Places Known For

international involvement


Nasiriyah

-WEST''’) — 250 W International involvement (1991 to present) Portugal was a founding member of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), and, although it had scarce forces, it played a key role in the European approaches. After 1991 Portugal committed several Infantry and Airlanding battalions to international operations. The Portuguese Army keeps soldiers in Bosnia (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Kosovo, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia) and East Timor (around 6,000 men overall) and it has 128 Guardsmen military police in Iraq (Nasiriyah) under control of the Italian Army. Portugal also sent its soldiers to Afghanistan, which controlled the Kabul airport during 2005. As international observers, Portuguese were also in Croatia, Georgia (Georgia (country)) and Western Sahara. November *November 12 - In Nasiriya, Iraq (Nasiriyah), at least 23 people, among them the first Italian (Italy) casualties of the 2003 Iraq war are killed in a suicide bomb attack on an Italian police base. *November 26 - UK (United Kingdom) foreign minister Jack Straw (Jack Straw (politician)) pays a brief, surprise visit to Iraq. His Memorial at Basra, Iraq can be found at panel numbers 16 and 62. The Basra Memorial was originally sited within Basra War Cemetery but in 1997 the Memorial was moved by presidential decree of Saddam Hussain. The move, carried out by the authorities in Iraq, involved a considerable amount of manpower, transport costs and sheer engineering on their part, the Memorial has been re-erected in its entirety. The Basra Memorial is now located 32 kilometres along the road to Nasiriyah, in the middle of what was a major battleground during the Gulf War. The Memorial consists of a roofed colonnade of white Indian stone, 80 metres long, with an obelisk 16 metres high as the central feature. The names are engraved on slate panels fixed to the wall behind the columns. More than 40,000 British, Indian and West African dead who died in the operations in Mesopotamia from the Autumn of 1914 to the end of August 1921 are commemorated on the Memorial. In late August 2005, violence occurred in Najaf, Nasiriyah, Diwaniyah, and Sadr City (Baghdad). The Shi'ite infighting was between the supporters of cleric Muqtada al-Sadr and the Badr Organization, who are backed by the Supreme Council for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq (SCIRI). Both sides blame each other for the violence. Some Shi'a National Assembly (National Assembly of Iraq) members and ministers suspended their membership in the council because of the violence. Since Sadr's Mahdi Army were expelled from the city of Najaf, fighting between rival Shi'a groups has ceased. The Italian Army did not take part in combat operations of the 2003 Second Gulf War (Iraq War), dispatching troops only after May 1, 2003 - when major combat operations were declared over by the U.S. President (President of the United States) George W. Bush. Subsequently Italian troops arrived in the late summer of 2003, and began patrolling Nasiriyah and the surrounding area. On 26 May 2006, Italian foreign minister Massimo d'Alema announced that the Italian forces would be reduced to 1,600 by June. As of June 2006 32 Italian troops have been killed in Iraq - with the greatest single loss of life coming on November 12, 2003 - a suicide car bombing of the Italian Carabinieri Corps HQ left a dozen Carabinieri, five Army soldiers, two Italian civilians, and eight Iraqi civilians dead. Shammar in Iraq Under the leadership of Banu Mohamad, known as Al Jarba, there was a massive exodus into Iraq. Many of the Shammar in Iraq gave up the nomadic life to settle in major cities, especially the Jazirah (Al Jazira, Mesopotamia) plain, the area between the Tigris and Euphrates from Baghdad to Mosul. Droughts triggered several migrations of Shammar into Iraq, which, according to the Ottoman census upon its annexation, had only 1.5 million inhabitants. Today, Alhuchaim tribes of Samawa have a large majority of Shammar. Clans from Abda in Ain Tamur, Hacham of Alaslam in Souq Alshiokh, Aladhadh of Alaslam in the city of Nasiriyah are a few examples of Shammar outside of the Jazirah. The Shammar took over the Jazirah after displasing Al-Ubaid (Al-Ubaid (tribe)) tribe. According to Sheikh Abdullah Humaid Alyawar, the son of the sheikh of Shammar, in Iraq the total population of Shammar is estimated to be 1.5 million.


