Places Known For

independent power


Deira

kingdoms also existed in this region, including Craven, Elmet, Rheged, and Gododdin. A native British kingdom, later called the Kingdom of Strathclyde, survived as an independent power into the 10th century in the area which became modern-day Dunbartonshire and Clydesdale. Yorke ''Conversion of Britain'' p. 38 To the north-west of Strathclyde lay the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata, and to the north-east a small number of Pictish kingdoms. Yorke ''Kings and Kingdoms'' pp. 83–86 Further north still lay the great Pictish kingdom of Fortriu, which after the Battle of Dun Nechtain in 685 came to be the strongest power in the northern half of Britain. Charles-Edwards "'Continuation of Bede" ''Seanchas'' pp. 137–145 Woolf "Dun Nechtain" ''Scottish Historical Review'' pp. 182–201 Woolf "Verturian hegemony" ''Mercia'' pp. 106–112 The Irish had always had contacts with the rest of the British Isles, and during the early 6th century they immigrated from the island of Ireland to form the kingdom of Dál Riata, although exactly how much conquest took place is a matter of dispute with historians. It also appears likely that the Irish settled in parts of Wales, and even after the period of Irish settlement, Irish missionaries were active in Britain. York ''Conversion of Britain'' pp. 50–56 birth_date 585 birth_place Deira, England death_date 12 October 633 '''Edwin''' ( Retrieved on 23 February 2009. Norse (Norsemen) and Gaelic (Norse Gael) Viking raiders gained control of much of the area, creating the Danelaw. During this time there were close relations with Mann and the Isles (Kingdom of Mann and the Isles), Dublin (Kingdom of Dublin) and Norway. Northumbria was unified with the rest of England under Eadred (Eadred of England) around 952. What is known from history is that in 588 King Ælla of Deira died, and Æthelfrith of Bernicia (Æthelfrith of Northumbria) took the opportunity to invade and conquer Deira, driving Ælla 's 3-year old infant son, the future Edwin of Northumbria, into exile. Edwin would eventually ally himself with Rædwald of East Anglia in 616, defeating and killing Æthelfrith and becoming one of Northumbria's most successful kings. Edwin's life in exile is unknown, and there is no historical basis for placing him at the court of King Cadfan.


