Places Known For

early religious


Vitebsk

-Yakhel 5755 , commentary on Exodus (Book of Exodus) 35:1 - 38:20. February 25, 1995. Accessed 12 February 2006. Velvel Pasternak, Music and Art, part of "12 Paths" on Judaism.com. Accessed 12 February 2006. It should be noted however, that despite fears by early religious communities of art being used for idolatrous purposes, Jewish ''sacred'' art is recorded in the Tanakh and extends throughout Jewish Antiquity (ancient history) and the Middle Ages. The Tabernacle and the two Temples in Jerusalem (Temple in Jerusalem) form the first known examples of "Jewish art". During the first centuries of the Common Era, Jewish religious art also was created in regions surrounding the Mediterranean (Mediterranean Sea) such as Syria and Greece, including frescoes on the walls of synagogues, of which the Dura Europas Synagogue is the only survivor Jessica Spitalnic Brockman, A Brief History of Jewish Art on MyJewishLearning.com. Accessed 12 February 2006. as well as the Jewish catacombs (Catacombs of Rome) in Rome. Michael Schirber, Did Christians copy Jewish catacombs?, MSNBC, July 20, 2005. Accessed 12 February 2006. Jona Lendering, The Jewish diaspora: Rome. Livius.org. Accessed 12 February 2006. A Jewish tradition of illuminated manuscripts in at least Late Antiquity has left no survivors, but can be deduced from borrowings in Early Medieval Christian art. Middle Age (Jews in the Middle Ages) Rabbinical (Rabbinical literature) and Kabbalistic (Kabbalah) literature also contain textual and graphic art, most famously illuminated haggadahs such as the Sarajevo Haggadah, and other manuscripts like the Nuremberg Mahzor. Some of these were illustrated by Jewish artists and some by Christians; equally some Jewish artists and craftsmen in various media worked on Christian commissions. Roza Bieliauskiene and Felix Tarm, Brief History of Jewish Art, Jewish Art Network. Accessed January 14, 2010. Johnson again summarizes this sudden change from a limited participation by Jews in visual art (as in many other arts) to a large movement by them into this branch of European cultural life: Again, the arrival of the Jewish artist was a strange phenomenon. It is true that, over the centuries, there had been many animals (though few humans) in Jewish art: lions on Torah curtains, owls on Judaic coins, animals on the Capernaum capitals, birds on the rim of the fountain-basis in the 5th century Naro synagogue in Tunis; there were carved animals, too, on timber synagogues in eastern Europe - indeed the Jewish wood-carver (woodcarving) was the prototype of the modern Jewish plastic artist (Plastic arts). A book of Yiddish folk-ornament (Ornament (architecture)), printed at Vitebsk in 1920, was similar to Chagall's own bestiary. But the resistance of pious Jews to portraying the living image was still strong at the beginning of the twentieth century. Johnson, ''op.cit.'', p. 411. thumb ''The Fiddler'' by Marc Chagall (File:Image-Chagall Fiddler.jpg) Alpher was the son of a Russian Jewish immigrant, Samuel Alpher, from Vitebsk, Russia. His mother, Rose, died of stomach cancer in 1938 and his father later remarried. Ralph graduated at age 15 from Theodore Roosevelt High School (Theodore Roosevelt High School (Washington, D.C.)) in Washington, D.C., and was Major and Commander of his school's Cadet program (Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps). He worked in the high school theater as stage manager for two years, supplementing his family's Depression-era income. He also learned Gregg shorthand, and in 1937 began working for the Director of the American Geophysical Union as a stenographer. In 1940 he finally ended up at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism of the Carnegie Foundation, where he was working with Dr. Scott Forbush (Scott Forbush). They both were working for the U.S. Navy on contract to develop ship degaussing techniques, evaluation, and related research for the first 3 years of WWII. He contributed to the development of the Mark 32 and Mark 45 detonators, torpedoes, Naval gun control, and other top-secret ordnance work and he was recognized at the end of the War with the Naval Ordnance Development Award (December 10, 1945—with Symbol). Perhaps because of the highly classified nature of his work for the U.S. Navy (United States Navy) and the Office of Scientific Research and Development, Alpher's war time work has been somewhat obscured. From 1944 through 1955 he was employed at the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University. During the daytime he was involved in the development of ballistic missiles, guidance systems, and related subjects, in 1948 he earned his Ph.D. in Physics with a theory of Nucleosynthesis called neutron-capture, and from 1948 onward collaborated with Dr. Robert C. Herman, also at APL, on predictions of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation. Alpher was somewhat ambivalent about the nature of this work. source: Dr. Victor S. Alpher # Grodno State Medical University, Grodno (Belarus) # Medical University, Vitebsk (Belarus) # National University of Pharmacy, Charkow (Ukraine) thumb 300px German troops in a town near Mogilev (File:Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-137-1032-14A, Russland, brennendes Dorf, deutsche Kavallerie.jpg) at the DnieperOn 10 July the Germans started their own offensive when Guderian's 2nd Panzer Group launched its surprise attack over the Dnieper. His forces literally overran the weak 13th Army, which opposed his forces. By 13 July Guderian had passed Mogilev, trapped several Soviet divisions there and his spearhead unit, the 29th Mot. Division (29th Infantry Division (Germany)), was already


