Places Known For

culture national


History of the National Park Service

on military reservations; thumb 300 px right Fort Matanzas National Monument (File:Fortwestern.jpg) class "wikitable" border "1" - ! Year ! ! Monument - 1910 June 23 Big Hole Battlefield (Big Hole National Battlefield), Mont. - 1913 Oct. 14 Cabrillo (Cabrillo National Monument), Calif. - 1923 March 2 Mound City, Ohio (now Hopewell Culture National Historical Park) - Fort Marion, Fla. (now Castillo de San Marcos National Monument


Białystok

, and the surrounding Podlaskie region, roughly corresponding to the territory of the earlier Belostok Oblast. WikiPedia:Białystok Commons:Białystok


Burkina Faso

-numbered years; Africa's largest film festival held every other year brings stars and filmmakers from across the continent. *'''Semaine National de la Culture''' (National Culture Week)—Bobo; March April; music, dance, theater, and masquerades fill the air this week in Bobo Do Starting in Gorom Gorom, you can take a camel ride out into the desert and even sleep out there on the sand. Guides can arrange this for you from Gorom Gorom and it can be expensive if you do not pick your guides


Second Polish Republic

corresponding to the territory of the earlier Belostok Oblast. DATE OF BIRTH August 13, 1929 PLACE OF BIRTH Równe (Rivne), Poland (Second Polish Republic) (now Rivne, Ukraine) DATE OF DEATH April 10, 2010


Columbus, Ohio

: www.webcitation.org query?url http: www.geocities.com Athens oracle 2596 hopewell.html&date 2009-10-25+06:24:47 archivedate 2009-10-25 The Hopewell Culture National Historical Park, encompassing mounds for which the culture is named, is in the Paint Creek (Paint Creek (Ohio)) Valley just a few miles from Chillicothe, Ohio. Other earthworks in the Chillicothe area include Hopeton (Hopeton Earthworks), Mound City (Hopewell Culture National Historical Park), Seip


Mobile, Alabama

See also Lt. Beedy said that if the fire had gotten worse than it was, there could have been injuries or deaths, saying "He endangered a lot of people." According to Lt. Beedy, building security cameras caught Shorrosh on camera entering and exiting the trash room of the building. Police Chief David Carpenter told WKRG (w:WKRG) ''News 5'', the CBS (w:CBS) affiliate in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), that Shorrosh used an accelerant (w:accelerant) to start the fire, in what police believe was an attempt to burn the building down. The Government Accountability Office (w:Government Accountability Office) on June 18 called for a re-run of the bidding for the U.S. Air Force $40 billion tanker contract (w:KC-X), citing major flaws in the procurement process. This imperils the Northrop Grumman (w:Northrop Grumman) and EADS North America (w:EADS North America) plan to assemble the planes in Mobile (w:Mobile, Alabama), Alabama (w:Alabama).


Cyprus

Exodus 30), has only two horns (as opposed to four in other known examples), perhaps indicating a unique type of Philistine altar, perhaps influenced from Cypriot (Cyprus), and perhaps Minoan (Minoan civilization), culture. National State flag The ensign of Northern Cypriot Turkish Peoples retains the white field of the flag of Cyprus. The crescent with the star is the symbol of the Turkic peoples. Countries in Europe that have active


