Places Known For

close support


Södertälje

as trucks and buses. Over the succeeding years, the company, based in Södertälje, Sweden, developed an enviable reputation for the toughness, comfort and reliability of its commercial vehicles. The 1963 LB76 was the model that forged the Scania-Vabis reputation outside Sweden. This forward-control design was one of the first exhaustively crash-tested truck cabs. Image:Scania-Vabis SAVm43 close-support artillery vehicle.jpg thumb 250px right 1940s Scania-Vabis SAV m43 Close-Support Artillery


Chongjin

massive attacks late in November, United Nations forces commenced a general withdrawal to consolidate and hold south of the 38th parallel. ''Saint Paul'' provided close support for the Republic of Korea I Corps on their east flank as they withdrew from Hapsu, and along the coast, as they retired from Chongjin. On 2 December, she moved north again, conducted night harassing missions above Chongjin, then moved south to support the withdrawal of the Republic of Korea Capital Division to Kyongsong Man. She entered the harbor at Wonsan on 3 December to provide a curtain of shellfire around that city as United Nations forces and equipment were moved to Hungnam; then followed the forces there, and remained to cover the evacuation of that city and harbor between 10 December and 24 December. As the Chinese Communists began massive attacks late in November, United Nations forces commenced a general withdrawal to consolidate and hold south of the 38th parallel. ''Saint Paul'' provided close support for the Republic of Korea I Corps on their east flank as they withdrew from Hapsu, and along the coast, as they retired from Chongjin. On 2 December, she moved north again, conducted night harassing missions above Chongjin, then moved south to support the withdrawal of the Republic of Korea Capital Division to Kyongsong Man. She entered the harbor at Wonsan on 3 December to provide a curtain of shellfire around that city as United Nations forces and equipment were moved to Hungnam; then followed the forces there, and remained to cover the evacuation of that city and harbor between 10 December and 24 December. ''Saint Paul'' returned to the United States for yard work at San Francisco, California, from June to September, then conducted underway training before sailing on 5 November for Korea. She arrived off Wonsan on 27 November and commenced gun strike missions in support of the UN blockade (Blockade of Wonsan). During the following weeks, she bombarded strategic points at Hungnam, Songjin, and Chongjin. In December, she served as an antiaircraft escort for TF 77, and, following a holiday trip to Japan, returned to operations off the coast of North Korea. In April 1952, ''Saint Paul'' participated in combined air-sea attacks against the ports of Wonsan and Chongjin. Chung’s talent for business became apparent during his trips into town where he would sell wood. The fast paced atmosphere of the town along with the articles in newspapers he read sparked his imagination and he soon grew tired of the poverty that he and his family had to endure. At the age of sixteen, Chung and a friend decided to travel to the city of Chongjin for work in hopes of escaping the harsh realities of farm life. Chung ju yung After a 15-mile trek through the most dangerous parts of the Paechun valley, the pair reached the town of Kowon where they took up jobs as construction workers (Construction). They worked long hours for low pay but Chung enjoyed the fact that he could independently earn money. Chung & his friend continued the work for two months until Chung's father found their whereabouts. ''Bremerton'' was recommissioned 23 November 1951. After refresher training she joined the 7th Fleet for her first cruise of the Korean War zone. Her guns blasted enemy lines at Wonsan, Kojo, Chongjin, and Changjon Hang, Korea. On 13 September 1952 she was relieved and returned to Long Beach (Long Beach, California). 1952 By this time, the conflict had altered in character, from quick forceful action to perseverance in the systematic destruction of the enemy's personnel and equipment. To this purpose, TF 95 maintained a blockade along the entire Korean coast and bombarded the Communist's main supply routes, which, because of the mountainous terrain, lay on the narrow coastal plains. ''Manchester'' patrolled along the Korean Peninsula shelling military targets in areas such as Chinnamp’o, Chongjin, Tong’Cho-Ri as well as regularly returning to Hungnam, Songjin, and Wonsan to add to the destruction of those tightly held enemy positions. While her guns blasted, ''Manchester’s'' helicopters continued her reputation as a good friend of downed pilots, performing rescues at sea and on land behind enemy lines. Her medical officers also worked overtime aiding sick and wounded members of the U.N. Forces. North Hamgyong Province Hamgyongbuk-do Hamkyeongpukto 함경북도 咸鏡北道 Province Chongjin Kwanbuk 2,327,362 KP-09 - On 7 January 1953, she sailed, with her division, for the Far East. Steaming via the Panama Canal, she arrived at Sasebo (Sasebo, Nagasaki), Japan, 12 February; joined the 7th Fleet (US 7th Fleet); and immediately commenced operations off the embattled Korean peninsula. ''Owen'' divided her five months tour with the United Nations Force between the fast carriers (TG 77) and the Blockade and Escort Force (TF 95). With the former, her operations were similar to her World War II missions—screening and plane guard. With the latter, she patrolled from Wonsan to Chongjin and acted as flagship for the Yong Do and Wonsan Defense and Blockade Units. Defense of friendly islands, coastal patrol, shore bombardment to silence enemy batteries and impede their transport and communications activities, and mine (Naval mine) destruction were included in these assignments. Korean War With the expansion of the fleet in the Korean War, ''Erben'' was recommissioned 19 May 1951, and sailed from Long Beach, her home port, 27 August for Yokosuka (United States Fleet Activities Yokosuka). At once she joined the destroyer screen protecting carriers of Task Force 77 from submarine attack. In late September and October, she bombarded shore targets in the Songjin-Chongjin area, disrupting enemy communications and supply routes, and on 9 October, rescuing a North Korean fleeing the Communists in a small boat. After joining in antisubmarine warfare exercises off Okinawa, she returned to screening duty, rescuing a downed pilot 2 December. She accompanied