Vatican City

in 1709. In the case of Our Lady of Kazan, legend holds that the Blessed Virgin revealed the location of the precious icon to a 10 year old girl in 1579. Later in his life, Gounod returned to his early religious impulses, writing much sacred music. His ''Pontifical Anthem'' (''Marche Pontificale'', 1869) eventually (1949) became the official national anthem of Vatican City. He expressed a desire to compose his ''Messe à la mémoire de Jeanne d'Arc'' (1887) while kneeling


Vilnius

. Both parents encouraged religiosity and Christian piety in the young Josaphat. In the school at Volodymyr Josaphat — ''Ioann'' (John) was his baptismal name — gave evidence of unusual talent; he applied himself to the study of the Church Slavonic language, and learned almost the entire horologion by heart, which from this period he began to read daily. From this source he drew his early religious education, because the clergy seldom preached or gave catechism catechetical


Madrid

with the Jorge Juan mentioned above, he also wrote ''Noticias secretas de América'', giving valuable information regarding the early religious orders in Spanish America. This work was published by David Barry in London, 1826. In 1616 he returned to Leuven, to take charge of the college of St Pulcheria, a hostel for Dutch (Netherlands) students of theology. Pupils found him a somewhat choleric and exacting master and a great recluse from academic society. However, he took an active part in the university's resistance to the Jesuits, for they had established a theological school of their own in Leuven, which was proving itself a formidable rival to the official university faculty of divinity. In the hope of suppressing their encroachments, Jansen was sent twice to Madrid, in 1624 and 1626; the second time he narrowly escaped the Inquisition. He warmly supported the Catholic missionary archbishop (apostolic vicar) of the (Northern) Netherlands, Rovenius, in his contests with the Jesuits, who were trying to evangelize that country without regard to the archbishop's wishes. He also crossed more than once the Dutch Calvinist–Presbyterian champion, Gisbertus Voetius, still remembered for his attacks on René Descartes. The '''Royal Seat of San Lorenzo de El Escorial''' is a historical residence of the king of Spain (monarchy of Spain), in the town of San Lorenzo de El Escorial, about