Abkhazia

; ref International involvement The UN has played various roles during the conflict and peace process: a military role through its observer mission (UNOMIG); dual diplomatic roles through the Security Council and the appointment of a Special Envoy, succeeded by a Special Representative to the Secretary-General; a humanitarian role (UNHCR and UNOCHA); a development role (UNDP); a human rights role (UNHCHR); and a low-key capacity and confidence-building role ( United


East Timor

Australian Navy, ''Navy Marks 109th Birthday With Historic Changes To Battle Honours'' Royal Australian Navy, ''Royal Australian Navy Ship Unit Battle Honours'' International involvement (1991 to present) Portugal was a founding member of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), and, although it had scarce forces, it played a key role in the European approaches. After 1991 Portugal committed several Infantry and Airlanding battalions to international operations. The Portuguese Army keeps soldiers in Bosnia (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Kosovo, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia) and East Timor (around 6,000 men overall) and it has 128 Guardsmen military police in Iraq (Nasiriyah) under control of the Italian Army. Portugal also sent its soldiers to Afghanistan, which controlled the Kabul airport during 2005. As international observers, Portuguese were also in Croatia, Georgia (Georgia (country)) and Western Sahara. '''Not Drowning, Waving''' (styled as '''not drowning, waving''') were a musical group formed in Melbourne, Australia in 1983 by David Bridie and John Phillips. Their music combined elements of rock (rock and roll), ambient music and world music; their lyrics dealt with characteristically Australian topics: word-pictures of landscapes and people, the seasons, and some political issues – such as Indonesia's invasion of East Timor. The group released nine albums and soundtracks until disbanding in 1994, they briefly reformed in 2001, 2003 and 2005–2006. From 2005 to 2007, they issued two compilation albums and a live album. Not Drowning, Waving won the 'Best Independent Release' at the ARIA Music Awards of 1992 for ''Proof'', their soundtrack for the 1991 film of the same name (Proof (1991 film)). In 1991, Bridie and fellow members of Not Drowning, Waving, formed a side-project, My Friend The Chocolate Cake to play more acoustic (acoustic music)-based material. * DPRK - Workers' Party of Korea (WPK) * East Timor - Frente Revolucionária de Timor-Leste Independente (FRETILIN) * Ecuador - Partido Comunista de Ecuador (PCE) The '''Bobonaro''' district ( Commons:Category:East Timor WikiPedia:East Timor Dmoz:Regional Asia East Timor


Kosovo

for civilian ownership in most parts of the United States. Recently, a batch of Type 56s were given to Malta. International involvement (1991 to present) Portugal was a founding member of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), and, although it had scarce forces, it played a key role in the European approaches. After 1991 Portugal committed several Infantry and Airlanding battalions to international operations. The Portuguese Army keeps soldiers in Bosnia (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Kosovo, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia) and East Timor (around 6,000 men overall) and it has 128 Guardsmen military police in Iraq (Nasiriyah) under control of the Italian Army. Portugal also sent its soldiers to Afghanistan, which controlled the Kabul airport during 2005. As international observers, Portuguese were also in Croatia, Georgia (Georgia (country)) and Western Sahara. ''Stern'' has lost four journalists killed while reporting. In January 1995, Jochen Piest was killed by a sniper near the Chechen capital of Grozny. Gabriel Grüner and Volker Krämer were killed near Dulje, Kosovo. November 2001 saw the death of Volker Handloik in an ambush in northern Afghanistan. A NATION CHALLENGED: THE NEWS MEDIA; Two French Radio Journalists and a German Are Killed in Taliban Ambush of a Rebel Force - New York Times From 1963 - 1974, security intelligence services dealt with a series of domestic and foreign political events. At home, there were political confrontation both before and after the Brioni Plenum (1966), liberal flareups and massive leftist Students' demonstrations in Belgrade in 1968, ''Hrvatsko proljeće'' (Croatian Spring) or "MASPOK" (mass movement) in Croatia in 1971, an incursion of a group of nationalists (Raduša, 1972), and a revival of nationalism in Kosovo, Serbia, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia), and Slovenia. The most significant event abroad was the invasion of the Warsaw Pact troops into Czechoslovakia in 1968. On February 17, 2008, individual members of the Assembly of Kosovo (acting in personal capacity and not binding the Assembly itself (International Court of Justice advisory opinion on Kosovo's declaration of independence#Opinion issued)), declared that Kosovo is independent from Serbia and subsequently adopted a constitution, which came into effect on 15 June 2008. In the Balkans, the '''Ashkali''' (also ''Hashkali'', ''Aškalije'' (Ашкалије), ''Haškalije'' (Хашкалије)) and '''Egyptians''' (Balkan Egyptians, Jevgs, ''Egjiptjant'' or ''Gjupci'') are Albanian (Albanian language)-speaking ethnic minorities (recognized communities) of Kosovo and Albania. Observers consider them Albanized (Albanisation) Romanies (Romani people), but they do not self-identify as such. Prior to the Kosovo War of 1999, Albanized Roma registered themselves as Albanians. Now they are divided by identifying with two different groups, although the people share a culture, traditions and language (Albanian). thumb 140px right Melihate Ajeti (File:Meli 1.JPG) '''Melihate Ajeti''' (Serbian Cyrillic: Мелихате Ајети) (born October 9, 1935 in Pristina, Kingdom of Yugoslavia, died March 26, 2005 in Pristina, Kosovo, Serbia and Montenegro) was a Kosovar Albanian (Albanians in Kosovo) actress. Čoček is especially popular among the Muslim Rom and Albanian populations of Kosovo, South Serbia and the Republic of Macedonia.


