Places Known For

local opposition


Salaberry-de-Valleyfield

; The A-30 was originally intended to supplant Route 132, crossing Kahnawake to a junction with the Honoré Mercier Bridge. Local opposition to the proposed route coupled with the disruption of the Oka Crisis prompted the decision to change the course of the new autoroute to bypass the Mohawk territory


Sedgemoor

title The Avon (Structural Change) Order 1995 accessdate 9 December 2007 work HMSO In 2007, proposals to abolish the district councils in favour of a single Somerset unitary authority were rejected following local opposition. - 11. Somerset County Council Somerset CC

and Sedgemoor year 1982 publisher Alan Sutton Publishing isbn 0-86299-016-5 page 45 In 1632, Charles I (Charles I of England) sold the Crown's interest in the scheme, and it was taken over by a consortium that included Sir Cornelius Vermuyden, a Dutch (Dutch people) drainage engineer. However, the work was delayed by the English Civil War and later defeated in parliament after local opposition. In 1638, it was reported that nearly


Châteauguay

publisher Wikipedia accessdate 20 February 2012 The A-30 was originally intended to supplant Route 132, crossing Kahnawake to a junction with the Honoré Mercier Bridge. Local opposition to the proposed route coupled with the disruption of the Oka Crisis prompted the decision to change the course of the new autoroute to bypass the Mohawk territory birth_place Châteauguay, QC (Quebec), CAN (Canada) career_start 1998 '''Kim St-Pierre''' (born December 14, 1978 in Châteauguay, Quebec) is a women's ice hockey player. DATE OF BIRTH 1978-12-14 PLACE OF BIRTH Châteauguay, QC (Quebec), CAN (Canada) DATE OF DEATH party Bloc Québécois residence Châteauguay, Quebec profession lawyer


West Somerset

, are North Somerset and Bath and North East Somerset. These unitary authorities include areas that were once part of Somerset before the creation of Avon in 1974. In 2007, proposals to abolish the district councils in favour of a single Somerset unitary authority were rejected following local opposition. ref


