Places Known For

food medical


Balaklava

by the British and allied forces. It was hoped that the siege would be short but with the coming of winter the conditions were appalling and it was proving difficult to transport clothing, food, medical supplies and weaponry from Balaclava to the front.


Jacmel

wikipedia:Jacmel Commons:Category:Jacmel


Manchester, New Hampshire

with food, medical supplies and military stores. On August 3, they marched west and, in the famed Battle of Bennington on August 16, they defeated the combined British (Loyalist (American Revolution))-German (Hessian (soldiers)) forces, thereby achieving a major turning point of the war.'' #From the southern boundary of Merrimack (Merrimack, New Hampshire) to the northern boundary of Bedford (Bedford, New Hampshire) #From Webster St. in northern Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire) to the northern boundary of Hooksett (Hooksett, New Hampshire) #From U.S. Route 4 in the center of Boscawen (Boscawen, New Hampshire) to NH-127 (New Hampshire Route 127) in Franklin (Franklin, New Hampshire) North of Manchester into Hooksett Beginning at Webster Street near Livingston Park in north Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire), heading past Interstate 93, this D.W. Highway is the main commercial thoroughfare in Hooksett (Hooksett, New Hampshire), continuing northbound east of the Merrimack River to the town boundary with Allenstown (Allenstown, New Hampshire), where US 3 becomes Allenstown Road. History In 1926, Dr. John F. Holmes of Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire) wrote the song's lyrics. Maurice Hoffman, Jr., the Franklin Street Congregational Church organist of Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire), wrote the music. The 1941 General Court (New Hampshire General Court) voted against making it the state song, and the 1943 General Court killed a bill public contest with cash prizes, to pick a state song. In 1949, the General Court voted in favor of designating "Old New Hampshire" as the state song. History In 1926, Dr. John F. Holmes of Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire) wrote the song's lyrics. Maurice Hoffman, Jr., the Franklin Street Congregational Church organist of Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire), wrote the music. The 1941 General Court (New Hampshire General Court) voted against making it the state song, and the 1943 General Court killed a bill public contest with cash prizes, to pick a state song. In 1949, the General Court voted in favor of designating "Old New Hampshire" as the state song. During the 1970s, the Cohens gradually began ceding control of the firm's day-to-day operations, and Lechmere's product line began to change, focusing increasingly on traditional discount store fare, which was inexpensive and frequently of lower quality. As a result, the company's reputation for offering unique merchandise began to suffer, and sales began to decline. In an effort to counteract this trend, Lechmere embarked upon a program in the late 1970s to boost sales by cutting prices dramatically. With this strategy, sales at the chain's stores began to increase. In 1977, Lechmere opened a fifth store, in Manchester, New Hampshire, and the following year a sixth store was opened in Framingham, Massachusetts. http: www.answers.com topic lechmere-1 Currently the Wildcats are carried by a network of radio stations (Known as The UNH Sports Network) across New Hampshire, anchored by WGIR (WGIR (AM)) in Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire) and WPKX (WPKX (AM)) and WQSO in Rochester (Rochester, New Hampshire). Games are also carried by student radio station WUNH. In West-Central New Hampshire, the station's primary coverage area consists of Sullivan (Sullivan County, New Hampshire) and Grafton (Grafton County, New Hampshire) Counties which is technically part of the Burlington (Burlington, Vermont) Plattsburgh market (media market). Additional viewership comes from surrounding counties in the Southern New Hampshire sub-market which is actually part of the Greater Boston designated market area. As a result, WNNE is within reach of the home territories of sister stations WMUR-TV in Manchester, New Hampshire and Hearst Television New England flagship WCVB-TV in Boston, Massachusetts. The speed limit on Interstate 93 through Franconia Notch State Park falls to 45 mph where the highway narrows to one lane in each direction, but rises back to 65 mph (in 10 mph increments going south) once the highway leaves Franconia Notch. Interstate 393 in Concord (Concord, New Hampshire) has a 55 mph posted speed limit for its entire length, with the exception of 45 mph and 35 mph zones on the westbound portion closest to the city center and the end of the highway. The Interstate 293 speed limit through