Elmet

, including Craven, Elmet, Rheged, and Gododdin. A native British kingdom, later called the Kingdom of Strathclyde, survived as an independent power into the 10th century in the area which became modern-day Dunbartonshire and Clydesdale. Yorke ''Conversion of Britain'' p. 38 To the north-west of Strathclyde lay the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata, and to the north-east a small number of Pictish kingdoms. Yorke ''Kings and Kingdoms'' pp. 83–86 Further north still lay the great Pictish kingdom of Fortriu, which after the Battle of Dun Nechtain in 685 came to be the strongest power in the northern half of Britain. Charles-Edwards "'Continuation of Bede" ''Seanchas'' pp. 137–145 Woolf "Dun Nechtain" ''Scottish Historical Review'' pp. 182–201 Woolf "Verturian hegemony" ''Mercia'' pp. 106–112 The Irish had always had contacts with the rest of the British Isles, and during the early 6th century they immigrated from the island of Ireland to form the kingdom of Dál Riata, although exactly how much conquest took place is a matter of dispute with historians. It also appears likely that the Irish settled in parts of Wales, and even after the period of Irish settlement, Irish missionaries were active in Britain. York ''Conversion of Britain'' pp. 50–56 According to the ''Historia Brittonum'', Penda besieged Oswiu at Iudeu; this site has been identified with Stirling, in the north of Oswiu's kingdom. Kirby, page 80. 4 (#References) Oswiu tried to buy peace: in the ''Historia Brittonum'', it is said that Oswiu offered treasure, which Penda distributed among his British allies. Bede states that the offer was simply rejected by Penda, who "resolved to extirpate all of Oswiu's nation, from the highest to the lowest". Additionally, according to Bede, Oswiu's son Ecgfrith (Ecgfrith of Northumbria) was being held hostage "at the court of Queen Cynwise, in the province of the Mercians" Bede, B. III, Ch. XXIV. 8 (#References) —perhaps surrendered by Oswiu as part of some negotiations or arrangement. It would seem that Penda's army then moved back south, perhaps returning home, Kirby, page 81. 4 (#References) but a great battle was fought near the river Winwaed in the region of Loidis, thought to be somewhere in the area around modern day Leeds, on a date given by Bede as 15 November. The identification of the Winwaed with a modern river is uncertain, but possibly it was a tributary of the Humber. There is good reason to believe it may well have been the river now known as Cock Beck in the ancient kingdom of Elmet. The Cock Beck meanders its way through Pendas Fields, close to an ancient well known as Pen Well on the outskirts of Leeds, before eventually joining the River Wharfe. This same Cock Beck whilst in flood also played a significant role in the much later Battle of Towton in 1461. Another possibility is the River Went (a tributary of the River Don, situated to the north of modern-day Doncaster). It may be that Penda's army was attacked by Oswiu at a point of strategic vulnerability, which would help explain Oswiu's victory over forces that were, according to Bede, much larger than his own. Breeze, "The Battle of the ''Uinued'' and the River Went, Yorkshire", pages 381–82. 13 (#References) thumb 200px right The main Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms in Edwin's time. (Image:Britain peoples circa 600.svg) With the death of Æthelfrith, and of the powerful Æthelberht of Kent the same year, Raedwald and his client Edwin were well placed to dominate England, and indeed Raedwald did so until his death a decade later. Edwin annexed the minor British (Brython) kingdom of Elmet following a campaign in either 616 or 626. Elmet had probably been subject to Mercia and then to Edwin. Death of Ceretic in ''Annales Cambriae'', s.a. 616; Bede, ''HE'', IV, xxiii; Higham, ''Kingdom of Northumbria'', pp. 84–87 & 116. The much larger kingdom of Lindsey appears to have been taken over c. 625, after the death of king Raedwald. Rivals The Deiran exile Hereric was poisoned while at the court of Ceretic (Ceretic of Elmet), king of Elmet; Æthelfrith may have been responsible for this killing. Bede, ''H.E.'', Book IV, chapter 23; see also Ziegler, "Politics of Exile", and Kirby, page 61, for the suggestion of Æthelfrith's guilt. Edwin ended up in East Anglia (Kingdom of the East Angles), under the protection of its king, Raedwald (Raedwald of East Anglia). Æthelfrith sent messengers to bribe Raedwald with "a great sum of money" into killing Edwin; Bede reports that his first message had no effect, but Æthelfrith sent more messengers and threatened war if Raedwald did not comply (bribes and threats of this kind may have previously been used to accomplish Hereric's killing. ) Raedwald eventually agreed to kill Edwin or hand him over to Æthelfrith's messengers, but was reportedly dissuaded from this by his wife, who said that such a thing was unworthy of his honour. A forcibly united Northumbria Ida’s grandson, Æthelfrith (Æthelfrith of Northumbria) (Æðelfriþ), united Deira (Deira (kingdom)) with his own kingdom by force around the year 604. He ruled the two kingdoms (united as Northumbria) until he was defeated and killed by Rædwald of East Anglia (Raedwald of East Anglia) (who had given refuge to Edwin (Edwin of Northumbria), son of Ælle, king of Deira (Aella of Deira)) around