Mahdia

de Damas, 1935, p. Local opposition to the authorities began to intensify in September 945, when the Kharijite (Kharijites) insurgents (Insurgency) occupied Tunis, resulting in general pillaging. Paul Sebag, ''op. cit.'', p. 88 With the rise of the Zirid dynasty Tunis gained importance, but the Sunni population tolerated Shi'ite rule less and less, and carried out massacres against the Shi'ite community. In 1048 the Zirid ruler Al-Muizz ibn Badis rejected his city's obedience to the Fatimids and re-established Sunni rites throughout all of Ifriqiya. This decision infuriated the Shi'ite caliph Al-Mustansir Billah (Ma'ad al-Mustansir Billah). To punish the Zirids, he unleashed the Banu Hilal Arab tribe on Ifriqaya; a large part of the country was put to fire, the Zirid capital Kairouan was razed in 1057, and only a few coastal towns, including Tunis and Mahdia, escaped destruction. Exposed to violence from the hostile tribes that settled around the city, the population of Tunis repudiated the authority of the Zirids and swore allegiance to the Hammadid prince El Nacer ibn Alennas (Nasir ibn Alnas), who was based in Béjaïa, in 1059. The governor appointed by Béjaïa, having reestablished order in the country, did not hesitate to free himself from the Hammadids to found the Khourassanid dynasty with Tunis as its capital. This small independent kingdom picked up the threads of trade and commerce with other nations, and brought the region back to peace and prosperity. New capital of Tunisia In 1159, the Almohad 'Abd al-Mumin took Tunis, overthrew the last Khourassanid leader and installed a new government in the kasbah of Tunis. The Almohad conquest marked the beginning of the dominance of the city in Tunisia. Having previously played a minor role behind Kairouan and Mahdia, Tunis was promoted to the rank of provincial capital. In 1228, Governor Abû Zakariya Yahyâ seized power and, a year later, took the title of Emir and founded the Hafsid dynasty. The city became the capital of a Hafsid kingdom stretching towards Tripoli and Fez (Fes). Walls were built to protect the emerging principal town of the kingdom, surrounding the medina, the kasbah and the new suburbs of Tunis. In 1270 the city was taken briefly by Louis IX of France, who was hoping to convert the Hafsid sovereign to Christianity. King Louis easily captured Carthage, but his army soon fell victim to an outbreak of dysentery. Louis himself died before the walls of the capital and the army was forced out. At the same time, driven by the reconquest of Spain, the first Andalusian Muslims and Jews arrived in Tunis and would become of fundamental importance to the economic prosperity of the Hafsid capital and the development of its intellectual life. A powerful fleet was built up under several admirals, or "emirs", of whom the greatest was George, formerly in the service of the Muslim prince of Mahdia. Mainly thanks to him, a series of conquests were made on the African coast (Kingdom of Africa) (1146–1153). Tripoli was captured in 1146 and Cape Bona (Bône) in 1148. These conquests were lost in the reign of Roger's successor William and never formed an integral part of the kingdom. The oldest representations of flags with the crescent are on 14th-century navigational charts, or portolanos, and manuscript of a Franciscan friar. There are discrepancies between these sources as far as the colours of fields or crescents are concerned. However, an account of flags from the Middle East and North Africa by the author of Libro de Conoscimento confirms the widespread use of the crescent on flags in that region. These include: the flags of the kings of Damascus and Lucha (yellow with a white crescent); Cairo (white with a blue crescent); Mahdia in Tunisia (white with a purple crescent); Tunis (white with a black crescent); and Buda (white with a red crescent). Some of the 14 and 15th-century portolanos show the flag of Tunis as red with one or two crescents, which is presented on several portolanos as a symbol of the Ottoman Empire. From 16th to the 18th centuries this flag is usually shown with three white crescents; in 1793 the number of crescents was reduced to one and an eight-pointed star was later added on, when the rule of the Ottoman Empire ended, Turkey was the only Muslim state regarded as a world power at the time. Its flag was known from West Africa to the Far East, and helped to popularize the crescent and star among the Muslim populations of many countries of Asia and Africa. Muhammad Ali, who became Pasha of Egypt in 1805, introduced the first national flag of Egypt, red with three white crescents, each accompanied by a white star. This flag, in turn, influenced the design of the first flag of independent Egypt, which was green with a white crescent and three white stars to symbolize the peaceful co-existence of Muslims, Christians and Jews. During the past two centuries the crescent and star has featured on the flags of other Muslim countries. Operation Torch On 23 October 1942, ''Texas'' embarked upon her first major combat operation when she sortied with Task Group 34.8 (TG 34.8), the Northern Attack Group for Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa. The objective assigned to this group was Mehedia (Mahdia) near Port Lyautey and the port itself. The ships arrived off the assault beaches early in the morning of 8 November and began preparations for the invasion. ''Texas'' transmitted Lieutenant General (Lieutenant General (United States)) Dwight D. Eisenhower's first "Voice of Freedom" broadcast, asking the French not to oppose Allied landings on North Africa. When the troops went ashore, ''Texas'' did not come immediately into action to support them. At that point in the war, amphibious warfare doctrine was still embryonic; and many did not recognize the value of a pre-landing bombardment. Instead, the Army insisted upon attempting surprise. ''Texas'' finally entered the fray early in the afternoon when the Army requested her to destroy an ammunition dump near Port Lyautey. One more gunfire mission was provided on the 10th before the ceasefire on 11 November. Action Report, Battleship Texas, 19 November 1942 http: commons.wikimedia.org wiki File:N._Africa_Nov_1942_gun_firing.jpg Thus, unlike in later operations, she expended only 273 rounds of '''Philip of Mahdia''', of Greek (Greeks) origin, was the emir of Palermo, the second ''ammiratus ammiratorum (Admiral)'', and successor of the great George of Antioch. He was a eunuch who rose through the ranks of the royal ''curia'' in Palermo until he was eventually one of King Roger II's most trusted men. On George's death in year 546 of the Hegira (Hijri year) (AD 1151 or 1152), Roger appointed him to the highest post in the kingdom. In 1060 Pisa engaged in its first battle with Genoa, and the Pisan victory helped to consolidate its position in the Mediterranean. Pope Gregory VII recognized in 1077 the new "laws and customs of the sea" instituted by the Pisans, and Emperor Henry IV granted them the right to name their own consuls, advised by a Council of Elders. This was simply a confirmation of the present situation, because in those years the marquis had already been excluded from power. In 1092 Pope Urban II awarded Pisa supremacy over Corsica and Sardinia, and at the same time raised the town to the rank of archbishopric. Pisa sacked the Tunisian city of Mahdia in 1088. Four years later Pisan and Genoese ships helped Alfonso VI of Castile to force El Cid out of Valencia.