Burma

and have mediated change between their traditional local culture, national Thai and global cultural influences. Overseas Chinese also form a significant part of Thai society, particularly in and around Bangkok. Their successful integration into Thai society has allowed for this group to hold positions of economic and political power. Indianized kingdoms such as the Mon (Mon (ethnic group)), Khmer (Khmer people) and Malay (Malays (ethnic group)) kingdoms had ruled the region. Thai people established their own states starting with Sukhothai (Sukhothai kingdom), Chiang Saen (Amphoe Chiang Saen) and Chiang Mai and Lanna Kingdom and then Ayutthaya kingdom. These states fought each other and were under constant threat from the Khmers, Burma and Vietnam. Much later, the European colonial powers threatened in the 19th and early 20th centuries, but Thailand survived as the only Southeast Asian state to avoid European colonial (colonialism) rule. After the end of the absolute monarchy in 1932, Thailand endured sixty years of almost permanent military rule before the establishment of a democratic elected-government system. After more than 400 years of power, in 1767, the Kingdom of Ayutthaya was brought down by invading Burmese (Burma) armies, its capital burned, and the territory split. General Taksin (now known as King Taksin the Great) managed to reunite the Thai kingdom from his new capital of Thonburi and declared himself king in 1769. However, later due to stress and many factors, King Taksin went mad. General Chakri (later becoming Rama I) helped run the empire instead. The King Taksin ordained as a monk and ventured into the forest and never to be seen again. General Chakri succeeded him in 1782 as Rama I (Buddha Yodfa Chulaloke), the first king of the Chakri dynasty. In the same year he founded the new capital city at Bangkok, across the Chao Phraya river from Thonburi, Taksin's capital. In the 1790s Burma was defeated and driven out of Siam (Thailand), as it was then called. Lanna also became free of Burmese occupation, but the king of a new dynasty who was installed in the 1790s was effectively a tributary ruler of the Chakri monarch. thumb Seasonal flooding in Thailand and Cambodia. (Image:Seasonal flooding in Thailand and Cambodia.jpg) thumb Hundreds of active fires burning across the hills and valleys of Burma Myanmar (Image:Fires in Burma, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam.jpg) Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam (labelled with red dots). Thailand's economy functions as an anchor economy for the neighboring developing economies of Laos, Burma, and Cambodia. Thailand's recovery from the 1997–1998 Asian financial crisis depended mainly on exports, among various other factors. Thailand ranks high among the world's automotive export industries along with manufacturing of electronic goods. Illicit drugs A minor producer of opium, heroin, and marijuana (cannabis (drug)); major illicit transit point for heroin en route to the international drug market from Burma and Laos; eradication efforts have reduced the area of cannabis cultivation and shifted some production to neighboring countries; opium poppy cultivation has been reduced by eradication efforts; also a drug money-laundering center; minor role in amphetamine (amfetamine) production for regional consumption; increasing indigenous abuse of methamphetamines and heroin. quote The British Library's collections relating to Thailand include the account by Peter Floris written in 1612 (IOR, L MAR A XIII, ff.28 29), a member of the expedition, and other records of early East India Company trading activities in Siam. Conflicts with the East India Company during the reign of Ayutthayan (Ayutthaya Kingdom) King Narai resulted in the Siam–England war (Siam–England war (1687)) of 1687, after which the English were banned from Siam. Søren Mentz p.228 After Burma lost the First Anglo-Burmese War (1824–1826,) relations opened between the Rattanakosin Kingdom of Siam and the United Kingdom (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland) with a treaty of amity and commerce (Treaty of Amity and Commerce (Siam–UK)) negotiated by East India Company emissary Henry Burney (also called the Burney Treaty.) This was followed by the Bowring Treaty of 1855 to liberalise trade. In 1893, Lord Lansdowne (Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne) of the British Raj finalized the border between Burma and Siam; the Anglo-Siamese Treaty of 1909 then dissected the northern Malay states. In 1917 the modern Siamese kingdom (Rattanakosin Kingdom#From Kingdom to the Modern Nation) declared war on Germany during World War I, which secured it a seat at the Versailles Peace Conference. Foreign Minister Devawongse used this as an opportunity to argue for the repeal of the 19th century treaties and restoration of full Siamese sovereignty. While Britain and France delayed until 1925, the United States obliged in 1920. Following the outbreak of World War II (History of Thailand (1932–1973)#World War II), relations with Britain, France and the United States deteriorated rapidly — though former Queen