Republic of Macedonia

, Andorra, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Cyprus, France, Greece, Italy, Republic of Macedonia, Malta, Monaco, Montenegro, San Marino, Serbia, Slovenia, Spain and Turkey International involvement (1991 to present) Portugal was a founding member of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), and, although it had scarce forces, it played a key role in the European approaches. After 1991 Portugal committed several Infantry and Airlanding battalions to international operations. The Portuguese Army keeps soldiers in Bosnia (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Kosovo, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia) and East Timor (around 6,000 men overall) and it has 128 Guardsmen military police in Iraq (Nasiriyah) under control of the Italian Army. Portugal also sent its soldiers to Afghanistan, which controlled the Kabul airport during 2005. As international observers, Portuguese were also in Croatia, Georgia (Georgia (country)) and Western Sahara. '''Tetovo''' ( '''Ferid Muhić''' (born 1944 in Zavidovići, Bosnia and Herzegovina) is a Professor of Philosophy at University Sts. Cyril and Methodius, Skopje, Republic of Macedonia. He started his academic career as Assistant at the Institute for Sociological Research in Skopje in 1970. He entered the Department of Philosophy as Assistant in 1974; Associate Professor 1976-1980; Full-time Professor 1980-present. Visiting Professor in International Institute of Islamic Thought and Civilization, Kuala Lumpur; Florida State University; Syracuse University, New York; Sorbonne 8, Paris; and several universities in Southern-East Europe. Main professional specialties: contemporary philosophy, cultural anthropology, aesthetics and political philosophy. Aromanians (w:Aromanians) are a distinct ethnic group currently living mainly in Southeastern Europe (w:Southeastern Europe), especially Greece (w:Greece) and Macedonia (w:Republic of Macedonia). The Aromanians are closely related to the Romanian people (w:Romanians), both being descendants from the Latin peoples which lived in Southeastern Europe since the time of the Roman Empire (w:Roman Empire). The Aromanian language (w:Aromanian language), which is spoken by around 500,000 people internationally, is the closest language to Romanian (w:Romanian language). Six of the suspects are Swiss (w:Switzerland) nationals, two come from Serbia and Montenegro (w:Serbia and Montenegro), one comes from Italy (w:Italy), two from the Republic of Macedonia (w:Republic of Macedonia), one from the Dominican Republic (w:Dominican Republic) and one from Bosnia and Hercegovina (w:Bosnia and Hercegovina). All live in Zurich.