South Kesteven

local opposition to the proposed sites became clear at a public meeting chaired by the local MP (Member of parliament), John Hayes (John Henry Hayes), attended by about 2,000 local residents. Mr Hayes expressed his opposition to the sites within The Deepings, only having Market Deeping as one of the proposed sites within his constituency - the other ones being in Bourne (Bourne, Lincolnshire), Grantham and Stamford (Stamford, Lincolnshire), in the Grantham and Stamford (Grantham and Stamford (UK Parliament constituency)) constituency. The debate and public consultation is ongoing. Education The main secondary school used by the town is the Deepings School (The Deepings School), located in nearby Deeping St. James. This is a well-regarded Academy school with a true-comprehensive intake, built as the Deeping County Secondary Modern School in 1958, becoming a comprehensive in the mid-1970s. The rest of South Kesteven operates the grammar school system, notably at Bourne (Bourne Grammar School). The school had a meningitis (C strain) outbreak in February 1987. The remaining districts of Lincolnshire are Boston (Boston (borough)), East Lindsey, Lincoln (Lincoln, Lincolnshire), South Holland (South Holland, England), South Kesteven, North Kesteven and West Lindsey. They are part of the East Midlands region. Geography The village is approximately three miles to the north-west of Stamford (Stamford, Lincolnshire) and very close to the county border with Lincolnshire (South Kesteven). Just to the north is Tickencote. '''Belton''' is a village in the civil parish of Belton and Manthorpe, in the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. It lies south of Bourne (Bourne, Lincolnshire). Greatford is noted for Greatford Hall, once the home of Francis Willis (Francis Willis (physician)).


Batumi

Tsintsadze officially announced their insubordination to central authorities’ orders. On April 24, Adjaran Senate approved Aslan Abashidze’s proposal to impose a curfew in the region. However, dozens of soldiers of Adjaran leader Aslan Abashidze’s elite special purpose unit began to leave the region and pledged loyalty to the country’s central authorities. Several Adjaran officials also did so. Local opposition resumed series of protests in Batumi, being broken up severely on April 30

leader Aslan Abashidze’s elite special purpose unit began to leave the region and pledged loyalty to the country’s central authorities. Several Adjaran officials also did so. Local opposition resumed series of protests in Batumi, being broken up severely on April 30. In retaliation, Georgia’s central authorities imposed partial economic sanctions against its defiant region in a bid "to exhaust Adjaran regime's resources". Tensions defused between Tbilisi and Batumi

commanders Major General Roman Dumbadze and Murad Tsintsadze officially announced their insubordination to central authorities’ orders. On April 24, Adjaran Senate approved Aslan Abashidze’s proposal to impose a curfew in the region. However, dozens of soldiers of Adjaran leader Aslan Abashidze’s elite special purpose unit began to leave the region and pledged loyalty to the country’s central authorities. Several Adjaran officials also did so. Local opposition resumed series of protests