the year 616. Edwin then became king. The early part of Edwin's reign was possibly spent finishing off the remaining resistance coming from the Brythonic exiles of the old British kingdom, operating out of Gododdin. After he had defeated the remaining Brythonic population of the area, he was then drawn towards similar subjugation of Elmet (a Cumbric speaking territory which once existed in the modern-day West Riding of Yorkshire, near Leeds) which drew him into direct conflict with Wales proper. Early history The town dates from Saxon times and was part of an extensive manor granted by Athelstan to the see of York. The Archbishops of York had a residence and were lords of the manor. Their palace was located on the site occupied by the Manor House. Otley is close to Leeds and may have formed part of the kingdom of Elmet. Remains of the Archbishop's Palace were found during the construction of St Joseph's School. The town grew in the first half of the 13th century when the archbishops laid out burgage plots to attract merchants and tradespeople. The burgage plots were on Boroughgate, Walkergate and Kirkgate. Bondgate was for tenants who did not have 'burgage' privileges. A leper hospital was founded on the road to Harewood beyond Cross Green. In the north there developed the British kingdoms of the Hen Ogledd, the "Old North", comprising Ebrauc (probable name), Bryneich (Bernicia), Rheged, Strathclyde, Elmet and Gododdin. Fifth and sixth century repairs along Hadrian's Wall have been uncovered, and at Whithorn in southwestern Scotland (possibly the site of St Ninian's monastery). Chance discoveries have helped document the continuing urban occupation of some Roman towns such as Wroxeter and Caerwent. Roger White and Philip Barker, ''Wroxeter: Life and Death of a Roman City'', (Stroud: Tempus, 1998) Continued urban use might be associated with an ecclesiastical (Christianity) structure. Sub-Roman This is the period from the departure of the Romans in about 410 AD to the start of Danish supremacy in the area in 866 AD. At the end of Roman rule in the 5th century, Northern Britain may have come under the rule of Romano-British Coel Hen, the last of the Roman-style ''Duces Brittanniarum'' (Dukes of the Britons). However, the Romano-British kingdom rapidly broke up into smaller kingdoms and York became the capital of the British kingdom of Ebrauc. Most of what became Yorkshire fell under the rule of the kingdom of Ebrauc but Yorkshire also included territory from the kingdoms of Dunoting (Dunod Fawr) and Elmet, which formed at around this time as did Cravenshire (Craven District). thumb right 150px Depiction of Edwin of Northumbria (File:Saint King Edwin of Northumbria.jpg) from Sledmere In the late 5th century and early 6th century Angles from the Schleswig-Holstein peninsula began colonising the Wolds, North Sea and Humber coastal areas. This was followed by the subjugation of the whole of east Yorkshire and the British kingdom of Ebruac in about 560. The name the Angles gave to the territory was Dewyr, or Deira (Deira (kingdom)). Early rulers of Deira extended the territory north to the River Wear and about 600, Æthelfrith (Æthelfrith of Northumbria) was able to unite Deira with the northern kingdom of Bernicia, forming the kingdom of Northumbria, whose capital was at Eoforwic, modern day York. A later ruler, Edwin of Northumbria completed the conquest of the area by his conquest of the kingdom of Elmet, including Hallamshire and Loidis, in 617. He converted to the Christian religion, along with his nobles and many of his subjects, in 627 and was baptised at Eoforwic. His defeat at the Battle of Hatfield Chase by Penda of Mercia in 633 was followed by continuing struggles between Mercia and Northumbria for supremacy over Deira. Edwin's successor, Oswald, was sympathetic to the Celtic church and around 634 he invited Aidan (Aidan of Lindisfarne) from Iona to found a monastery at Lindesfarne as a base for converting Northumbria to Celtic Christianity. Aidan soon established a monastery on the cliffs above Whitby with Hilda (Hilda of Whitby) as abbess. Further monastic sites were established at Hackness and Lastingham and Celtic Christianity became more influential in Northumbria than the Roman system. This caused conflict within the church until the issue was resolved at the Synod of Whitby in 663 by Oswiu of Northumbria opting to adopt the Roman system. It is not entirely certain whether Hussa was the son of Ida (Ida of Bernicia), founder of the kingdom of Bernicia, or rather the leader of a rival Anglian faction. Little is known of Hussa's life and reign, however. At some point during his reign, the coalition forces of Rheged and the Brythonic (Britons (historical)) kingdoms of Strathclyde, Bernicia and Elmet laid siege to Hussa and was almost successful in driving the Anglian Bernician kings out of Britain (Sub-Roman Britain). It is thought this alliance ultimately failed due to arguments between the different British tribes culminating in the murder of Urien, the king of Rheghed, around 590 by his former ally, Morcant. * King Morcant who almost single-handedly destroyed any hope the Britons of The Old North (Y Gogledd Hen) had of resisting the Anglian (Angles) invaders during 6th century. He was part of a grand Brythonic (Britons (historical)) alliance, along with King Urien