Bissau

*Cape Verde - António Coutinho de Lencastre, Governor of Cape Verde (1803-1818) *Bissau - António Cardoso Figueiredo, Captain-Major of Bissau *Cacheu - Unknown image_map_caption Portuguese Guinea capital Bissau (Cacheu (1558-1697)) latd 2 latm 11 lats 20 latNS N longd 102 longm 23 longs 4 longEW E thumb 140px left The flag of the Guinea Company (Image:Portugueseguineacompanyflag.svg), a Portuguese company that traded in several commodities and slaves around the Guinea coast from the 15th century. Though the Kingdom of Portugal had claimed the area four years earlier, Portuguese (Portugal) explorer Nuno Tristão sailed around the coast of West Africa, reaching the Guinea area in about 1450, searching for the source of gold and other valuable commodities that had slowly been trickling up into Europe via land routes for the preceding half century. Sometime later, slaves (African slave trade) were also added to the list. Portuguese Guinea had been part of the Sahel Empire, and the local Landurna and Naula tribes traded in salt and grew rice. Like in many other regions across Africa, powerful indigenous kingdoms along the Bight of Benin relied heavily on a long established slave trade (African slave trade). The Ashanti (The Ashanti) exploited their military predominance to bring slaves to coastal forts established first by Portugal after 1480, and then soon afterwards by the Dutch, Danish, and English. The slaving network quickly expanded deep into the Sahel, where the Mossi (Mossi people) diverted an ancient slaving trade away from the Mediterranean towards the Gold Coast (Gold Coast (region)). Edward Brynn, Slavery in the Sahel, University of North Carolina With the help of local tribes in about 1600, the Portuguese, and numerous other European powers, including France, Britain (United Kingdom) and Sweden, set up a thriving slave trade along the West African coast. However, the local black African rulers in Guinea, who prospered greatly from the slave trade (African slave trade), had no interest in allowing the white Europeans any further inland than the fortified coastal settlements where the trading took place. The Portuguese presence in Guinea was therefore largely limited to the port of Bissau and Cacheu. For a brief period in the 1790s the British attempt to establish a rival foothold on an offshore island, at Bolama. But by the 19th century the Portuguese were sufficiently secure in Bissau to regard the neighbouring coastline as their own special territory, also in part of present southern Senegal. According to the estimates of Hugh Thomas, a total of 11,128,000 African slaves were delivered live to the New World, including 500,000 to British North America; therefore, only 4.5% of the total African slaves delivered to the New World were delivered to British North America. Also from Hugh Thomas, the major sources of the 13 million slaves departing from Africa were Congo (Congo Basin) Angola (3 million), Gold Coast (Gold Coast (region)) (1.5 million), Slave Coast (2 million), Kingdom of Benin to Calabar (2 million), and Mozambique Madagascar on the east coast of Africa (1 million). THE ATLANTIC SLAVE TRADE AND SLAVERY IN AMERICA, NEIL A. FRANKEL A large part of all slaves imported from Africa were bound for the Brazilian colonies (Colonial Brazil). Cacheu, in Guinea-Bissau, was one of the largest slave markets in Africa for a time. After the abolition of slavery in the 1830s, the slave trade went into serious decline, though a small illegal slaving operation continued. Bissau, founded in 1765, became the Portuguese Guinea colony's capital. Though the coast had been under firm Portuguese control for the past four centuries, it was not until the Scramble for Africa that any interest was taken in the inland part of the colony. The remains of the Kaabu kingdom were under Fula (Fula people) control until the Portuguese suppression of the kingdom around the turn of the 20th century. However, a large tract of land that was formerly Portuguese was lost to French West Africa, including the prosperous Casamance River area, which had been a large commercial centre for the colony. Britain tried to take control of Bolama, which lead to an international dispute that came close to war between Britain and Portugal until U.S. (USA) president Ulysses S. Grant intervened and prevented a conflict by ruling that Bolama belonged to Portugal. ideology Socialism, Marxism, Nationalism headquarters Bissau, Bissau Region, Guinea-Bissau international Socialist International