downtown Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire) falls to 50 mph as it runs along the Merrimack River, but increases to 55 mph on either side of the city center. '''Holy Family Academy''' is a co-educational (Coeducation) private high school located in Manchester, New Hampshire, teaching in the Roman Catholic (Catholicism) classical (Classical education movement) tradition. In September, 2006, the school was named to the Catholic High School Honor Roll, which lists the top 50 Catholic high schools in the United States. It is independently operated within the Roman Catholic Diocese of Manchester. thumb left 1922 map of New Hampshire published in the bulletin of the Brown Company (Image:State of New Hampshire.JPG) in Berlin (Berlin, New Hampshire) The textile industry was hit hard by the depression and growing competition from southern mills. The closing of the Amoskeag Mills (Amoskeag Manufacturing Company) in 1935 was a major blow to Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire), as was the closing of the former Nashua Manufacturing Company mill in Nashua (Nashua, New Hampshire) in 1949 and the bankruptcy of the Brown Company paper mill in Berlin (Berlin, New Hampshire) in the 1940s, which led to new ownership. *Children's Hospital at Dartmouth (CHaD), Lebanon (Lebanon, New Hampshire), Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire), Nashua (Nashua, New Hampshire), Dover (Dover, New Hampshire) DATE OF DEATH November 15, 1853 PLACE OF DEATH Manchester, New Hampshire, USA (United States) - Southern New Hampshire University Penmen Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire) Northeast-10 Conference Born in 1923 in Manchester, New Hampshire, Economou built his first telescope at the age of 12. After studying astronomy and astrophysics at Harvard University, his career began at the Polaroid Corporation. In 1944, he joined the United States Army and was assigned to Los Alamos, New Mexico, where he helped conceptualize camera lenses (Lens (optics)) used to photograph bomb tests. :: Okay, I phrased that badly. I should have said that ''the article'' provides no evidence that this term is in common, widespread use. Encyclopedia articles need to be verifiable (WP:V) and their subject has to be, in my opinion, important enough to merit an encyclopedia article. If you want to rewrite the thing, I will reconsider my position but a handful of hits to websites doesn't equal notability AFAIC. Reyk (User:Reyk) 06:26, 11 January 2006 (UTC) ::: Also, since the Manchester, New Hampshire contains the term, I don't think it needs a seperate article. Reyk (User:Reyk) 06:30, 11 January 2006 (UTC) :::: Change my vote to '''keep''' per Karmafist and Nhprman's rewrites.Reyk (User:Reyk) 21:06, 13 January 2006 (UTC) Bonner graduated from Northeastern University with a bachelor’s degree in English (1994). She began her broadcasting career at WCHS-TV as a news producer and fill-in sports anchor reporter in Charleston, West Virginia, and also worked in Manchester, New Hampshire, and Bangor, Maine. Locations Corporate headquarters are in Milpitas, California. Retrieved 12-01-2011 The '''Yankee Network''' was an American radio network. It was founded in 1930 by John Shepard III; in 1949, a controlling interest in the network was purchased by General Tire when Robert Shepard chairman of the network's parent company, The Shepard Company, decided that radio and its dependence on the FCC was too risky a business to bankroll any longer. Money was also needed to pay estate taxes following the death of John III's and Robert's father John Shepard Jr. the previous year. The flagship Yankee station was Boston's 1230, later 1260 and finally 680 WNAC (WRKO). The Yankee Network had affiliates elsewhere in Massachusetts (Fall River (Fall River, Massachusetts), Lowell (Lowell, Massachusetts)–Lawrence (Lawrence, Massachusetts), New Bedford (New Bedford, Massachusetts), Springfield (Springfield, Massachusetts)); Connecticut (Bridgeport (Bridgeport, Connecticut), Hartford (Hartford, Connecticut), Waterbury (Waterbury, Connecticut)); Rhode Island (Providence (Providence, Rhode Island)); New Hampshire (Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire)), and Maine (Augusta (Augusta, Maine), Bangor (Bangor, Maine), Lewiston (Lewiston, Maine), Portland (Portland, Maine)). - 4 align "left" Boston-Providence-Worcester align "left" Boston, MA; Providence (Providence, Rhode Island), RI-MA; Worcester (Worcester, Massachusetts), MA-CT; Barnstable Town (Barnstable Town, Massachusetts), MA; Leominster (Leominster, Massachusetts)-Fitchburg (Fitchburg, Massachusetts), MA; New Bedford (New Bedford, Massachusetts), MA; Dover (Dover, New Hampshire)-Rochester (Rochester, New Hampshire), NH; Manchester (Manchester, New Hampshire), NH; Nashua (Nashua, New Hampshire), NH; Portsmouth (Portsmouth, New Hampshire), NH 6,692,295 -