of Rheged, King Riderch Hael (Riderch I of Alt Clut) of Alt Clut (Kingdom of Strathclyde) and King Gwallawc Marchawc Trin of Elmet. They were initially extremely successful in driving back the Angles from Bryneich territory, forcing them to vacate ''Din Guardi'' – possibly the capital - around 590 and besieging them on ''Ynys Metcaut'' (now called Lindisfarne). However, Morcant grew envious of the successes of Urien, and perhaps became uneasy about the prospects of a greatly empowered Rheged after the Angles had been defeated. Treacherously, he had Urien assassinated by a man called Llofan Llaf Difo and the alliance of the Britons of the North collapsed. The Angles broke out from their containment and retook most of the lands they had held before the war to expel them had begun. thumb 300px Plan of the Roman Ridge (Image:RomanRidge.svg) The '''Roman Rig''' (also known as '''Roman Ridge''', '''Scotland Balk''', or '''Barber Balk''') is the name given to a series of earthworks to the north east of Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England that are believed to originally have formed a single Dyke (Dike (construction)) running from near Wincobank in Sheffield to Mexborough. Its purpose and date of construction are unknown. Formerly thought to have been a Roman road (Roman roads in Britain), modern archaeologists think that it was built either in the 1st century AD by the Brigantian tribes (Brigantes) as a defence against the Roman invasion of Britain, or after the 5th century to defend the kingdom of Elmet from the Angles. Ealdwulf was a first cousin of the saintly children of Anna of East Anglia. He was born into a Christian royal household, since his mother Hereswith may have been baptized in childhood by Paulinus of York in 626, together with Edwin, her sister and other members of the Northumbrian royal family. Hereswith's father was murdered as an exile in the British kingdom of Elmet: Edwin afterwards slew Ceretic of Elmet soon after becoming king in 616. The diplomatic marriage of Ealdwulf's parents occurred in the period between 626 and 633, when Edwin was slain by Cadwallon ap Cadfan. The marriage must have carried the expectation that Æthilric was to be a Christian husband and probably king of the East Angles. Like Edwin's conversion of Eorpwald (Eorpwald of East Anglia) in 627, it sealed Æthilric in kinship to Edwin. * Alt Clut or Ystrad Clud – a kingdom centred at what is now Dumbarton in Scotland. Later known as the Kingdom of Strathclyde, it was one of the best attested of the northern British kingdoms. It was also the last surviving, as it operated as an independent realm into the 11th century before it was finally absorbed by the Kingdom of Scotland. Koch 2006, p. 1819. * Elmet – centred in western Yorkshire in northern England. It was located south of the other northern British kingdoms, and also well east of present-day Wales, but managed to survive into the early 7th century. Koch 2006, pp. 670–671. * Gododdin – a kingdom in what is now southeastern Scotland and northeastern England, the area previously noted as the territory of the Votadini. They are the subjects of the poem ''Y Gododdin'', which memorialises a disastrous raid (Battle of Catraeth) by an army raised by the Gododdin on the Angles of Bernicia. Koch 2006, pp. 823–826. In contrast to most historians, Professor Nicholas Brooks has suggested that the list is of Northumbrian origin, noting that it would account for the inclusion of Elmet and the absence of the two Northumbrian kingdoms of Deira and Bernicia. He notes that a Mercian tribute list was would not have been headed by Mercia, as "an early mediaeval king did not impose tribute upon his own kingdom": it must have been a list produced by another kingdom, perhaps with an altogether different purpose. Brooks, ''Anglo-Saxon Myths'', p. 62. Featherstone, ''Tribal Hidage'', p. 30. - Ceredig ap Gwallog c.614–617 Elmet ''King of the Britons'' (in 614) Bede may refer only to Britons in Elmet - The reason for Gildas' disaffection for these individuals is unknown. He was selective in his choice of kings, as he had no comments concerning the kings of the other British kingdoms that were thriving at the time, such as Rheged, Gododdin, Elmet, Pengwern Powys (Pengwern), or the kingdoms of modern-day southern England. That he chose only the kings associated with one king's pre-eminence (Maglocune, the "dragon") suggests a reason other than his claim of moral outrage over personal depravity. Neither outrage nor a doctrinal dispute would seem to justify beginning the condemnation of the five kings with a personal attack against Constantine's mother (the "unclean lioness"). Etymology The name Swillington is derived from Old English (Old English language) ''swin'' "pig" + ''lēah'' "wood" + ''tun'' "farm". The name was recorded as ''Svilentone'' in 1147. Historically Swillington's full title was Swillington-in-Elmet, which refers to the village being part of the former Celtic kingdom of Elmet. However as with many other places the "-in-Elmet" has been lost in modern times with only a few exceptions such as Barwick-in-Elmet and Sherburn-in-Elmet surviving. Nowadays Elmet only exists as a political constituency (United Kingdom constituencies). Many local people, mainly of the younger generations have taken to abbreviating Swillington to "Swilly".