Grodno

(Germany) Fliegerkorps VIII's close support aircraft were able to break the backbone of Western Front's counter-attack at Grodno. 6th Cavalry Corps was so badly mauled by this aerial onslaught against its columns that it was unable to deploy for attack. Jagdgeschwader 53's Hermann Neuhoff recalled:


Portuguese Guinea

West Africa Angola in the close-support role. Nicolli 2003, p.174 The first 40 G.91 were purchased second-hand from the Luftwaffe, out of the aircraft that had originally been produced for Greece and which differed from the rest of the Luftwaffe G.91s sufficiently to create maintenance problems. The aircraft replaced the Portuguese F-86 Sabre. Colonial War The army participated in colonial war (Portuguese Colonial War) from


Jayapura

publisher Australia @ War accessdate 7 January 2008 author Peter Dunn date 27 August 2005 thumb right ''Enterprise'' on the right with the Fifth Fleet at Majuro, 1944. (File:US fleet at Majuro Atoll 1944.jpg) Detached from TF 58 with escorts, ''Enterprise'' launched raids on Jaluit Atoll on 20 February, then steamed to Majuro and Espiritu Santo. Sailing on 15 March in TG 36.1, she provided air cover and close support for the landings on Emirau Island (Landing on Emirau) (19–25 March). The carrier rejoined TF 58 on 26 March, and for the next 12 days, joined in a series of strikes against the islands of Yap, Ulithi, Woleai, and Palau. After a week's rest and replenishment at Majuro, ''Enterprise'' sailed on 14 April to support landings in the Hollandia (currently known as Jayapura) (Jayapura) area of New Guinea, and then hit Truk again from 29–30 April. With Majuro as her base, ''North Carolina'' joined in the attacks on Palau and Woleai on 31 March–1 April, shooting down another enemy plane during the approach phase. On Woleai, 150 enemy aircraft were destroyed along with ground installations. Support for the capture of the Hollandia (currently known as Jayapura) (Jayapura) area of New Guinea followed (13–24 April); then another major raid on Truk (29–30 April), during which ''North Carolina'' splashed yet another enemy aircraft. At Truk, ''North Carolina'' Wikipedia:Jayapura Commons:Category:Jayapura