Dakar

champion accessdate 25 October 2006 year 2002 publisher UNESCO Additionally, he paid for the construction of a school for poor children and for area improvements in Dakar, Senegal. He supports a hospital for child victims of war in Sarajevo, which specialises in caring for amputees. In Lima, Peru he funded the "Palace for the Poor", a centre for helping homeless street children obtain an education, clothing, food, medical attention, and shelter. He stated his interest in these various efforts was piqued both by his love for children and the fact that these causes had received little attention. While an exact figure for the amount of money he has donated throughout his life is unknown, it is known that in his last four years as a driver, he donated at least $50 million. In 2008 it was revealed that he had donated between $5M and $10M to the William J. Clinton Presidential Center and Park of Bill Clinton. Commons:Category:Dakar Wikipedia:Dakar


Nairobi

an attempt to build a Federation of East Africa which would include Uganda, Tanganyika and Kenya. Feed The Children's international programs focus on providing food, medical assistance, emergency relief and sustainable development. Recent international efforts include the Abandoned Baby Center (ABC) in Nairobi, Kenya, which provides medical treatment and safe haven for children who have been orphaned or abandoned by poverty and the AIDS epidemic. Other international projects


Lima

Dmoz:Regional South America Peru Departments Lima Lima Commons:Category:Lima Wikipedia:Lima


Sarajevo

for helping homeless street children obtain an education, clothing, food, medical attention, and shelter. He stated his interest in these various efforts was piqued both by his love for children and the fact that these causes had received little attention. While an exact figure for the amount of money he has donated throughout his life is unknown, it is known that in his last four years as a driver, he donated at least $50 million. In 2008


Nicaragua

, $


Honduras

Commons:Category:Honduras wikipedia:Honduras


Haiti

in Guatemala, USSOUTHCOM deployed 11 military helicopters and 125 personnel to assist with relief efforts. In conjunction with their Guatemalan counterparts, they evacuated 48 victims and delivered nearly 200 tons of food, medical supplies and communications equipment. Following Tropical Storm Gamma in Honduras, JTF-Bravo deployed nine helicopters and more than 40 personnel to assist with relief efforts. They airlifted more than 100,000 pounds of emergency food, water and medical supplies. USSOUTHCOM was deployed to Haiti following the 2010 Haiti earthquake to lead the humanitarian effort. http: www.southcom.mil appssc news.php?storyId 2033 Balmaseda was awarded her first Pulitzer Prize for Commentary in 1993 for her writings on the plight of Cuban and Haitian refugees. Her second was awarded for breaking-news reporting in 2001, for her role in covering the story of Elián González. That same year, she won the Hispanic Heritage Award for Literature (Hispanic Heritage Foundation). WikiPedia:Haiti Dmoz:Regional Caribbean Haiti Commons:Category:Haiti


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