Aylmer, Quebec

., Pink Rd. Aylmer is connected to Tunney's Pasture and Westboro in Ottawa by the Champlain Bridge (Champlain Bridge (Ottawa)), at the southeast corner. It has been proposed to build an extension from Autoroute 50 (Quebec Autoroute 50) in Gatineau that would come though Chelsea and central Aylmer to become a bridge between Deschênes and Brittania, but the plan is only tentative, mainly due to strong local opposition from the Brittania sector. Aylmer is home to an effective and generally well-maintained network of bicycle paths that encircle the central portion of the area and run past many scenic locations, such as the Aylmer Marina and the Deschênes Rapids. The bike path system is maintained by the National Capital Commission. Public transit Public transit is provided by the Société de transport de l'Outaouais (Société de Transport de l'Outaouais) or STO, which runs twelve bus lines through the region (although many only operate during rush hour). The STO has been criticized by Aylmer residents—particularly youth—for not providing enough service to the area, and for not providing enough inter-sector bus lines (the eastern terminus for most Aylmer lines is in the Rideau Centre in downtown Ottawa). The STO is planning a bus rapid transit system known as Rapibus that would connect the Hull and Gatineau sectors, with the possibility of an expansion to Aylmer. The railroad bedding still exists from Aylmer's now-defunct rail line, and pressure has been put on the STO to set up a light rail system in Gatineau that could connect to Ottawa's O-Train network via the Prince of Wales Bridge. If this were to happen, Aylmer could theoretically be served by light rail as well, but at present this appears highly unlikely. Politics Federal In terms of population, Aylmer makes up about one third of the riding (Electoral district (Canada)) of Hull—Aylmer, which has elected a Liberal (Liberal Party of Canada) member of parliament in every federal election since its conception in 1984 — its predecessors, the ridings of Hull and Wright, in place from 1892 to 1984, also only ever elected Liberals. This, however, changed when the riding elected NDP MP Nycole Turmel to the House of Commons (Canadian House of Commons) in the 2011 federal election (Canadian federal election, 2011). Municipal In the 2005 Gatineau municipal election, Aylmer voters showed particularly strong support for current mayor Marc Bureau (Marc Bureau (politician)), over incumbent and former mayor of "old" Hull Yves Ducharme. Similar voting patterns appeared in the sectors of Buckingham (Buckingham, Quebec) and Masson-Angers, the other two "outlying" regions of Gatineau. This could be due to a perception among residents that the Ducharme administration was more focused on the urban core of the new city, as opposed to the periphery, as well as the rapid development of green-spaces (Green belt) into residential subdivisions (Subdivision (land)). However, six months after the November election, residents are showing the highest level of dissatisfaction with the Bureau administration out of all the sectors, citing Aylmer's being left out of municipal processes, poor quality of municipal services, and little to no action to halt suburban sprawl. Interestingly, Masson-Angers and Buckingham residents are presently showing the most support for the new government. Recently, the City of Gatineau administration had plans to reuse a former landfill site on Cook Road in the north end of the sector to build a new composting plant. A deal was planned with a non-profit organisation called La Ressourcerie to operate the site. However, local residents are strongly opposed with health and environmental concerns especially due to the past of the landfill site. Residents raise stink over Gatineau composting plant Despite displaying their fierce opposition, which included acts of intimidation and threats towards some councillors, at a Gatineau City Council Meeting, Mayor Marc Bureau (Marc Bureau (politician)) mentioned that he will still build the plant at the Cook site, and that according to him it was the best possible site. Duquette, Patrick, Gatineau fera son compostage dans