Yap

, she provided air cover and close support for the landings on Emirau Island (Landing on Emirau) (19–25 March). The carrier rejoined TF 58 on 26 March, and for the next 12 days, joined in a series of strikes against the islands of Yap, Ulithi, Woleai, and Palau. After a week's rest and replenishment at Majuro, ''Enterprise'' sailed on 14 April to support landings in the Hollandia (currently known as Jayapura) (Jayapura) area of New Guinea, and then hit Truk again from 29–30 April. image list1 Alaska • Aleutian Islands (Aleutian Islands) • American cordillera (American cordillera) • Andes • Antarctica • Bali • Borneo • Bougainville (Bougainville Island) • British Columbia (British Columbia) • California • Cascade Range (Cascade Range) • Challenger Deep (Challenger Deep) • Coast Mountains (Coast Mountains) • Fais Island (Fais Island) • Flores • Guam • Honshū • Insular Mountains (Insular Mountains) • Java (Java (island)) • Kamchatka (Kamchatka Peninsula) • Kurile Islands (Kurile Islands) • Luzon • Mariana Islands (Mariana Islands) • Melanesia • Micronesia • Mindanao • New Guinea (New Guinea) • North Island (NZL) (North Island) • Northern Mariana Islands (Northern Mariana Islands) • Oregon • Pacific Coast Range (Pacific Coast Range) • Pacific Ocean (Pacific Ocean) • Polynesia • Rocky Mountains • San Andreas Fault (San Andreas Fault) • Queen Charlotte Fault • Sierra Madre (PHL) (Sierra Madre (Philippines)) • Sierra Madre (USA) (Sierra Madre Mountains (California)) • Sierra Madre del Sur (Sierra Madre del Sur) • Sierra Madre Occidental (Sierra Madre Occidental) • Sierra Madre Oriental (Sierra Madre Oriental) • South Island (NZL) (South Island) • Sulawesi • Timor • Washington (Washington (U.S. state)) • Yap • Yukon Territory ''Mustin'' next joined the support force of powerful TF 58, protecting vital fleet oilers as the carriers and planes they fueled struck Palau, Yap, Woleai, and Ulithi in the Carolines on 30 March – 1 April. She returned to the southwest Pacific on 7 April to screen carriers in amphibious assaults on New Guinea, at Aitape and Hollandia (currently known as Jayapura) (Jayapura) in April, and at Wakde in May. The continuing operations on and around New Guinea gave ''Mustin'' varied duty, on escort, patrol, bombardment, and as fighter-director, as one landing after another moved up the coast to wrest the huge island from the enemy. Noemfoor, Sansapor, Mios Woendi, Humboldt Bay (Teluk Yos Sudarso), Biak were all struck by forces in which ''Mustin'' served. ''Baltimore'' continued to provide fire support in the Marianas (Mariana Islands) attacks (21–22 February), the Palau-Yap-Ulithi-Woleai raid (30 March – 1 April); the Hollandia (Jayapura) (currently known as Jayapura) landing (21–24 April); the Truk-Satawan-Ponape (Pohnpei) raid (29 April – 1 May), air strikes against Marcus Island (19–20 May) and Wake Island (23 May), the Saipan invasion (11–24 June); and the Battle of the Philippine Sea (19–20 June). Using Eniwetok as her base, ''Lexington'' flew sorties over Guam and against the Palaus and Bonins into August. She arrived in the Carolinas on 7 September for three days of strikes against Yap and Ulithi, then began attacks on Mindanao, the Visayas, the Manila area, and shipping along the west coast of Luzon, preparing for the coming assault on Leyte (Leyte (island)). Her task force then blasted Okinawa on 10 October and Formosa (Taiwan) two days later to destroy bases from which opposition to the Philippines campaign might be launched . She was again unscathed through the air battle fought after the Formosa assault. From Eniwetok, ''Princeton'' retired to Majuro, thence to Espiritu Santo for replenishment. On 23 March, she got underway for strikes against enemy installation and shipping in the Carolines (Caroline Islands). After striking the Palaus, Woleai and Yap, the force replenished at Majuro and sortied again 13 April. Steaming to New Guinea, the carriers provided air cover for the Hollandia (Jayapura) operation (21–29 April), then crossed back over the International Date Line to raid Truk (29–30 April) and Ponape (Pohnpei) (1 May). ''South Dakota'' departed the Marshall Islands on 12 February with the Truk striking force, launching attacks against that Japanese stronghold on 17–18 February. Six days later, she was in the screen for the carriers which launched the first air attacks against the Mariana Islands. The force was under constant enemy air attack, and ''South Dakota'' shot down four Japanese planes. She returned to Majuro from 26 February to 22 March, when she sailed with the fast carrier forces of the 5th Fleet (United States Fifth Fleet); the Fleet delivered air strikes from 30 March to 1 April against Palau, Yap, Woleai, and Ulithi in the Western Caroline Islands. ''Boston'' returned the Marianas, to support the invasion of Guam on 12 July, until the successful completion of the campaign on 15 August. The ship also took part in the raids on Palau-Yap-Ulithi between 25 and 27 July, as well as the landings on Morotai on 15 September, and the seizure of the southern Palaus between 6 September – 14 October. She also supported the raids on the Philippine Islands, starting on 9 September, until 24 September. On the morning of June 20, ''Yorktown'' steamed generally west with TF 58 while search planes groped for the fleeing enemy task force. Contact was made with the enemy at about 1540 when a pilot from


Palau

Commons:Category:Palau WikiPedia:Palau Dmoz:Regional Oceania Palau


Marshall Islands

for the invasion of the Marianas (Mariana and Palau Islands campaign). She sortied from Eniwetok on 17 July with Task Group 53.18 (TG 53.18). Scheduled fire commenced on the 21st in Agana Bay, Guam, as 3rd Marine Division (3rd Marine Division (United States)) went ashore. Lying close enough offshore to see pillbox (Bunker#Pillbox)es and trenches, ''McKee'' delivered close support fire through 4 August, when she retired with a group of carriers to New Hebrides. ''Dortch'' served


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