Craven

as the Kingdom of Northumbria. Yorke ''Kings and Kingdoms'' p. 74 A number of Celtic kingdoms also existed in this region, including Craven, Elmet, Rheged, and Gododdin. A native British kingdom, later called the Kingdom of Strathclyde, survived as an independent power into the 10th century in the area which became modern-day Dunbartonshire and Clydesdale. Yorke ''Conversion of Britain'' p. 38 To the north-west of Strathclyde lay the Gaelic kingdom of Dál Riata, and to the north-east a small number of Pictish kingdoms. Yorke ''Kings and Kingdoms'' pp. 83–86 Further north still lay the great Pictish kingdom of Fortriu, which after the Battle of Dun Nechtain in 685 came to be the strongest power in the northern half of Britain. Charles-Edwards "'Continuation of Bede" ''Seanchas'' pp. 137–145 Woolf "Dun Nechtain" ''Scottish Historical Review'' pp. 182–201 Woolf "Verturian hegemony" ''Mercia'' pp. 106–112 The Irish had always had contacts with the rest of the British Isles, and during the early 6th century they immigrated from the island of Ireland to form the kingdom of Dál Riata, although exactly how much conquest took place is a matter of dispute with historians. It also appears likely that the Irish settled in parts of Wales, and even after the period of Irish settlement, Irish missionaries were active in Britain. York ''Conversion of Britain'' pp. 50–56 By February King Stephen marched north to deal with David. The two armies avoided each other, and Stephen was soon on the road south. In the summer David split his army into two forces, sending William fitz Duncan to march into Lancashire, where he harried Furness and Craven. On 10 June, William fitz Duncan met a force of knights and men-at-arms. A pitched battle took place, the battle of Clitheroe, and the English army was routed. Oram, ''David'', pp. 132–3. '''Embsay''' is a village in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England and is situated about 2 miles north-east of Skipton. The village is grouped with the neighbouring village of Eastby in the civil parish of Embsay with Eastby, which has a population of 1,758. Office for National Statistics : ''Census 2001 : Parish Headcounts : Craven'' Retrieved 2009-09-18 thumb The parish church of St Thomas, Sutton-on-Craven, built 1868-69 (File:Church of St Thomas, Sutton in Craven.jpg) '''Sutton-in-Craven''' is a village and civil parish (civil parishes in England) in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England that is situated in the Aire Valley (River Aire) between Skipton and Keighley. In 2001 the population was 3,480. Sutton-in-Craven Parish Council retrieved 2011-06-25 The village is adjacent to Glusburn and Cross Hills, but although these three effectively form a small town, Sutton village maintains its distinct identity. '''Litton''' is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England that lies further up Littondale than Arncliffe (Arncliffe, North Yorkshire). A little further up the dale is the small hamlet of Halton Gill. From Litton there are walks over the fells to the east to Buckden (Buckden, North Yorkshire) in Wharfedale and up Pen-y-ghent via Plover Hill to the west. From Halton Gill there is a bridle path over the Horse Head Pass to the east to Yockenthwaite in Langstrothdale. This path was used by the priest from Hubberholme to reach the small chapel in Halton Gill.


