan Yusuf died, another period of infighting between his descendants followed until the 17th century, when Abdul Mirza, another descendant, converted from Islam to Orthodox Christianity (Orthodox Church) under the name of Dmitry. After the conversion, Tsar Feodor I bestowed upon him the title of Prince Yusupov. The second son of the Steward (Steward (office)) Prince Dmitri Seyushevich Yusupov-Knyazhevo (died 1694) (twice married to Ekaterina Yakovlevna Sumarokova and to Princess Tatiana Fyodorovna Korkodinova (died 1719)) (the first one, Prince Matvei Dmitrievich Yusupov, Steward, died young), Prince Grigori Dmitrievich Yusupov (November 17, 1676, Moscow - September 2, 1730, Moscow), General in Chief and Minister of Defense, was a friend of Peter the Great and helped him with the construction of the Russian Navy. Married to Anna Nikitichna Akinfova (died 1735), daughter of Okolnichi Nikita Ivanovich Akinfov, the couple had, besides Prince Boris, three more children: *Prince Grigori Grigorievich Yusupov (died 1737), Colonel, married firstly to Princess Maria Petrovna Korkodinova, and married secondly to Princess Yevdokia Nikolaievna Shahovskaya, without any issue from both marriages 18th and 19th centuries Prince Boris Grigorievich Yusupov, Chamberlain (Chamberlain (office)) in 1730, General Governor of Moscow in 1738, Senator (June 18, 1695, Moscow - March 3, 1759, Moscow), son of Prince Grigori, was sent to study with the French Navy at the age of 20 and soon became the Tsar's advisor, and eventually served three sovereigns. During the reign of Empress Elizabeth (Elizabeth of Russia) he was appointed head of the Imperial Schools and, in 1756, encouraged the Empress to form the first Public Theatre in St. Petersburg. He married Irina Mikhailovna Zinovyeva (1718 - March 25, 1788), daughter of Steward Mikhail Petrovich Zinoviev, in 1734 and, beside their only male child, bore four preceding daughters: *Princess Yevdokiya Borisovna Yusupova (Yevdokiya Yusupova) May 5 (NS: May 16) 1743, Moscow - July 19 (NS: July 8) 1780, Saint Petersburg), married on March 6, 1774, Mitava (Mittau) (Mitava) (divorced in 1777 or 1778), as his second wife, to Peter von Biron, the last Duke von Kurland (Courland) (1769–1795) and the first Duke von Sagan (Żagań) (1786–1795) (February 15, 1724, Mitava (Mittau) (Jelgava) - January 13, 1800, Schloss Gellenau), without issue 18th and 19th centuries Prince Boris Grigorievich Yusupov, Chamberlain (Chamberlain (office)) in 1730, General Governor of Moscow in 1738, Senator (June 18, 1695, Moscow - March 3, 1759, Moscow), son of Prince Grigori, was sent to study with the French Navy at the age of 20 and soon became the Tsar's advisor, and eventually served three sovereigns. During the reign of Empress Elizabeth (Elizabeth of Russia) he was appointed head of the Imperial Schools and, in 1756, encouraged the Empress to form the first Public Theatre in St. Petersburg. He married Irina Mikhailovna Zinovyeva (1718 - March 25, 1788), daughter of Steward Mikhail Petrovich Zinoviev, in 1734 and, beside their only male child, bore four preceding daughters: *Princess Yevdokiya Borisovna Yusupova (Yevdokiya Yusupova) May 5 (NS: May 16) 1743, Moscow - July 19 (NS: July 8) 1780, Saint Petersburg), married on March 6, 1774, Mitava (Mittau) (Mitava) (divorced in 1777 or 1778), as his second wife, to Peter von Biron, the last Duke von Kurland (Courland) (1769–1795) and the first Duke von Sagan (Żagań) (1786–1795) (February 15, 1724, Mitava (Mittau) (Jelgava) - January 13, 1800, Schloss Gellenau), without issue 18th and 19th centuries Prince Boris Grigorievich Yusupov, Chamberlain (Chamberlain (office)) in 1730, General Governor of Moscow in 1738, Senator (June 18, 1695, Moscow - March 3, 1759, Moscow), son of Prince Grigori, was sent to study with the French Navy at the age of 20 and soon became the Tsar's advisor, and eventually served three sovereigns. During the reign of Empress Elizabeth (Elizabeth of Russia) he was appointed head of the Imperial Schools and, in 1756, encouraged the Empress to form the first Public Theatre in St. Petersburg. He married Irina Mikhailovna Zinovyeva (1718 - March 25, 1788), daughter of Steward Mikhail Petrovich Zinoviev, in 1734 and, beside their only male child, bore four preceding daughters: *Princess Yevdokiya Borisovna Yusupova (Yevdokiya Yusupova) May 5 (NS: May 16) 1743, Moscow - July 19 (NS: July 8) 1780, Saint Petersburg), married on March 6, 1774, Mitava (Mittau) (Mitava) (divorced in 1777 or 1778), as his second wife, to Peter von Biron, the last Duke von Kurland (Courland) (1769–1795) and the first Duke von Sagan (Żagań) (1786–1795) (February 15, 1724, Mitava (Mittau) (Jelgava) - January 13, 1800, Schloss Gellenau), without issue Prince Boris Grigorievich Yusupov, Chamberlain (Chamberlain (office)) in 1730, General Governor of Moscow in 1738, Senator (June 18, 1695, Moscow - March 3, 1759, Moscow), son of Prince Grigori, was sent to study with the French Navy at the age of 20 and soon became the Tsar's advisor, and eventually served three sovereigns. During the reign of Empress Elizabeth (Elizabeth of Russia) he was appointed head of the Imperial Schools and, in 1756, encouraged the Empress to form the first Public Theatre in St. Petersburg. He married Irina Mikhailovna Zinovyeva (1718 - March 25, 1788), daughter of Steward Mikhail Petrovich Zinoviev, in 1734 and, beside their only male child, bore four preceding daughters: *Princess Yevdokiya Borisovna Yusupova (Yevdokiya Yusupova) May 5 (NS: May 16) 1743, Moscow - July 19 (NS: July 8) 1780, Saint Petersburg), married on March 6, 1774, Mitava (Mittau) (Mitava) (divorced in 1777 or 1778), as his second wife, to Peter von Biron, the last Duke von Kurland (Courland) (1769–1795) and the first Duke von Sagan (Żagań) (1786–1795) (February 15, 1724, Mitava (Mittau) (Jelgava) - January 13, 1800, Schloss Gellenau), without issue *Princess Alexandra Borisovna Yusupova (1744–1791), married to Senator Ivan Mikhailovich Izmailov (January 30, 1724 - November 10, 1787) At the age of 42, Prince Boris Nikolaievich Yusupov (June 9, 1794, Moscow - October 25, 1849, Arkhangelskoye Estate), Marshal of the Imperial Court, inherited his immense family wealth, including more than 675,000 acres (2730 km²) of land and more than 40,000 servants inhabiting it, but unlike his father, Prince Boris was not a patron of the arts but, instead, was primarily occupied with business concerns. Prince Boris moved to the Moika palace in St. Petersburg (Also known as Yusupov Palace) with his second wife, Zenaida Ivanovna Narishkina, (who later became Comtesse de Chauveau, Marquise de Serre through her second marriage) (May 18, 1810 - February 26, 1893) (daughter of Ivan Dimitrievitch Narishkin April 17, 1776 - April 15, 1840, Marshal of the Sytchev Nobility in 1829 and later a Chamberlain, and a relative of Peter the Great's mother, and Varvara Ivanovna Narishkina, née Ladomirsky May 17, 1785 - November 26, 1840), and their only son Nikolai. He was previously married without any issue to Princess Praskovia Pavlovna Shcherbatova (July 6, 1795-October 17, 1820). The Arkhangelskoye palace was soon derelict; the animals in the palace zoo were sold and much of the collection moved. Boris focused on the family granaries and developed good relationships with the peasants who worked in them. Prince Boris died in 1849. Prince Boris's only son, Prince Nikolai Borisovich Yusupov (October 12, 1827, Moscow - July 31, 1891, Baden Baden), Marshal of the Imperial Court, was much like his uncle Nicholas I (Nicholas I of Russia), a patron of arts. He first served in the chancery of Nicholas I (Nicholas I of Russia). He bought a large collection of jewellery, including a 36 carat (7.2 g) diamond known as ''Morocco Sultan''. The Prince later spent much of his time in southern Europe because of poor health, while also serving the tsar as a diplomat. While in Europe he bought much to adorn his palace on the Moika, including collections of violins and paintings. He married Countess Tatiana Alexandrovna de Ribeaupierre (June 29, 1828 - January 14, 1879), a lady-in-waiting to the Empress, daughter of Comte Alexandre de Ribeaupierre and wife Ekaterina Mikhailovna Potemkina, another niece of Prince Potemkin (Grigori Aleksandrovich Potemkin). The prince was also a talented musician and composer and was a member of several musical societies. In 1866, he published a book about the Yusupov history ''On the Family of the Yusupov Princes. A Collection of Their Life Stories, Charters and Letters of the Russian Sovereigns to Them''. '''Colonel Pavel Ivanovich Pestel''' ( Dmoz:Regional Europe Russia Administrative Regions Moscow Commons:Category:Moscow Wikipedia:Moscow