Ramphaiphanni was nominal head of the Seri Thai resistance movement in Great Britain. Japan allowed Thailand to resume sovereignty over the sultanates of northern Malaya that had been lost in the 1909 treaty with Britain, and to invade and annex the Shan States in northern Burma. After the Japanese surrender, Allied military responsibility for Thailand fell to the British, who favoured treating the kingdom as a defeated enemy. Americans, however, supported Thailand's new government; during the Cold War relations with the United Kingdom took a back seat to those with the United States. quote The British Library's collections relating to Thailand include the account by Peter Floris written in 1612 (IOR, L MAR A XIII, ff.28 29), a member of the expedition, and other records of early East India Company trading activities in Siam. Conflicts with the East India Company during the reign of Ayutthayan (Ayutthaya Kingdom) King Narai resulted in the Siam–England war (Siam–England war (1687)) of 1687, after which the English were banned from Siam. Søren Mentz p.228 After Burma lost the First Anglo-Burmese War (1824–1826,) relations opened between the Rattanakosin Kingdom of Siam and the United Kingdom (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland) with a treaty of amity and commerce (Treaty of Amity and Commerce (Siam–UK)) negotiated by East India Company emissary Henry Burney (also called the Burney Treaty.) This was followed by the Bowring Treaty of 1855 to liberalise trade. In 1893, Lord Lansdowne (Henry Petty-Fitzmaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne) of the British Raj finalized the border between Burma and Siam; the Anglo-Siamese Treaty of 1909 then dissected the northern Malay states. In 1917 the modern Siamese kingdom (Rattanakosin Kingdom#From Kingdom to the Modern Nation) declared war on Germany during World War I, which secured it a seat at the Versailles Peace Conference. Foreign Minister Devawongse used this as an opportunity to argue for the repeal of the 19th century treaties and restoration of full Siamese sovereignty. While Britain and France delayed until 1925, the United States obliged in 1920. Following the outbreak of World War II (History of Thailand (1932–1973)#World War II), relations with Britain, France and the United States deteriorated rapidly — though former Queen Ramphaiphanni was nominal head of the Seri Thai resistance movement in Great Britain. Japan allowed Thailand to resume sovereignty over the sultanates of northern Malaya that had been lost in the 1909 treaty with Britain, and to invade and annex the Shan States in northern Burma. After the Japanese surrender, Allied military responsibility for Thailand fell to the British, who favoured treating the kingdom as a defeated enemy. Americans, however, supported Thailand's new government; during the Cold War relations with the United Kingdom took a back seat to those with the United States. Today, all nations use standard time zones for secular purposes, but they do not all apply the concept as originally conceived. Newfoundland (Newfoundland and Labrador), India, Iran, Afghanistan, Venezuela, Burma, the Marquesas (Marquesas Islands), as well as parts of Australia use half-hour deviations from standard time, and some nations, such as Nepal, and some provinces, such as the Chatham Islands, use quarter-hour deviations. Some countries, most notably China (People's Republic of China) and India, use a single time zone, even though the extent of their territory far exceeds 15° of longitude. Before 1949, China used five time zones (see Time in China). According to Mahavamsa the Sri Lanka chronicle, after the conclusion of the Third Buddhist Council, a missionary was also sent to Suvannabhumi where two monks Sona and Uttara, are said to have proceeded. ''Mahavamsa: The great chronicle of Ceylon'' tr. Wilhelm Geiger. Pali Text Society, 1912, Page 82 and 86 Scholar opinions differ as to where exactly this land of Suvannabhumi is located, but Suvannabhumi is believed to be located somewhere in the area which now includes lower Burma, Thailand, Malay Peninsula and Sumatra Island. The UNCCD has '''194''' country Parties: Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Andorra, Angola, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, The Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei Darussalam, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burma, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, the People's Republic of China, Colombia, Comoros, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Republic of the Congo, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, European Union, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, The Gambia, Georgia (Georgia (country)), Germany, Ghana, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, the Republic of Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, South Korea, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia (Republic of Macedonia), Provisionally referred to as the "former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia"; see Macedonia naming dispute. Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, São Tomé and Príncipe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Thailand, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe Urdu is the national and one of the two official languages of Pakistan, the other being English, and is spoken and understood throughout the country, while the state-by-state languages (languages spoken throughout various regions) are the provincial languages (Provincial languages of Pakistan). It is used in education (Education in Pakistan), literature (Pakistani literature), office and court business. In the lower courts in Pakistan, despite the proceedings taking place in Urdu, the documents are in English whilst in the higher courts, ie the High Courts and the Supreme Court (Supreme Court of Pakistan), both documents and proceedings are in English. It holds in itself a repository of the cultural (Culture of Pakistan) and social (Pakistan#Culture) heritage of the country. Zia, Khaver (1999), "A Survey of Standardisation in Urdu". 4th Symposium on Multilingual Information Processing, (MLIT-4), Yangon, Myanmar (Burma). CICC, Japan Although English is used in most elite circles, and Punjabi (Punjabi language) has a plurality of native speakers, Urdu is the lingua franca and national language in Pakistan. thumb Hundreds of active fires burning across the hills and valleys of Burma Myanmar (Image:Fires in Burma, Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam.jpg) Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam (labelled with red dots). Background The term derives from the sacred white elephants (White elephant (pachyderm)) kept by Southeast Asian monarchs in Burma, Thailand, "Royal Elephant Stable". Thai Elephant Conservation Center. Laos and Cambodia. To possess a white elephant was regarded (and is still regarded in Thailand and Burma) as a sign that the monarch reigned with justice and power, and that the kingdom was blessed with peace and prosperity. The tradition derives from tales which associate a white elephant with the birth of the Buddha (Gautama Buddha), as his mother was reputed to have dreamed of a white elephant presenting her with a lotus flower (Nelumbo nucifera), a symbol of wisdom and purity, on the eve of giving birth. . The Hmong are known in China as the ''Miao'', a designation that embraces several different ethnic groups. There is debate about usage of this term, especially amongst Hmong living in the West, as it is believed by some to be derogatory, although Hmong living in China still call themselves by this name. Chinese scholars have recorded contact with the Miao as early as the 3rd century BCE, and wrote of them that they were a proud and independent people. However, after the Ming Dynasty and Qing Dynasty attempted to impose several new taxation systems and continued expansion of their empire, the Hmong are reported to have rebelled. Many wars were randomness fought, and eventually many Hmong were pushed from China into Burma (Myanmar), Laos, Thailand and Vietnam. The history of the Hmong people is difficult to trace; they have an oral tradition, but there are no written records except where other people have encountered them. Hmong history has been passed down through legends and ritual ceremonies from one generation to another. Najmul Millat was a contemporary of Ziauddin al-Iraqi, Kazim Tabatabai Yazdi and Abul Hasan Isfehani. He was a Faqih of the highest rank and trained several Ulama like Sibte Hasan, Adeel Akhtar and Kitayat Husain. CHAPTER 2 THE FUQAHA He will always be remembered for his services to the Shi'a (Shia Islam) of Tibet, Burma, Africa and countries in the West rendered through the missionaries trained in his Jamia Nazmia. He wrote several books. * Three novels effectively tell the story of Burma (w:Burma)'s recent history. The link begins with Burmese Days (w:Burmese Days), which chronicles the country's history under British colonialism. Not long after Burma became independent from Britain in 1948, a military dictator sealed off the country from the outside world, launched 'The Burmese Way to Socialism', and turned Burma into one of the poorest countries in Asia. The same story is told in ''Animal Farm (w:Animal farm)''. Finally in ''Nineteen Eighty-Four'' Orwell's description of a horrifying and soulless dystopia paints a chillingly accurate picture of Burma today, a country ruled by one of the world's most brutal and tenacious dictatorships. In Burma there is a joke that Orwell wrote not just one novel about the country, but three: a trilogy comprised of ''Burmese Days'', ''Animal Farm'' and ''Nineteen Eighty-Four''. ** Emma Larkin (w:Emma Larkin), ''Finding George Orwell in Burma'', p. 3. *My attitude to peace is rather based on the Burmese (w:Burma) definition of peace - it really means removing all the negative factors that destroy peace in this world. So peace does not mean just putting an end to violence or to war, but to all other factors that threaten peace, such as discrimination, such as inequality (w:inequality), poverty. **Aung San Suu Kyi, in Suu Kyi gives Nobel speech in Norway, 21 years later *Ahoms, a tribe from Burma (w:Burma), who