Places Known For

design buildings


Pacific Grove, California

; In the middle of the 1890s Weeks had moved his family to Watsonville, and when he was in town he was active in his church, teaching Sunday School class when he could.<


Harlow

with their own shopping precincts, community facilities and pub (public house). Gibberd invited many of the country's leading post-war architects to design buildings in the town, including Philip Powell (Philip Powell (architect)) and Hidalgo Moya, Leonard Manasseh, Michael Neylan, E C P Monson, Gerard Goalen, Maxwell Fry, Jane Drew, Graham Dawbarn, H. T. Cadbury-Brown and William Crabtree. Harlow has one of the most extensive cycle track networks in the country, connecting all areas of the town to the town centre and industrial areas. The cycle network is composed mostly of the original old town roads. The town's authorities built Britain's first pedestrian precinct, Memorial University – Department of Geography – Harlow's History and Geography and first modern-style residential tower block, The Lawn, English Heritage – Images of England – The Lawn BBC News – ''Redeveloping Essex's fallen utopia '' constructed in 1951; it is now a Grade II listed building (listed building). Gibberd's tromp-l'oeil terrace in Orchard Croft and Dawbarn's maisonette blocks at Pennymead are also notable, as is Michael Neylan's pioneering development at Bishopsfield. The first neighbourhood, Mark Hall, is a conservation area. From 1894 to 1955, the Harlow parish formed part of the Epping Rural District of Essex. Vision of Britain – Harlow parish From 1955 to 1974, Harlow was an urban district (Urban district (Great Britain and Ireland)). Vision of Britain – Harlow UD The town centre, and many of its neighbourhood shopping facilities have undergone major redevelopment, along with many of the town's original buildings. Subsequently, many of the original town buildings, including most of its health centres, the Staple Tye shopping centre, and many industrial units have been rebuilt. GIbberd's original town hall, a landmark in the town, has been demolished and replaced by a new civic centre and shopping area. Redevelopment thumb The Chase housing development built circa 2007 between Old Harlow and Church Langley (File:The Chase - geograph.org.uk - 400869.jpg) Since becoming a new town, Harlow has undergone several stages of expansion, the first of which was the "mini expansion" that was created by the building of the Sumners and Katherines estates in the mid to late seventies to the west of the existing town. Since then Harlow has further expanded with the Church Langley estate completed in 2005, and its newest neighbourhood Newhall (Newhall, Essex) has completed the first stage of its development, with the second stage underway in 2013. The Harlow Gateway Scheme is currently underway, with the relocation of the Harlow Football Stadium to Barrow's Farm in early 2006, and the building of a new hotel, apartments, and a restaurant adjacent to the railway station being complete. The next stage of this scheme involves the completion of the 530 eco-homes being built on the former sports centre site, and the centre's relocation to the nearby former college playing field site. Other major developments under consideration include both a northern and southern bypass of the town, and significant expansion to the north, following the completed expansion to the east. The Harlow North Ropemaker Properties Limited – Harlow North plans, currently awaiting permission, involve an extension of the town across the floodplains on the town's northern border, into neighbouring Hertfordshire. The plan was supported by former MP Bill Rammell, all three political groups on Harlow Council, and the East of England Regional Assembly. It is opposed by Hertfordshire County Council, East Herts Council, Mark Prisk, MP for Hertford, and Stortford in whose constituency the development would be and all the parishes concerned. The opposition is coordinated by a local group based in neighbouring East Hertfordshire. Stop Harlow North Campaign Group An attempt to have Harlow North designated an "Eco Town" was rejected by the Minister for Housing, Caroline Flint, MP in April 2008 The south of the town centre also underwent major regeneration, with the new civic centre being built and the town's famous Water Gardens being redeveloped, a landscape listed by English Heritage. Their intended effect is somewhat spoiled by the abutment of a range of new shops, a major superstore, and several restaurants and cafés. It is likely that this development will be continued throughout the rest of the shopping district, with plans awaiting planning permission to be granted. In 2004 Harlow businessman Mo Ghadami triumphed in his High Court fight to block a multi-million pound extension of the town's Harvey Centre. The Iranian-born entrepreneur, who presented his case in person, persuaded Mr Justice Richards to quash Harlow DC's grant of planning permission for the development. In his judgment he backed Mr Ghadami's claim of 'apparent bias or predetermination' in the decision, as a result of the continued participation of Michael Garnett, the chairman of the planning committee, in the planning process after he had attempted in telephone calls to persuade Mr Ghadami to consent to the scheme. http: www.lgcplus.com harlow-planning-committee-chairmans-calls-to-objector-under-scrutiny 1231710.article Economy Harlow was originally expected to provide a majority of employment opportunities in manufacturing, with two major developments of The Pinnacles and Templefields providing the biggest employers in the region; as with the rest of the country, this manufacturing base has declined and Harlow has had to adjust. The original manufacturing took the form of a biscuit factory, on the Pinnacles. Owned and run as a Co-Op, it provided employment to the town for over 50 years, before closing in 2002. It has since been demolished and the site is now small industrial units. At its peak, the factory employed over 500 people. At the time of its closure, the owner was Burton's Foods Ltd. An £8&nbsp;million production line – installed in 1999 – was left to rust in the car park upon the closure of the factory. Raytheon and GlaxoSmithKline both have large premises within the town. Nortel also had a large site on the eastern edge of the town, acquired when STC (Standard Telephones and Cables) was bought in 1991, and it was here that Charles K. Kao developed optical fibre data transmission. Nortel still has a presence, but it is much reduced. One of Europe's leading online golf stores, Onlinegolf, is also based in Harlow. Unemployment is frequently around 10%, higher than the national average in the UK. Harlow also has a large number of people in social housing, almost 30% Harlow District Council – Harlow: A Comparison with Essex 2001 Census of dwellings being housing association and local authority owned, and many more privately rented. Politics :''See also: Harlow (UK Parliament constituency), Harlow District Council elections'' The Member of parliament (MP) for Harlow (Harlow (UK Parliament constituency)) since the 2010 general election (United Kingdom general election, 2010) is Conservative (Conservative Party (UK)) Robert Halfon. He defeated Labour's (Labour Party (UK)) Bill Rammell who had been the MP since the 1997 election (United Kingdom general election, 1997), but had only held the seat at the 2005 general election (United Kingdom general election, 2005) by a majority of 97 votes. Elections to the district council are held in three out of every four years, with one third of the 33 seats on the council being elected at each election. Labour had a majority from the first election in 1973 until the 2002 election (Harlow District Council election, 2002). From then until the 2008 election (Harlow District Council election, 2008) no party had a majority. The Conservatives gained control in 2008, but lost it back to Labour at the 2012 election (Harlow District Council election, 2012) and as of the 2014 election (Harlow District Council election, 2014), the council is composed of the following councillors:- '''Matthew John Spring''' (born 17 November 1979, in Harlow, Essex) is an English central midfielder who plays for Leyton Orient (Leyton Orient F.C.). DATE OF BIRTH 17 November 1979 PLACE OF BIRTH Harlow, England DATE OF DEATH