Syria

, commentary on Exodus (Book of Exodus) 35:1 - 38:20. February 25, 1995. Accessed 12 February 2006. Velvel Pasternak, Music and Art, part of "12 Paths" on Judaism.com. Accessed 12 February 2006. It should be noted however, that despite fears by early religious communities of art being used for idolatrous purposes, Jewish ''sacred'' art is recorded in the Tanakh and extends throughout Jewish Antiquity (ancient history) and the Middle Ages. The Tabernacle and the two Temples in Jerusalem (Temple in Jerusalem) form the first known examples of "Jewish art". During the first centuries of the Common Era, Jewish religious art also was created in regions surrounding the Mediterranean (Mediterranean Sea) such as Syria and Greece, including frescoes on the walls of synagogues, of which the Dura Europas Synagogue is the only survivor Jessica Spitalnic Brockman, A Brief History of Jewish Art on MyJewishLearning.com. Accessed 12 February 2006. as well as the Jewish catacombs (Catacombs of Rome) in Rome. Michael Schirber, Did Christians copy Jewish catacombs?, MSNBC, July 20, 2005. Accessed 12 February 2006. Jona Lendering, The Jewish diaspora: Rome. Livius.org. Accessed 12 February 2006. A Jewish tradition of illuminated manuscripts in at least Late Antiquity has left no survivors, but can be deduced from borrowings in Early Medieval Christian art. Middle Age (Jews in the Middle Ages) Rabbinical (Rabbinical literature) and Kabbalistic (Kabbalah) literature also contain textual and graphic art, most famously illuminated haggadahs such as the Sarajevo Haggadah, and other manuscripts like the Nuremberg Mahzor. Some of these were illustrated by Jewish artists and some by Christians; equally some Jewish artists and craftsmen in various media worked on Christian commissions. Roza Bieliauskiene and Felix Tarm, Brief History of Jewish Art, Jewish Art Network. Accessed January 14, 2010. Johnson again summarizes this sudden change from a limited participation by Jews in visual art (as in many other arts) to a large movement by them into this branch of European cultural life: Again, the arrival of the Jewish artist was a strange phenomenon. It is true that, over the centuries, there had been many animals (though few humans) in Jewish art: lions on Torah curtains, owls on Judaic coins, animals on the Capernaum capitals, birds on the rim of the fountain-basis in the 5th century Naro synagogue in Tunis; there were carved animals, too, on timber synagogues in eastern Europe - indeed the Jewish wood-carver (woodcarving) was the prototype of the modern Jewish plastic artist (Plastic arts). A book of Yiddish folk-ornament (Ornament (architecture)), printed at Vitebsk in 1920, was similar to Chagall's own bestiary. But the resistance of pious Jews to portraying the living image was still strong at the beginning of the twentieth century. Johnson, ''op.cit.'', p. 411. - Shem Mesopotamia, Syria, Palestine, and Arabia. In the Bible, Shem is Noah's eldest son, the ancestor of the Hebrews, Arabs and Assyrians; hence, the modern "Semite" and Semitic languages (via Greek ''Sem''), used properly to designate the family of languages spoken by these peoples. - Background Muhammad Ali of Egypt, ostensibly only a vassal state of the Ottoman Empire, was seeking to increase his personal power and gain control over Palestine, Syria, and Arabia. In late 1831, he took his newly-reformed army into Syria, resulting in the Egyptian–Ottoman War (1831–1833) against the Ottoman Sultan, Mahmud II. Ali easily defeated Ottoman forces and threatened Constantinople itself. While Britain (Kingdom of Great Britain) and France were sympathetic to Muhammad Ali, Nicholas I (Nicholas I of Russia) sent a Russian army to the assistance of the Ottoman Empire. This intervention led to the Convention of Kutahya in May 1833, which left Muhammad Ali in control of Syria and Arabia. Sponsor countries and organizations The LNM-JF received financial aid and arms from many countries such as Syria, Libya, Iraq and Southern Yemen, in addition to Palestinian support; besides lending their political backing and contributing with their organizational skills, experienced Palestinian cadres from RF and PLO groups provided weapons, equipment, and in many cases, military leadership to the Lebanese leftist militias. In addition, they also provided training, which was conducted at the refugee camps in the major cities or at PLO bases in southern Lebanon, mainly in the Beqaa Valley (aka “Fatahland”). Geographic distribution The Persian (Persian language) word for Jalebi is "zoolbia." In Egypt, Lebanon and Syria it is known as "zalabia" (sometimes spelt as "zalabiya"). Recipe for Zalabiya In the Maldives it is known by the name "zilēbi." After