Northern Ireland

from the University of Washington's Comparative History of Ideas program and the Jackson School of International Studies. Each student accepted to this program is enrolled in the HFB class, where an intensive semester-long study of literature, history, and the arts focuses on cultures in conflict. Hands For A Bridge » About The Northern Ireland travelers visit Hazelwood Intregrated


Brazil

, Chile, Colombia, Argentina, South Korea, Venezuela, Australia, Malaysia, Peru, Pakistan, and Taiwan. In 1941 Frazier embarked on a year-long study of family life in Brazil, supported by a Guggenheim Fellowship. He spent the next twenty years associated with Howard University where his work focused on the environment of black colleges, especially that of Howard University. One of Frazier's colleagues in his final year at Howard was Nathan Hare


South Africa

or Northern Ireland, where they help foster dialogue about diversity, prejudice, and social change. This group was created in 2001 by teachers Tom Nolet, Francene Watson, and Danny Rock with assistance from the University of Washington's Comparative History of Ideas program and the Jackson School of International Studies. Each student accepted to this program is enrolled in the HFB class, where an intensive semester-long study of literature, history, and the arts focuses on cultures in conflict.<


Russia

and the subsequent Bolshevik takeover. Shortly after becoming a monk, Justin, along with several other students traveled to Petrograd, Russia for a year-long study in the Orthodox Seminary there. It was here the young monk Justin first dedicated himself more fully to Orthodoxy and the monastic way of life. He learned of the great Russian ascetics: St. Anthony (Anthony of Kiev) and Theodosius (Theodosius of Kiev) of the Caves in Kiev, St. Seraphim of Sarov, St. Sergius of Radonezh, St. John of Kronstadt and others. * Romania: Telemea, Brinza * Russia: Bryndza (Брынза) * Turkey: Beyaz peynir 'White cheese' * In the United Kingdom, regulations set forth by the Vehicle and Operator Services Agency under the Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) Regulations 1986 provide that all front windows in front of the B post can have no less than 70 percent VLT. Windscreens are only allowed tinting outside the sweep of the windscreen wipers to a maximum of six inches from the top of the windscreen. "Tinted Windows: Your Questions Answered" (PDF (Portable Document Format)). Vehicle and Operator Services Agency. October 2005. British police (Law enforcement in the United Kingdom) are increasingly cracking down on illegal tinting on vehicles. Rohrer, Finlo. "Tinted windows to the soul." 31 May 2007 BBC News Magazine. * In Russia, window tinting limits are specified in GOST 5727-88. The limit is 75% for the front windshield (a darker stripe no wider than 10&nbsp;cm is allowed at the very top) and 70% for the front side windows. Tinting of back windows is not regulated. In practice, however, bribes (Bribery) are often used to pass inspection or avoid road police tickets even with illegal tint. Правовые основы тонирования * In Belarus, any kind of window tint is illegal. An exception is made for factory tint in vehicles purchased before 1 April 2006. Also exempt are vehicles of cash collectors, KGB and certain officials. Тонировку стекол разрешают только «ограниченному кругу лиц» 2 February 2006 Early life His father, Count Peter von Lacy (Peter Lacy), was a Russian Field Marshal, who belonged to an Irish (Ireland) family, and had followed the fortunes of the exiled James II (James II of England). Franz Moritz was born in St Petersburg and was educated in Germany for a military career, and entered the Austrian service. He served in Italy, Bohemia, Silesia and the Netherlands during the War of the Austrian Succession, was twice wounded, and by the end of the war was a lieutenant-colonel. At the age of twenty-five he became full colonel and chief of an infantry regiment. Rubin Kazan On 13 March 2008, he signed a 5 year deal with the Russian club Rubin Kazan worth € 8.7 million. I'm happy and saidly Karadeniz mentioned that it was sad for him to leave Turkey and also said he chose the club because he felt that if he had joined a big team in Europe his club would not have gotten as much money for him.Gökdeniz signed for Kazan Karadeniz also said that another factor that persuaded him is that the region the club is from has a large Muslim population (Tatarstan) and Karadeniz feels comfortable living amongst people of the same religion as him With the team he won the Russian Premier League 2008 . Critical reaction to the work was mixed, with some enthusiasm in Russia. Berezovsky (Valerian Mikhaylovich Bogdanov-Berezovsky) wrote, "The Fifth Symphony is the weakest of Tchaikovsky's symphonies, but nevertheless it is a striking work, taking a prominent place not only among the composer's output but among Russian works in general. ... the entire symphony seems to spring from some dark spiritual experience." Lüske is the poker mentor for David Williams (David Williams (card player)) (runner-up of the 2004 World Series of Poker) and Russian player Kirill Gerasimov, the runner-up of the World Poker Tour season 1 championship. (Lüske finished in 14th place in that tournament, earning $26,664.) Lüske formed the ''Circle of Outlaws'' group, which promotes young poker players. '''Alexander Galich''' ( Commons:Category:Russia WikiPedia:Russia Dmoz:Regional Europe Russia


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