Salinas, California

under syndication exclusivity. In 1894 Weeks opened an office in Watsonville (Watsonville, California), and was employed as the designer for several projects in town. His business prospered, and in 1897 he opened a branch office in Salinas (Salinas, California), where he then spent part of his work-week. As Weeks' business continued to grow, he began to bid to design buildings in Monterey, California Monterey


Monterey, California

DATE OF DEATH In 1894 Weeks opened an office in Watsonville (Watsonville, California), and was employed as the designer for several projects in town. His business prospered, and in 1897 he opened a branch office in Salinas (Salinas, California), where he then spent part of his work-week. As Weeks' business continued to grow, he began to bid to design buildings in Monterey (Monterey, California), Pacific


Moscow

Dmoz:Regional Europe Russia Administrative Regions Moscow Commons:Category:Moscow Wikipedia:Moscow


Saint Petersburg

by art historians to a style of Baroque architecture and decoration favoured by Peter the Great and employed to design buildings in the newly-founded Russian capital, Saint Petersburg, under this monarch and his immediate successors. Unlike contemporaneous Naryshkin Baroque, favoured in Moscow, the Petrine Baroque represented a drastic rupture with Byzantine traditions that had dominated Russian architecture for almost a millennium. Its chief practitioners – Domenico Trezzini, Andreas Schlüter, and Mikhail Zemtsov – drew inspiration from a rather modest Dutch, Danish, and Swedish architecture of the time. Extant examples of the style in St Petersburg are the Peter and Paul Cathedral, the Twelve Colleges, the Kunstkamera, Kikin Hall and Menshikov Palace.The Petrine Baroque structures outside St Petersburg are scarce; they include the Menshikov Tower in Moscow and the Kadriorg Palace in Tallinn. Absolutism During the age of Absolutism (Absolutism (European history)), especially in France, equestrian statues were popular with rulers; Louis XIV was typical in having one outside his Palace of Versailles, and the over life-size statue in the Place Vendôme in Paris by François Girardon (1699) is supposed to be the first large modern equestrian statue to be cast in a single piece; it was destroyed in the French Revolution, though there is a small version in the Louvre. The near life-size equestrian statue of Charles I of England by Hubert Le Sueur of 1633 at Charing Cross in London is the earliest large English example, which was followed by many. The ''Bronze Horseman'' ( commons:Category:Saint Petersburg WikiPedia:Saint Petersburg Dmoz:Regional Europe Russia Administrative Regions Saint Petersburg


Greece

and western artwork and Egyptian glass work found in Punic tombs, notably in masks which the Phoenician used to drive out evil spirits or demons of death with their decorations, such as the lotus motifs found on many objects or in the artistic design buildings. The paintings and sculptures of the lids of sarcophagi from the necropolis of Carthage and El Alia, the architecture of the mausoleum of Dougga are characterized by the combined influence of Greece and Egypt. ref name "Rombaldi"


Egypt

of Tunisian cultural history was shaped by Carthaginian influences including Phoenician, Greek (Greece) and Egyptian. There is much evidence of Phoenician and western artwork and Egyptian glass work found in Punic tombs, notably in masks which the Phoenician used to drive out evil spirits or demons of death with their decorations, such as the lotus motifs found on many objects or in the artistic design buildings. The paintings and sculptures of the lids of sarcophagi from the necropolis


Russia

#Condominiums condominium of the Old Swiss Confederacy ). He probably studied in Rome. Subsequently, as he was working in Denmark, he was offered by Peter I of Russia, among other architects, to design buildings in the new Russian capital city, St. Petersburg. The first public performance was given on 7 December 1878 in St. Petersburg, by the Клуб художников Artists' Club . Thereafter it proved to be one of the few operas by Cui that was popular in Imperial Russia. Soon after the composer's death, however, the opera seemed to have disappeared from the repertory in Russia. It was revived, however, in 1998 by the Pokrovsky Chamber Music Theater in Moscow in a modified production. thumb 100px left Sobinov as Muri, probably 1901-1902 (Image:SobinovAsMuri CuiIP 296 300.jpg) thumb Crimean Tatars Crimean Tatar (File:Crimean Tatar hat - Tubeteika.jpg) tubeteika. A '''tubeteika''' or '''tübätäy''' ( Commons:Category:Russia WikiPedia:Russia Dmoz:Regional Europe Russia


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