Bosnia and Herzegovina

s of Brunei, Cyprus, Fiji, Mauritius and Solomon Islands International involvement (1991 to present) Portugal was a founding member of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), and, although it had scarce forces, it played a key role in the European approaches. After 1991 Portugal committed several Infantry and Airlanding battalions to international operations. The Portuguese Army keeps soldiers in Bosnia (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Kosovo, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia) and East Timor (around 6,000 men overall) and it has 128 Guardsmen military police in Iraq (Nasiriyah) under control of the Italian Army. Portugal also sent its soldiers to Afghanistan, which controlled the Kabul airport during 2005. As international observers, Portuguese were also in Croatia, Georgia (Georgia (country)) and Western Sahara. '''Jure Francetić''' (3 July 1912 — 27 28 December 1942) was an World War II Ustaše Commissioner of Bosnia and Herzegovina, ''Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Second World War'' by Enver Redžić (pp. 73, 74), Routledge, 2005 ISBN 0714656259, ISBN 9780714656250 ''"On 23 July 1941 the headquarters of the NDH Ustasha police sent an order to all regions and to Jure Francetić, Ustasha Commisioner of Bosnia and Herzegovina, to begin with arrest and transportation of Jews, Serbs and Communists to the Gospić concentration camp... T he Serbian population in eastern Bosnia was also subjected to all manner of Ustasha crimes directed from the highest Ustasha circles in Sarajevo. In this regard, Pavelić's authorized delegates, Francetić, Father Božidar Brale and Professor Hadžić, led the way."'' responsible for the massacre of Bosnian Serbs and Jews (Bosnian Jews). ''Renewed Survival: Jewish Community Life in Croatia'' by Nila Ginger Hofman (p. 35), Lexington Books, 2006; ISBN 0739113305, ISBN 9780739113301 '''Čelinac''' (Cyrillic: Челинац) is a town and municipality in north-west Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina. The municipality lies about


Croatia

''': Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. International involvement (1991 to present) Portugal was a founding member of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization), and, although it had scarce forces, it played a key role in the European approaches. After 1991 Portugal committed several Infantry and Airlanding battalions to international operations. The Portuguese Army keeps soldiers in Bosnia (Bosnia and Herzegovina), Kosovo, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia) and East Timor (around 6,000 men overall) and it has 128 Guardsmen military police in Iraq (Nasiriyah) under control of the Italian Army. Portugal also sent its soldiers to Afghanistan, which controlled the Kabul airport during 2005. As international observers, Portuguese were also in Croatia, Georgia (Georgia (country)) and Western Sahara. Dan Luger was born in Chiswick and is the son of a Croatian father (head of Croatia's rugby federation) and Czech (Czechs) mother. Dan was firstly educated at Ashton House School, then moving on to Latymer Upper School in Hammersmith joining local club Richmond (Richmond F.C.) as a junior. On 30 June 1941, Moljević published a booklet with the title ''On Our State and Its Borders''. He proposed a future federal Yugoslav (Yugoslavia) state composed of three units: Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia. The Serbian unit was to include Bosnia, Mostar (Herzegovina), parts of Croatia (Metković, Šibenik, Zadar, Ploče, Dubrovnik, Karlovac, Osijek, Vinkovci, Vukovar), as well as Pécs (Hungary), Timişoara (Romania), Vidin and Kyustendil (Bulgaria), the entire Macedonia and North Albania. The Moljević programme envisaged autonomy or special status for the city of Dubrovnik and surrounding areas and the Croat dominated area of Western Herzegovina, within the structure of the internal Serbian entity. Quotes *''One must take the opportunity of the war conditions and at a suitable moment take hold of the territory marked on the map, cleanse it before anybody notices and with strong battalions occupy the key places: Osijek, Vinkovci, Slavonski Brod, Knin, Šibenik, Mostar, Metković and the territory surrounding these cities, freed of non-Serb (Serbs) elements. The guilty must be promptly punished and the others deported - the Croats to Croatia, the Muslims to Turkey or perhaps Albania - while the vacated territory is settled with Serb refugees now located in Serbia.'' Eurojust is very active in establishing co-operation agreements allowing the exchange of judicial information and personal data. Agreements were concluded with Europol, OLAF, CEPOL (European Police College), the European Judicial Training Network, UNODC (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime), Iber-RED, Iceland, Norway, the USA, Croatia, Switzerland, and Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia). Liaison Prosecutors from Norway, the USA and Croatia are permanently based at Eurojust. In addition to co-operation agreements, Eurojust also maintains a network of contact points worldwide.


Afghanistan

Commons:Category:Afghanistan WikiPedia:Afghanistan Dmoz:Regional Asia Afghanistan