l'ancien depotoir Cook, (Gatineau will do its compositing plant at former Cook landfill site), Le Droit, Ottawa, September 20, 2006, page 3. He later added that he will study other possibilities for the plant. Aylmer's three wards (Ward (politics)) are presently represented on the Gatineau city council by Stefan Psenak, André Laframboise and Alain Riel. Amalgamation and de-Amalgamation In 2002 the City of Aylmer became a part of Gatineau when the then-Parti Québécois government forcibly merged several clusters of cities and metropolitan areas (Census Metropolitan Area) throughout Québec. Residents of Aylmer were particularly against the amalgamation, citing fears of reduced municipal services, more suburban development, and a loss of cultural identity, as well as geographic differences (Hull and Gatineau arguably constitute a region of conurbation, whereas Aylmer was at the time separated by an expanse of sparsely inhabited green space). A movement was started to halt the "forced fusion" of five cities surrounding Gatineau. The movement had particularly strong support in Aylmer. Signs reading "''Je me souviendrai des fusions forcées''" (literally, "I will remember forced fusions," a play (word play) on Québec's motto "''Je me souviens''") were a common sight. thumb An example of an Aylmer street, built before extensive housing developments. (Image:A quiet aylmer street.jpg) When the Québec Liberal Party (Parti libéral du Québec) won the 2003 provincial election, the newly amalgamated former cities were given the opportunity to demerge. A referendum was held to decide the fate of the City of Gatineau which required a double vote: at least 35% of eligible voters from a given sector had to cast ballots, and more than 50% of these had to be in favour of de-amalgamation. Aylmer voters chose to separate from Gatineau but not enough ballots were cast, meaning Aylmer remained a sector of the larger city. The voting outcome itself was done in such a way that even if Aylmer succeeded in de-amalgamating from Gatineau, they would only do so in name. The de-amalgamation claimed that once Aylmer was its own area once again, it would have to pay for all its own changes, while Gatineau would still be in control of the administration. This meant that the sector of Aylmer would receive no support from the administration that determined what was built where, but would still have to contribute 100% to the costs of the changes voted by the city of Gatineau. Prior to the merger, Aylmer's residents and municipal laws had strongly opposed extensive construction programs. Following the amalgamation, many of the sector's prized green spaces were cut down for residential construction. Ex-Aylmer neighbourhoods like Wychwood and Village Lucerne have seen their undeveloped spaces sold to contractors. As a result of this unchecked development, there is a strong resentment of the current municipal administration among Aylmer Sector citizens. '''Boulevard Saint-Raymond''' is a major boulevard located in Gatineau, Quebec. It starts at Boulevard Saint-Joseph and ends at Boulevard Alexandre-Tache (Boulevard Alexandre-Taché (Gatineau)) just west of the limits between the Hull (Hull, Quebec) and Aylmer (Aylmer, Quebec) sectors. Before 2003, it ended at Chemin Pink but since then it includes the former section of Chemin de la Montagne Sud. In Gatineau, Route 148 is concurrent with Autoroute 50 (Quebec Autoroute 50) from Maloney Boulevard (Boulevard Maloney (Gatineau)) until the terminus of Autoroute 50 at des Allumettières Boulevard (Boulevard des Allumettières (Gatineau)). Route 148 then continues west on des Allumettières Boulevard (Boulevard des Allumettières (Gatineau)) towards Aylmer (Aylmer, Quebec). Prior to the opening of des Allumettières Boulevard (Boulevard des Allumettières (Gatineau)) in 2007 Route 148 was concurrent with Autoroute 5 (Quebec Autoroute 5) between the Autoroute 50 junction and Saint-Raymond Boulevard (Boulevard Saint-Raymond (Gatineau)). * Pontiac (Pontiac, Quebec) * '''Gatineau''' - (''Aylmer (Aylmer, Quebec) '' '''Gatineau''' '' Masson-Angers (Masson-Angers, Quebec)'') * Lochaber-Partie-Ouest (Lochaber-Partie-Ouest, Quebec)