controlled the region from thirteenth to eighteenth centuries, who absorbed Hindu culture (w:Hindu culture), were the original builders of Guwahati’ most famous site, a shrine to the goddess Sati (w:Sati), also known as Kali (w:Kali), consort of Shiva (w:Shiva). **Anthony Levi, Trudy Ring, in Robert M. Salkin, Sharon La Boda, "International Dictionary of Historic Places: Asia and Oceania", p. 308. *Experimental gardens Tree that bears Qunine were opened on the Nilgiri Mountains (w:Nilgiri mountains) of Southern India (w:South India), the Himalayas on the north of Bengal (w:Bengal), the hills of Assam (w:Assam) and the Northwest Provinces, and on the highlands of Burma (w:Burma). With the exception of the Nilgiri and Himalayas, these localities were found to be unfavorable. At Darjeeling (w:Darjeeling) in the Himalayas, four hundred miles north of Calcutta, near which the cinchona (w:Cinchona)-gardens are located, … Cinchona alkaloid (w:Qunine) is now largely used throughout the country, with a proportionate reduction in the demand for quinine (w:Qunine). **Quinine (w:Quinine) in “The Tree That Bears Quinine” by Otis Robinson Bacheler quoted in: Science Monthly Volume 21 May 1882 , Wikisource. right thumb Saraswati, the goddess of knowledge is worthy of eulogisation - Sama Veda (File:Mysore_Painting.jpg). '''Saraswati (w:Saraswati)''' (Sanskrit (w;Sankrit language): सरस्वती, Sarasvatī ?) is the Hindu goddess of knowledge, music, arts, wisdom and nature. She is a part of the trinity of Saraswati, Lakshmi and Parvati. All the three forms help the trinity of Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva in the creation, maintenance and destruction of the Universe. The Goddess is also revered by believers of the Jain religion (w:Jain religion )of west and central India. She is known in Burmese (w:Burma) as Thurathadi or Tipitaka Medaw , in Chinese (w:Chinese language) as Biàncáitiān (辯才天), in Japanese as Benzaiten (弁才天 弁財天) and in Thai (w:Thai language) as Surasawadee (สุรัสวดี). Of the countries ratifying the treaty, the largest are (in order of decreasing population) India (w:India), Pakistan (w:Pakistan), Bangladesh (w:Bangladesh), Japan (w:Japan), Mexico (w:Mexico), Thailand (w:Thailand), France (w:France), and Burma (w:Burma). Nations that have signed but not yet ratified include China (w:China), USA (w:USA), Brazil (w:Brazil), Nigeria (w:Nigeria), Philippines (w:Philippines), Viet Nam (w:Vietnam), Germany (w:Germany), and Egypt (w:Egypt). The largest non-signers are Indonesia (w:Indonesia), Russia (w:Russia), Colombia (w:Colombia), Tanzania (w:Tanzania), and Uzbekistan (w:Uzbekistan). The Himalayan (w:Himalayas) kingdom of Bhutan (w:Bhutan) went beyond the treaty requirements when on December 17 it became the first country in the world to completely ban the sale of tobacco. Prominent guests included Viscount Slim (w:Viscount Slim) (son of the late Field Marshal Slim (w:William Slim, 1st Viscount Slim), commander of the British Fourteenth Army (w:British Fourteenth Army) in Burma (w:Burma)), Countess Mountbatten of Burma (w:Patricia Knatchbull, 2nd Countess Mountbatten of Burma) (daughter of the late Lord Louis Mountbatten (w:Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma), Supreme Allied Commander South East Asia Theatre), and Dame Vera Lynn (w:Vera Lynn). The report comes just days ahead of an Asian political summit, where the foreign ministers of many of the countries already affected by the H5N1 (w:H5N1) virus are expected to agree to even closer co-operative measures to help stall the advance of the virus. The foreign ministers of Cambodia (w:Cambodia), Laos (w:Laos), Burma (w:Burma), Thailand (w:Thailand) and Vietnam (w:Vietnam) have already agreed to closer co-operation to contain the virus and develop a vaccine. Aung San Suu Kyi sentenced to another three years of house arrest Aung San Suu Kyi (w:Aung San Suu Kyi) has been sentenced by a court in Burma (w:Burma) to a further three years of house arrest (w:House arrest) for violating the terms of her previous sentence. However her sentence was immediately commuted to 18 months on the orders of Burmese head of state (w:Head of state) Senior-General Than Shwe (w:Than Shwe) out of respect for her father General Aung San (w:Aung San) and out of a desire for "national reconciliation".


Cambodia

Some cultures bury (Burial) the placenta for various reasons. The Māori (Māori people) of New Zealand traditionally bury the placenta from a newborn child to emphasize the relationship between humans and the earth. Metge, Joan. 2005. "Working in Playing with three languages: English, Te Reo Maori, and Maori


Moscow

parents were evacuated to the Soviet rear as workers with a military-critical industrial company. Lanovoy has always positioned himself as a Ukrainian loyal to national culture (Ukrainian culture), especially the Ukrainian folk music pieces of which he traditionally sings at his individual concerts. DATE OF BIRTH 1934-01-16 PLACE OF BIRTH Moscow, Russian SSR, Soviet Union DATE OF DEATH The strengthening of ties with Moscow, caused by economic development


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