Ukraine

There are plans to re-introduce two herds in Germany European bison reintroduction in the Rothaargebirge and in Oostvaardersplassen Nature Reserve in Flevoland (Netherlands). Zoos in 30 countries also have quite a few animals. There were 3,000 individuals (as of 2000), all descended from only 12 individuals. Because of their limited genetic pool, they are considered highly vulnerable to illnesses like foot and mouth disease. '''Proso millet''' (''Panicum miliaceum'') is also known as '''common millet''', '''hog millet''' or '''white millet'''. Both the wild ancestor and the location of domestication of proso millet are unknown, but it first appears as a crop in both Transcaucasia (South Caucasus) and China about 7,000 years ago, suggesting it may have been domesticated independently in each area. It is still extensively cultivated in India, Russia, Ukraine, the Middle East, Turkey and Romania. In the United States, proso is mainly grown for birdseed. It is sold as health food, and due to its lack of gluten, it can be included in the diets of people who cannot tolerate wheat. Maces were very common in eastern Europe, especially medieval Poland, Ukraine Official Symbols of the President of Ukraine: The presidential mace and Russia. Eastern European maces often had pear shaped heads. These maces were also used by Moldavian king Stephen the Great who used the mace in some of his wars (see Bulawa). Israel has the independent capability of launching reconnaissance satellites into orbit, a capability shared with Russia, the United States, the United Kingdom, France, South Korea, Italy, Germany, the People's Republic of China, India, Japan, Brazil and Ukraine. Israeli security industries developed both the satellites (Ofeq) and the launchers (Shavit). In North America and the United Kingdom, it is customarily worn on the left hand ring finger. Similar traditions purportedly date to classical times, dating back from an early usage reportedly referring to the fourth finger of the left hand as containing the ''vena amoris'' or "vein of love". This custom may have its origins in an ancient Egyptian myth that the finger contained a vein leading directly to the heart, or it may simply be because the heart lies slightly to the left side of the body. In Ukraine, it is customary for the ring to be worn on the right hand. In Germany the ring is worn on the left hand while engaged, but moved to the right hand when married. In Poland, the engagement ring and wedding band are traditionally worn on the right hand but modern practice varies considerably. Judges from Russia, the People's Republic of China, Poland, Ukraine, and France placed the Russians first; judges from the United States, Canada, Germany, and Japan gave the nod to the Canadians. The International Skating Union announced a day after the competition that it would conduct an "internal assessment" into the judging decision. On February 15 the ISU and IOC, in a joint press conference, announced that it would award a second gold medal to Salé and Pelletier, and that Marie-Reine Le Gougne, the French judge implicated in collusion, was guilty of "misconduct" and was suspended effective immediately. Berezhnaya and Sikharulidze were allowed to keep their gold medal as well. * A Benedictine abbey is founded at Sherborne (Sherborne Abbey). * St. Volodimir, Prince of Kiev Rus (modern Ukraine, Russia and Belarus), baptizes his country In April 1902 he became a private senior lecturer at the University of Vienna. In 1906 he was appointed assistant at the Technical University of Vienna. In 1907 he became associate professor and in 1908 full professor of mathematics at the University of Chernivtsi (Russian (Russian language) ''Черновцы''), Ukraine. From 1912 to 1913 he was dean of this faculty. In 1917 his political views led him to be forcibly ejected by the Government and he fled to Bohemia (''Moravska''). After the First World War (World War I) he became a member of the University Commission under the Slovene Provincial Government and helped establish the first Slovene university at Ljubljana, and was elected its first chancellor. In the same year he was appointed professor of mathematics at the Faculty of Arts. After the Second World War he joined the Faculty of Natural Science and Technology (FNT). He retired in 1957 after having lectured in mathematics for 40 years. * May 4 – Pope Alexander IV issues the papal bull ''Licet ecclesiae catholicae'', constituting the Order of Saint Augustine at Lecceto Monastery (Monastery of the Holy Saviour). * The city of Lviv, in present-day Ukraine, is founded by Danylo King of Rus. * Theodore II Lascaris, Byzantine Emperor (in exile in the Empire of Nicaea), successfully concludes a military campaign started a year earlier to recover Thrace from the Bulgarians. Vladimir's father was the prince Sviatoslav (Sviatoslav I of Kiev) of the Rurik dynasty. Vladimir I (Grand Prince of Kiev), Brittannica Encyclopedia After the death of his father in 972, Vladimir, who was then prince of Novgorod, was forced to flee to Scandinavia in 976 after his brother Yaropolk (Yaropolk I of Kiev) had murdered his other brother Oleg (Oleg of Drelinia) and conquered Rus (Kievan Rus'). In Sweden with the help from his relative Ladejarl Håkon Sigurdsson, ruler of Norway, assembled a Varangian army and reconquered Novgorod from Yaropolk (Yaropolk I of Kiev). Den hellige Vladimir av Kiev (~956–1015), Roman Catholicism in Norway Den katolske kirke


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