Adjara

General Roman Dumbadze and Murad Tsintsadze officially announced their insubordination to central authorities’ orders. On April 24, Adjaran Senate approved Aslan Abashidze’s proposal to impose a curfew in the region. However, dozens of soldiers of Adjaran leader Aslan Abashidze’s elite special purpose unit began to leave the region and pledged loyalty to the country’s central authorities. Several Adjaran officials also did so. Local opposition resumed series of protests in Batumi


Kahnawake

accessdate 20 February 2012 The A-30 was originally intended to supplant Route 132, crossing Kahnawake to a junction with the Honoré Mercier Bridge. Local opposition to the proposed route coupled with the disruption of the Oka Crisis prompted the decision to change the course of the new autoroute to bypass the Mohawk territory section from the existing A-30 to Route 132 in Candiac will be redesignated Autoroute 930 (Quebec Autoroute 930) once construction ends in 2012. 86 15px (Image:Qc207.svg) R-207 (Quebec Route 207) 15px (Image:Qc221.svg) R-221 (Quebec Route 221) Kahnawake, Saint-Rémi (Saint-Rémi, Quebec), Saint-Isidore (Saint-Isidore, Montérégie, Quebec) group3 '''Adjacent communities''' list3 '''Acton Vale (Acton Vale, Quebec):''' CFID 103.7 (CFID-FM) • '''Akwesasne:''' CKON 97.3 (CKON-FM) • '''Châteauguay''': CHAI 101.9 (CHAI-FM) • '''Joliette''': CJLM 103.5 (CJLM-FM) • '''Kahnawake''': CKKI 89.9 (CKKI-FM) • CKRK 103.7 (CKRK-FM) • '''Lachute''': CJLA 104.9 (CJLA-FM) • '''Laval (Laval, Quebec)''': CJLV 1570 (CJLV) • CFGL 105.7 (CFGL-FM) • '''Longueuil''': CHMP 98.5 (CHMP-FM) • CHAA 103.3 (CHAA-FM) • '''Saint-Constant (Saint-Constant, Quebec)''': CJMS 1040 (CJMS) • '''Saint-Hyacinthe (Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec)''': CFEI 106.5 (CFEI-FM) • '''Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu''': CFZZ 104.1 (CFZZ-FM) • '''Saint-Jérôme (Saint-Jérôme, Quebec)''': CIME 103.9 (CIME-FM) • '''Salaberry-de-Valleyfield''': CKOD 103.1 (CKOD-FM) • '''Vaudreuil-Dorion''': CJVD 100.1 (CJVD-FM) group4 Adjacent markets Raids In the early morning hours of October 16, 1780, Lieutenant Houghton of the British Army's 53rd Regiment of Foot and a single Grenadier, along with 300 Mohawk (Mohawk nation) warriors from the Kahnawake Reserve (Kahnawake) in the British province of Quebec (province of Quebec (1763-1791)), attacked and burned the towns of Royalton (Royalton, Vermont), Sharon (Sharon, Vermont) and Tunbridge (Tunbridge, Vermont) along the White River in eastern Vermont. This raid was launched in conjunction with other raids led by Major Christopher Carleton of the 29th Regiment of Foot along the shores of Lake Champlain and Lake George (Lake George (New York)) and Sir John Johnson of the King's Royal Regiment of New York in the Mohawk River valley, to attempt to drive the Vermonters out of Vermont and to burn anything of military value that might be used by the Green Mountain Boys if they decided to attack Montreal or Quebec City again. Four Vermont settlers were killed and twenty six were taken prisoner to Quebec. CKGM files for frequency swap On September 7, 2011, the CRTC announced the applicants for the 690 kHz frequency previously occupied by CINF. Among these included Bell Media, who plan on using 690 as a new frequency for CKGM. Broadcasting Notice of Consultation CRTC 2011-571, September 7, 2011. The reasoning for the swap is to take advantage of 690's around-the-clock clear-channel (Clear-channel station) frequency, especially during nighttime hours when most sporting events, especially hockey, takes place; at 990, the station is forced to broadcast at a lower power at night, broadcasting directionally towards the north to protect CBW and CBY, significantly decreasing its coverage area in the suburban areas and on the South Shore. Other frequencies CKGM considered moving to was 940 kHz, though doing so would take six months to make the move, as opposed to three months if CKGM is awarded 690; and 600 kHz (formerly used by CINW's predecessor, CIQC, before moving to 940 in 1999), but it would require building new towers, and the only suitable site for broadcast is in Kahnawake, on land owned by competing broadcaster, Cogeco. Fagstein: "Clear Channel Cagematch: CKGM frequency change", November 3, 2011. *Gesgapegiag (Gesgapegiag, Quebec) :fr:Gesgapegiag - Mi'kmaq (Mi'kmaq people) *Kahnawake - Mohawk (Mohawk nation) Quebec Kanesatake - Mohawk (Mohawk nation) The latter name was also given to a northern settlement on the St. Lawrence River opposite Lachine (later Montreal). Also known as ''Kahnawake'', the Canadian settlement was founded by 1718 as a Jesuit mission for the Iroquois converts to Christianity who wanted to withdraw from 'moral corruption' by their pagan kinsmen. '''CKRK-FM''' is an English-language (English language) Canadian (Canada) radio station located in the Kahnawake Mohawk Territory (Mohawk nation), a First Nations reserve (Indian reserve) near Montreal, Quebec.


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