Places Known For

century development


Jingdezhen

and difficult to reproduce; for the least defect they are refused by the merchants, and so they remain in the hands of the potters, who cannot sell them to the Chinese, for they do not like such pieces".'' 14th century development In the early 14th century mass-production of fine, translucent, blue and white porcelain started at Jingdezhen, sometimes called the ''porcelain capital'' of China. This development was due to the combination of Chinese techniques and Islamic trade. The new ware was made possible by the export of cobalt from Persia (called ''Huihui qing'', 回回青, "Islamic blue"), combined with the translucent white quality of Chinese porcelain. Finlay, p.158''ff'' Cobalt blue was considered as a precious commodity, with a value about twice that of gold. Motifs also draw inspiration from Islamic decorations. A large portion of these blue-and-white wares was then shipped to Southwest-Asian markets through the Muslim traders based in Guangzhou. Chinese blue and white porcelain was ''once-fired'': after the porcelain body was dried, decorated with refined cobalt-blue pigment mixed with water and applied using a brush, coated with a clear glaze and fired at high temperature. From the 16th century, local sources of cobalt blue started to be developed, although Persian cobalt remained the most expensive. Production of blue and white wares has continued at Jingdezhen to this day. Blue and white porcelain made at Jingdezhen probably reached the height of its technical excellence during the reign of the Kangxi emperor of the Qing Dynasty (reigned 1661 to 1722). Wikipedia:Jingdezhen


Port Klang

and scuttled off at Wikipedia:Port Klang Dmoz:Regional Asia Malaysia States_and_Federal_Territories Selangor Localities Port_Klang commons:Category:Port Klang


Portuguese Malacca

: a dictionary of arts, sciences, literature and general information publisher Encyclopædia Britannica accessdate 17 October 2010 The remaining five states in the peninsula, known as the Unfederated Malay States, while not directly under British rule, also accepted British advisers around the turn of the 20th century. Development on the Peninsula and Borneo were generally separate until the 19th century. Under British rule the immigration of Chinese and Indians to serve as labourers was encouraged. - 100px (File:Flag Portugal (1640).svg) 1511-1641 Flag of Portuguese Malacca, a colony in the Portuguese Empire White rectangle centrally charged with the coat of arms bearing five castles on an ogival or heater-shaped shield and surmounted by an open royal crown. -


Federated Malay States

century. Development on the Peninsula and Borneo were generally separate until the 19th century. Under British rule the immigration of Chinese and Indians to serve as labourers was encouraged.


North Borneo

The remaining five states in the peninsula, known as the Unfederated Malay States, while not directly under British rule, also accepted British advisers around the turn of the 20th century. Development on the Peninsula and Borneo


Ensenada, Baja California

on the island and in 2006 Brad Gerlach, 2006 winner of Big XXL, surfed a wave of 68 feet in December 2006. Tourists also stop in the city on their way to their destinations farther


Brighton and Hove

ind051007 Due to the proximity of Falmer to the city of Brighton and Hove, the parish has been substantially affected by the twentieth-century development of its large neighbour. Since the 1960s it has been home to the University of Sussex campus, and in the 1990s, the former Brighton Polytechnic Falmer campus became a principal base of the University of Brighton. The village lends its name to the University of Sussex's alumni magazine. Sompting, Lancing, Shoreham-by-Sea


Rock Island, Illinois

village of Saukenuk. The park includes a museum and a number of hiking trails along the Rock River (Rock River (Illinois)) and in surrounding woods. Railroads and development thumb The Harper House (File:Harper House Rock Island IL postcard no 2.jpg) European Americans founded the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad here in 1851. It was informally known as the Rock Island Line (rock island line). As part of later nineteenth-century development, two first-class hotels


Straits Settlements

under British rule, also accepted British advisers around the turn of the 20th century. Development on the Peninsula and Borneo were generally separate until the 19th century. Under British rule the immigration of Chinese and Indians to serve as labourers was encouraged. '''British Malaya''' loosely described a set of states on the Malay Peninsula and the Island of Singapore that were brought under British (United Kingdom) control between the 18th and the 20th centuries. Unlike the term "British India", which excludes the Indian princely states, British Malaya is often used to refer to the Malay States under indirect British rule as well as the Straits Settlements that were under the sovereignty of the British Crown. Before the formation of Malayan Union in 1946, the territories were not placed under a single unified administration. Instead, British Malaya comprised the Straits Settlements, the Federated Malay States and the Unfederated Malay States. '''British Malaya''' loosely described a set of states on the Malay Peninsula and the Island of Singapore that were brought under British (United Kingdom) control between the 18th and the 20th centuries. Unlike the term "British India", which excludes the Indian princely states, British Malaya is often used to refer to the Malay States under indirect British rule as well as the Straits Settlements that were under the sovereignty of the British Crown. Before the formation of Malayan Union in 1946, the territories were not placed under a single unified administration. Instead, British Malaya comprised the Straits Settlements, the Federated Malay States and the Unfederated Malay States. Some Chinese convicts deported from the Straits Settlements were sent to Madras in India, the "Madras district gazetteers, Volume 1" reported an incident where the Chinese convicts escaped and killed the police sent to apprehend them: "Much of the building work was done by Chinese convicts sent to the Madras jails from the Straits Settlements (where there was no sufficient prison accommodation) and more than once these people escaped from the temporary buildings' in which they were confined at Lovedale. In 186^ seven of them tjot away and it was several days before they were apprehended by the Tahsildar, aided by Badagas sent out in all directions to search. On the 28th July in the following year twelve others broke out during a very stormy night and parties of armed police were sent out to scour the hills for them. They were at last arrested in Malabar a fortnight later. Some police weapons were found in their possession, and one of the parties of police had disappeared—an ominous coincidence. Search was made all over the country for the party, and at length, on the 15th September, their four bodies were found lying in the jungle at Walaghát , half way down the Sispára ghát path, neatly laid out in a row with their severed heads carefully placed on their shoulders. It turned out that the wily Chinamen, on being overtaken, had at first pretended to surrender and had then suddenly attacked the police and killed them with their own weapons."


Everett, Washington

. right upright thumb Bitter Lake (Image:Seattle Map - Bitter Lake.png) '''Bitter Lake''' is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington (Washington (U.S. state)), USA (United States), named after its most notable feature, Bitter Lake (Bitter Lake (Seattle)). It was a mostly natural forest of Douglas-fir and Western Redcedar, inhabited by Native Americans (Native Americans of the United States), until the late 19th century. Development especially picked up when the Seattle-to- Everett


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