Classical Athens

, ''Ichneutai'', "trackers"), also known as the ''Searchers'', ''Trackers'' or ''Tracking Satyrs'', is a fragmentary satyr play by the fifth-century Athenian (Classical Athens) dramatist (Theatre of ancient Greece) Sophocles. Three nondescript quotations in ancient authors were all that was known of the play until 1912, Hunt (1912) 31. when the extensive remains of a second-century CE papyrus roll of the ''Ichneutae'' were published among the ''Oxyrhynchus Papyri''. With more than four hundred lines surviving in their entirety or in part, the ''Ichneutae'' is now the best preserved ancient satyr play after Euripides' ''Cyclops (Cyclops (play))'', the only fully extant example of the genre. thumb right As for me, all I know is that I know nothing. (File:Socrates Louvre.jpg) '''Socrates (w:Socrates)''' (Σωκράτης; c. 470 BC – 399 BC) was a classical Greek (w:Classical Greece) (Athenian (w:Classical Athens)) philosopher credited as one of the founders of Western philosophy (w:Western philosophy). Through his portrayal in Plato's dialogues, Socrates has become renowned for his contribution to the field of ethics (w:ethics), and it is this Platonic Socrates who lends his name to the concepts of Socratic irony and the Socratic method (w:Socratic method), or ''elenchus''. The latter remains a commonly used tool in a wide range of discussions, and is a type of pedagogy (w:pedagogy) in which a series of questions is asked not only to draw individual answers, but also to encourage fundamental insight into the issue at hand. * '''He''' Socrates, in an earlier dialogue, the ''Crito (w:Crito)'' contended that he had been condemned by due process of law, and that it would be wrong to do anything illegal to avoid punishment. He '''first proclaimed the principle which we associate with the Sermon on the Mount (w:Sermon_on_the_Mount),''' that "we ought not retaliate evil for evil to any one, whatever evil may be suffered from him." He then imagines himself engaged in a dialogue with the laws of Athens (w:Classical Athens), in which they point out that he owes them the kind of respect that a son owes to a father or a slave to his master, but in an even higher degree; and that, moreover, every Athenian citizen is free to emigrate if he dislikes the Athenian State (w:Athenian_democracy). ** Book One, Part II, Chapter XVI, Plato's Theory of Immortality, p. 133. * '''There is every reason to believe that the later Pythagoreans exercised a strong influence on the study and development of mathematics at Athens (w:Classical Athens). The Sophists (w:Sophist) acquired geometry from Pythagorean sources. Plato bought the works of Philolaus and had a warm friend in Archytas.''' ** p. 23. The Sophist School (w:Sophism) * '''Athens (w:Classical Athens)... became the richest and most beautiful city of antiquity.''' All menial work was performed by slaves. ...The citizen of Athens was well to do and enjoyed a large amount of leisure. The government being purely democratic, every citizen was a politician. To make his influence felt among his fellow-men he must, first of all, be educated. Thus '''there arose a demand for teachers. The supply came principally from Sicily (w:Sicily#Greek_and_Roman_period), where Pythagorean doctrines had spread. These teachers were called ''Sophists'' (w:Sophist), or "wise men." Unlike the Pythagoreans, they accepted pay for their teaching. Although rhetoric was the principal feature of their instruction, they also taught geometry, astronomy, and philosophy.''' ** p. 24.


Prince George, British Columbia

forestry, oil & gas, mining, independent power producers, the biomass industry and transportation. * Downtown Summerfest was revived by the Downtown Business Improvement Association in 2012 and is held every August. The street party takes place in downtown Prince George and features entertainment, vendors, activities for children and a Taste Pavilion featuring food from local restaurants. * The Prince George Coldsnap Festival (formerly known as the Prince George Folk Festival) is a national folk music festival held annually in the winter at various venues throughout Prince George. Past artists have included John Denver, Bruce Cockburn, Sarah Harmer, Janis Ian, Alpha Ya Ya Diallo. 2006 saw Matthew Good, Fred Eaglesmith, The Paperboys, and many others. The Prince George Folkfest – July 27 & 28, 2007 – Welcome Local musicians include: The Goat Island Extrapolation, MySpace.com – the goat island extrapolation – Prince George, CA – Indie Christian Expérimentale – www.myspace.com thegoatislandextrapolation and Shae Morin. Shae Morin * The Snow Daze Winter Festival is held each February. Some of the featured events include the Mr. PG pageant, curling, bed races, OTL (over the line) baseball, Texas hold'em poker tournament and snow golf. Prince George's Mardi Gras of Winter Society – Snow Daze Winter Festival, British Columbia, Canada * Prince George celebrates BC River's Day on the last Sunday in September at Fort George Park with a live free music festival. Performers in 2006 included Marcel Gagnon (Marcel Gagnon (musician)) and Fear Zero among many others. BC Rivers Day Music Festival – Prince George, British Columbia, Canada * The Father's Day Show and Shine is held in Fort George Park and features vendors, live performers and both vintage and modern cars. 2007's event saw an estimated 25,000 visitors and 365 cars were on display. - There are more labour events being planned. Across northern B.C. thousands of w:Canadian Union of Public Employees Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) members are off the job in solidarity with the teachers. In Prince George (w:Prince George, British Columbia) a rally is planned to be held in front of the office of Education Minister Shirley Bond (w:Shirley Bond).