graduation, Shaykh Faraz traveled with his family to Damascus, Syria, to formally seek Islamic knowledge. In Damascus, he studied Arabic (Arabic language), Aqidah (Islamic creed), Mantiq (Islamic Logic (Logic in Islamic philosophy)), Hanafi Fiqh (Hanafi), Shafi'I Fiqh (Shafi`i), Usul al-fiqh, and Hadith with a number of scholars including Shaykh Haytham Idilbi, Shaykh Abd al-Rahman Kharsa, Shaykh Abd al-Haleem Abu Sha`r, Shaykh Umar al-Sabbagh, Shaykh Jihad Brown, Shaykh Mu'min al-Annan, Shaykh Hassan al-Hindi, Sayyidi Shaykh Adib Kallas, Shaykh Muhammad Jumuah, Sh. Abd al-Razzaq al-Halabi (Abdul Razzaq al-Halabi), Shaykh Haytham, Shaykh Abd al-Haleem Abu Sha`r, and Ustadh Mahmud al-Bayruti. Biography He studied art first at the Städel Institute (Städel) in his native town, and then at Stuttgart and Munich. He painted many of his favourite subjects in his travels in the East. He first accompanied Prince Thurn and Taxis through Hungary, Wallachia, Russia and Turkey; then, in 1854, he followed the Austrian army across the Wallachian frontier. In 1856 he went to Egypt and Syria, and in 1861 to Algiers. In 1862 he settled in Paris, but returned to Germany in 1870; and settled at Cronberg near Frankfurt, where he died. *'''Mrs. Pollifax Unveiled''' (2000) Mrs. Pollifax teams up with freelance CIA agent John Farrell on an investigation into the disappearance of Amanda Pym in Syria. Ms. Pym was a fifteen-minute media superstar when she allegedly stopped an airplane hijacking from succeeding. Witnesses last saw Amanda enter a vehicle that waited for her at the Damascus Airport. Farrell and Mrs. Pollifax land in Syria where the government places a tail on the duo. However, they quickly elude their shadow in order to obtain information that provides them with the first clue in their hunt. They soon enter the Syrian Desert where they meet American archeologist Joe Fleming. Joining the two operatives on their quest, Joe and the two spies seek an elusive individual who seems to be undergoing a rigorous training for a mission that has world implications. The Byzantines regrouped and pushed back in 622 under Heraclius. Khosrau was defeated at the Battle of Nineveh (Battle of Nineveh (627)) in 627, and the Byzantines recaptured all of Syria and penetrated far into the Persian provinces of Mesopotamia. In 629, Khosrau's general Shahrbaraz agreed to peace, and the border between the two empires was once again the same as it was in 602. Language During the Rashidun Caliphate, the official language of Persia remained Persian (Old Persian), just as the official languages of Syria and Egypt remained Greek (Greek language) and Coptic (Coptic language). However, during the Ummayad Caliphate, the Ummayads imposed Arabic as the primary language of their subjected people throughout their empire, displacing their indigenous languages. Although an area from Iraq to Morocco speaks Arabic to this day, Middle Persian proved to be much more enduring. Most of its structure and vocabulary survived, evolving into the modern Persian language. However, Persian did incorporate a certain amount of Arabic vocabulary, especially words pertaining to religion, and it switched from the Pahlavi (Pahlavi scripts) Aramaic alphabet to a modified version of the Arabic alphabet. Commons:Category:Syria WikiPedia:Syria Dmoz:Regional Middle East Syria


Switzerland

; of Sicily, a gentle mystic whose teaching at many points resembled that of the early Quakers (Religious Society of Friends). Pursuing his religious travels, his family name and his personal charm ensured him a welcome in Switzerland, France, England and the Netherlands. commons:Confoederatio Helvetica


Poland

, English, and Italian but did not receive the same magnitude of the critical acclaim granted them by their Russian audiences. The Strugatsky brothers, however, were and still are popular in many countries, including Poland, Hungary, former Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, and Germany, where most of their works were available in both East and West Germany. *"The Sixteen" is an English choir performing early religious music. *Sixteen (Sixteen (band)) is a Polish band


India

Institute passed into its hands. In 1921 the Institute became the first in India to introduce Chemical Engineering as a discipline. By 1940, the institute had outgrown itself as more than just a small institute and was virtually functioning as an independent university. Jacques Dupuis became a Jesuit in 1941. After early religious and academic training in Belgium he left for India in 1948. A 3 year (1948–51) teaching experience at St. Xavier's Collegiate School, Calcutta


Copyright (C) 2015-2017 PlacesKnownFor.com
Last modified: Tue Oct 10 05:56:30 EDT 2017