Santo Domingo

S850 million purpose-built business facility on a 17 square kilometer greenfield site, bordering the Caribbean coast. The site is midway between Santo Domingo and the Casa de Campo (Casa de Campo, Dominican Republic) resort and will include office space, a conference centre, independent power generators and a private landing strip. The IFCA will house private and commercial banks and an electronic exchange, called LAIFEX, to clear and settle emerging market debt and other tradable products. In 1719, Frézier returned to the New World as Engineer-in-Chief to Hispaniola (Santo Domingo) on a two-year assignment to fortify the island. He made a map of the island, and also a plan of the City of Santo Domingo (Santo Domingo). He suffered from malaria there, but was only allowed to return to Europe in 1728. Recent news In 2002 the marketing magazine ''Mercado'' says that results of a survey conducted by ''Read & Asociados'' rank Empresa Leon Jimenez as “the most admired company” in the Dominican Republic, followed by Banco Popular and Codetel. In 2003 Empresa León Jimenes inaugurated a 10-story, $10 million corporate office building in Santo Domingo, publishing two books, and opening a cultural center in Santiago. The shrinkage of the cigar segment among the company's holdings continued, as León Jimenes expanded its banking business by acquiring the fourth-largest bank in the Dominican Republic in the same year. Expanding its reach so that it does not depend solely on regulated interests is part of a conscious strategy at León Jimenes. At a ceremony attended by then President Hipólito Mejía on 2 December 2003, the Leon Jimenes family announced the creation of the Banco León, which will represent a union between the Banco Profesional and Banco Nacional de Credito (Bancredito). DR1 Daily News, December 3, 2003 Pan American Games (2003 Pan American Games) Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic bgcolor "gold" 1st John Krevey, who ran ''Pier 66 Maritime'', died 4 February 2011, at age 62, while on a vacation with his son in Santo Domingo. Krevey was one of the earliest members of Friends of Hudson River Park, the civic group advocating for the 5-mile-long waterfront park. He was a member of the Friends’ board of directors until 2010. John Krevey, 62; Activist enlivened the waterfront. ''The Villager'', Volume 80, Number 37, February 10-16, 2011. Retrieved 15 March 2011. '''Instituto Tecnológico de Santo Domingo''' —or '''Santo Domingo Institute of Technology''' (also known as '''INTEC'''), is a private (Private university), coeducational, university in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. It was founded on June 15, 1972, by a group of young professionals and is considered the best institute of technology in the country. Dmoz:Regional Caribbean Dominican Republic Localities Santo Domingo Wikipedia:Santo Domingo Commons:Category:Santo Domingo


Medes

to the time of the conquest of Media (Medes) by Cyrus the Great, emperors ruled the conquered lands, through client kings (Client state) and governors. The chief difference was that in Persian culture the concept of kingship was indivisible from divinity: divine authority validated the divine right of kings. The twenty satraps established by Cyrus were never kings, but viceroys ruling in the king's name, although in political reality many grabbed any chance to carve themselves an independent

power base. Darius the Great (Darius I) gave the satrapies a definitive organization, increased their number to twenty-three and fixed their annual tribute (Behistun inscription). Demetrius I is famous in Jewish history for his victory over the Maccabees, killing Judas Maccabaeus in Nisan (Nisan-years), 160 BC. 1 Macc 9:3 (312 - A.S. 152 160 B.C. ) Demetrius acquired his surname of ''Soter'', or Savior, from the Babylonians, whom he delivered


Staten Island

wikipedia:Staten Island


Normandy

Commons:Normandie


Mongolia

2010-05-02 As horse nomadism was introduced into Mongolia, the political center of the Eurasian Steppe also shifted to Mongolia, where it remained until the 18th century CE. The intrusions of northern pastoralists (e.g., Guifang, Shanrong, Donghu (Donghu people)) into China during the Shang dynasty (1600–1046 BC) and Zhou dynasty (1046–256 BC) presaged the age of nomadic empires. The concept of Mongolia as an independent power north of China is seen in the letter sent by Emperor Wen of Han to Laoshang Chanyu in 162 BC (recorded in the Hanshu): Commons:Category:Mongolia WikiPedia:Mongolia Dmoz:Regional Asia Mongolia


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